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Apostles' Creed

(608 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] The received text (T, first attested by Pirmin, Scarapsus §§10/12/28) of the creed known in the modern period as the Symbolum apostolicum or Symbolum Apostolorum goes back to the so-called Old Roman creed (R). The great majority of scholars accept the hypothesis of J. Ussher, archbishop of Armagh (1647), that R is first attested in Greek in Marcellus of Ancyra (Epiphanius, Haer. 72.3.1 = BSGR §17) or in the Psalter of Aethelstan (§18); the Latin text can be reconstructed from Rufinus's Explanatio symboli (§19). From 1910–1916 onward,…

Cappadocian Theology

(542 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] The monastic theologians and bishops, Basil the Great, his brother Gregory of Nyssa and their friend Gregory of Nazianzus came from the province of Cappadocia in Asia Minor and spent most of their lives there. For this reason, they are often referred to by modern historians and theologians as “the three great Cappadocians.” A cousin of Gregory of Nazianzus and colleague of Basil, Amphilochius of Iconium, is sometimes added to their number. The t…

Dionysius of Milan

(138 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] officiated from about 351 as bishop of Milan. On account of his bold stance at the synod held there in 355 (Homoeans), Constantius II banished him to Armenia together with Eusebius of Vercelli and Lucifer of Cagliari; he died there. Perhaps still in the 4th century, his remains were brought back to Milan, though certainly not under his second successor Ambrose of Milan, as a secondary passage in a let-¶ ter of Basil the Great would seem to want to suggest (Bas. Ep. 197.2; cf. BHL 2168–2170). Christoph Markschies Bibliography S. Cavallin, “Die Legendenbildung um den Mai…

Dynamism

(134 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] Traditional terminology in the history of dogma and theology distinguishes between “Dynamic” and a “Modalist” Monarchianism. It thereby subsumes under a common generic term (although see A. v. Harnack) the groups that energetically combatted the Logos theology (Logos) and the doctrine of a plurality of divine hypostases (Hypostasis; in e.g. …

Ptolemy the Gnostic

(406 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] Ptolemy worked in Rome as a freelance Christian teacher around the middle of the 2nd century; he was active in the “school” of the Roman teacher Valentinus (Iren. Haer. I prol. 2), possibly because he was a personal disciple of Valentinus. Only one text survives that can be ascribed to Ptolemy with assurance: an instructional epistle to the Roman matron Flora, preserved by Epiphanius of Salamis ( Haer. 33.3–7). The epistle deals with biblical interpretation, the Old Testament law, and the theory of principles. A brief discussion of Valentinian Gn…

Jerome, Saint

(741 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph | Thümmel, Hans Georg
[German Version] I. Person – II. Art History I. Person (c. 347, Stridon – 419/420, Bethlehem). Jerome was from a landowning Christian family. After an excellent education in grammar and rhetoric in Rome, Jerome went to Trier in the mid-360s. There he became acquainted withmonasticism (II) and rejected a secular career. He spent the following years in upper Italy. Probably at the beginning of the 370s, he undertook a pilgrimage to the holy sites in the East. However, an illness forced him to stop in Antioch. After recovering, he set out into the “wilderness of Chalcis.” Jerome stylized ¶ th…

Christianity

(28,993 words)

Author(s): Stolz, Fritz | Markschies, Christoph | Koschorke, Klaus | Neuner, Peter | Felmy, Karl Christian | Et al.
[German Version] I. Religious Studies – II. Church History – III. Survey of the Christian Confessions – IV. Systematic Theology I. Religious Studies For an overview of Christianity at the end of the second millennium of its development, it is reasonable to give a comparative presentation against the background of the world of religion. It must be remembered, however, that “religion” is not an immutable, ahistorical quantity: it is variable and controversial. The modern concept of religion is …

Church History/Church Historiography

(14,105 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph | Plümacher, Eckhard | Brennecke, Hanns Christof | Beutel, Albrecht | Koschorke, Klaus | Et al.
[German Version] I. Concept, Presuppositions – II. Development – III. Middle Eastern Church History and Historiography – IV. Religious Education I. Concept, Presuppositions 1. Concept The concept of church history has not yet been studied sufficiently, but it is already clear that since antiquity extraordinarily different conceptions of Christian historiography have been in simultaneous competition over the interpretation of past, present, and future. Often the different methodological option…

Image of God

(2,928 words)

Author(s): Janowski, Bernd | Markschies, Christoph | Wielandt, Rotraud
[German Version] I. Old Testament and Judaism – II. Christianity – III. Islam I. Old Testament and Judaism 1. Only in three passages does the Old Testament speak of humankind's being made in the image of God (collective use of הָ]אָדָם]/[ ] ʾādām in Gen 1; cf. Gen 1:27: male and female): in the relationship between God and human beings in Gen 1:26f. and 9:6, and in the relationship between human beings in Gen 5:1, 3 (all P). Substantially the same idea is conveyed in Ps 8:6–9*; for later treatment of the theme, Sir 17:3–7 and Wis 2…

Baumgarten-Crusius, Ludwig Friedrich Otto

(205 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] (Jul 31, 1788, Merseburg – May 31, 1843, Jena) studied classical philology and theology in Leipzig. After completing his habilitation in 1809 in the philosophical faculty there, he became associate professor of theology in 1812 and full professor of theology in 1817 in Jena. Baumgarten's erudition is demonstrated by his numerous articles on ancient philology and church h…

Maximilla, Priscilla and Quintilla

(236 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] Together with Montanus, the three women belong to the principal prophetic personalities of what later came to be known as the Montanism of Asia Minor. The variant name form “Prisca” is also attested for Priscilla in the writings of Tertullian. Seven of their prophetic logia have been preserved (nos. 5–11, Heine). Quintilla may well have belonged to a second generation of prophetesses, as her name is not explicitly mentioned in the earliest sources (cf. however Eus. Hist. eccl. V 18.6). How the exact hierarchical and institutional relationship of the origin…

Migne, Jacques Paul

(339 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] (Oct 25, 1800, St.-Fluor, Département Cantal – Oct 24, 1875, Paris), son of a merchant, began his theological studies in 1817 at the theological college in Orléans, where he soon became prefect of studies and later a lecturer. In 1824 he was ordained to the priesthood. From 1833 he worked as a journalist in Paris; with the support of patrons, he founded several journals that attracted great attention but had to be discontinued for financial reasons. In 1836 he turned to publishing…

Aquarians

(150 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] The use of water instead of wine in the Lord's Supper is attested esp. in the so-called NT Apocrypha ( Acts Pet. II 2; Acts Paul 7; Acts Thom. 120–21/152/158[?]), but it seems also to have been customary occasionally when wine was unavailable in the mainstream church ( Martyrdom of Pionius 3.1); Irenaeus ascribed a corresponding practice to Jewish Christians ( Haer. V 1.3); Clement of Alexandria to Encratites ( Paedagogus II 32.3–4; Stromata I 96.1); Epiphanius to Marcion ( Haer. 42.3.3); Theodoret to students of Tatian called ῾Υδροπαραστάται/ Hydroparastátai (Thdt. Hae…

Musanus

(117 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] According to Eusebius ( Hist. eccl. IV 28, cf. also 21) Musanus wrote a lost, “very elegant” book against people who had gone over to the so-called Encratites. Both the author's date and his place remain unclear. Suggestions, among others, are (because of the statement of Eusebius) the reign of Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161–180), or on the basis of Eusebius, Chronicorum liber ad annum, 2220 the time of Septimius Severus (193–211), and the regions of Egypt or Asia Minor. Christoph Markschies Bibliography A. v. Harnack, Geschichte der altchristlichen Litteratur bis E…

Encratites

(130 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] The Early Church's heresiologies employ this term (derived from Gk ἐγκράτεια/ enkráteia, “self-control,” “abstinence”) to describe a group of ascestics (Asceticism) and date their origins to the 2nd century. Irenaeus traces them back to Saturninus of Antioch and Marcion ( Haer. I 28.1); he, like Eusebius of Caesarea, names as founder the Syrian Tatian (Eus. Hist. eccl. IV 29.6). Typical ascetic positions are attributed to them, for example the renunciation of marriage and the consumption of …

Montanus

(124 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] was one of the three founders of a 2nd-century prophetic movement in Asia Minor (Maximilla, Priscilla and Quintilla), which since the 4th century has been called Montanism after him. As his Phrygian name indicates, he apparently came from Asia Minor. Later heresiology (Heresy: II, 2) in authors of the 4th century transmits further but probably unhistorical details of his life. Thus he is said to have been originally a priest of Apollo ( Disputatio [in Heine, 123]) or Cybele (Jer. Ep. 41,4), and to have hanged himself. Epiphanius of Salamis records four prophe…

Lietzmann, Hans

(458 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] (Mar 3, 1875, Düsseldorf – Jun 25, 1942, Locarno). After passing his Abitur in Wittenberg, Lietzmann went to Jena in 1893 to study classical philology and theology, but it was his studies at Bonn from 1894 to 1898 that enduringly influenced him. There his real academic mentor was H. Usener, a renowned scholar in classical philology and religious studies, from whom he acquired a love of philological detail, a particular concern for large-scale religio-historical relationships, and a great inte…

Pelagius/Pelagians/Semi-Pelagians

(2,236 words)

Author(s): Löhr, Winrich | Markschies, Christoph | Holmes, Stephen R.
[German Version] I. Church History Pelagius was an ascetic and theological writer from Britain. Before 410 he taught in Rome, and in 411/412, following the capture of Rome by the Goths, went to Palestine after a short stay in North Africa. His teaching, according to which the possibility of sinlessness was an essential part of human nature, provoked the criticism of Augustine and Jerome. This teaching had its setting in the pastoral care of members of the Roman elite. Pelagius stated that when one re…

Eucharist/Communion

(26,590 words)

Author(s): Hahn, Ferdinand | Markschies, Christoph | Angenendt, Arnold | Kaufmann, Thomas | Koch, Ernst | Et al.
[German Version] I. New Testament – II. Church History – III. Dogmatics – IV. Liturgical History – V. Practical Theology – VI. Missiology I. New Testament 1. Background Sacred meals are common to all religions. Before examining them in the context of the NT, it is necessary first to inquire into their background in the OT and in Judaism, whereupon it becomes evident that sacrificial meals play no role in them. Only the dai…

Paul Melanos

(230 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] of Bēth Ukkāme (Paul the Black, Paulos Melanos; c. 500 Alexandria – 584 Constantinople). In 564 Jacob Baradaeus consecrated Archimandrite Paul, who had grown up in Alexandria, as the anti-Chalcedonian (Jacobite) patriarch of Antioch (Monophysites), a position he held until 577. His tenure was beset by serious church-political conflicts. A temporary flirtation of the patriarch with the creed of Chalcedon affirming the two natures of Christ (c. 571) was followed by an abrupt dissoci…

Succession, Apostolic

(3,002 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph | Wohlmuth, Josef | Felmy, Karl Christian | Campenhausen, Axel Frhr. v. | Neuner, Peter
[German Version] I. Terminology Especially in ecumenical discussion (Ecumene), there is a widespread assumption that the expression apostolic succession denotes a primitive and clearly defined attribute of ecclesiastical office. However, the notion that the marks of the church (Notae ecclesiae) include an unbroken chain of office holders going back to the apostles and that each of these office holders was placed in office through the laying-on of hands of another legitimate office holder appeared on the scene rel…

Gnosis/Gnosticism

(8,426 words)

Author(s): Filoramo, Giovanni | Markschies, Christoph | Logan, Alastair H.B. | Koslowski, Peter | Leicht, Reimund | Et al.
[German Version] I. Religious Studies – II. Christianity – III. Philosophy – IV. Judaism – V. Islam I. Religious Studies Gnosis (Gk γνῶσις/ gnṓsis, “knowledge”) is a particular form of religious knowledge that brings salvation per se. It is not dependent on a particular object but has its value and its justification in itself. It is total knowledge, since it overcomes the dichotomy between subject and object – in fact every dichotomy –, because it is absolute knowledge of the absolute. From the point of view of the history o…

Apostolic Succession

(2,883 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph | Wohlmuth, Josef | Felmy, Karl C. | Campenhausen, Axel Frhr. von | Neuner, Peter
[German Version] I. Terminology Ecumenical discussion (Ecumenicalism), in particular, assumes that the term “apostolic succession” refers to an original and clearly defined characteristic of the church office. However, the notion that the notae ecclesiae indicate an unbroken chain, going back to the apostles, of officeholders who have each come into office through the laying-on of hands by another legitimate officeholder, appeared only relatively late and is not the original meaning of the underlying Greek and Latin semantic field. The Greek and Latin terms διαδοχή/ diadochḗ/…

Will

(3,711 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph | Loos, Fritz | Herms, Eilert | Hühn, Lore
[German Version] I. History of the Term The development and spread of the term will go hand in hand with the history of Christian theology. Classical Greek had no single, distinct term like will denoting an independent mental faculty. The voluntative dimension was contained in the terms used for rational deliberation, decision-making, willingness, and non-rational desire. For Aristotleβουλή/ boulḗ is conation (Striving) that ensues after deliberation and hence is guided by reason based on knowledge ( De anima III 10, 433a ¶ 20–23). In the Bible, especially in Paul, the phenom…

Suger

(206 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] (c. 1081, Argenteuil – 1151, St.-Denis), was born to a wealthy family; c. 1091 he became an oblate in the royal Frankish abbey of St.-Denis before the gates of Paris. In 1101 he took his solemn vows; in 1107 he defended the exempt status of the abbey before Pope Paschal II. After serving in various political and ecclesiastical offices, he was elected abbot in 1122. He reformed his own abbey and also served as regent of France from 1137 to 1140 and from 1147 to 1149. His partial reconstruction of the abbey church (1140–1144) is famous; he discussed it in his De consecratione and De o…

Celestine I, Pope

(122 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] (422–432). As the successor of Boniface I, Celestine attempted to consolidate the Roman primacy, but he encountered the resistance of the West African bishops. Moreover, he opposed Pelagianism (Pelagius) and from 430 Nestorius; the majority of his correspondence relates to this conflict. ¶ Eventually, he sent Germanus of Auxerre in 429 and “the Celtic bishop” Palladius in 431 to England and Ireland for the anti-Pelagian mission. Christoph Markschies Bibliography CPL 1650–1654 PL 50, 417–558 ACO I/1/7, 125–137; I/2/5, 5–101 On Celestine: E. Caspar, Geschichte des…

Early Church

(6,745 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] I. The Term – II. Periods of the Early Church – III. The History of the Church and of Christianity in Antiquity – IV. Review I. The Term The term “early church” is one of the most common English expressions used to designate the church during the times of the emperors in Greco-Roman antiquity, i.e. the Christian church from its beginnings until the end of antiquity or Late Antiquity. The end of this …

Montanism

(1,168 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] I. Terminology and Sources – II. History – III. Theology I. Terminology and Sources Since the late 4th century, the adherents of a prophetic movement in early Christianity dating from the 2nd century have been referred to polemically as “Montanists,” and the movement itself was called “Montanism” (e.g Cyril of Jerusalem, Catecheses XVI 8.6 or [Pseudo-?]Didymus, De trinitate III 18.23 and 41 [PG 39, 881 B, 924 C, also 984 B]). This terminology, which refers to a prophet Montanus, has been accepted by modern scholarship, although the m…

Men

(10,627 words)

Author(s): Heller, Birgit | Gerstenberger, Erhard S. | Lichtenberger, Hermann | Greschat, Katharina | Markschies, Christoph | Et al.
[German Version] I. Religious Studies – II. Old Testament – III. Primitive Christianity – IV. Church History – V. Judaism – VI. Islam – VII. Asia, Africa, and Latin America – VIII. Social Sciences – IX. Psychology – X. Philosophy of Religion – XI. Practical Theology I. Religious Studies To date there have been hardly any works devoted to men from the perspective of religious studies. Given the androcentrism of traditional scholarship, the category of homo religiosus has usually yielded knowledge of the religious male, but this work must …

Ambrose of Milan (Saint)

(439 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] (333/334, Trier – 397) was an important bishop and is regarded as one of the four teachers of the Western Church since the end of the 7th century. Ambrose was from a prominent family of Roman (city?) Christians; educated in Rome, he was the governor of Aemilia Liguria with a seat in Milan between 372 and 374. In 374, as the compromise candidat…

Inner Person

(1,567 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph | Burkert, Walter | Betz, Hans Dieter | Heesch, Matthias
[German Version] I. Concept – II. Antiquity – III. New Testament – IV. Early Church – V. Systematic Theology I. Concept The notion of a “real person” residing within the outer human being is widely attested in ancient literature and became part of a comprehensive system of metaphors by the time of Hellenism at the latest. However, this notion is conveyed through very different terms, corresponding also to conceptions of rather differing nature. The single English concept “inner person,” which cannot adequately …

Neo-Niceanism

(527 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] The modern term “neo-Niceanism” (Ger. Neunicaenismus), with its variants, is said to go back to F. Loofs. It denotes a specific Trinitarian position of the later 4th century (Arius) that was made normative in 381 at the Second Imperial Council of Constantinople (Constantinople, Council of: IV, 1) and in other confessional documents ( Symbolum Quicumque ). It belongs to the traditional corpus of teaching that shapes the identity of most Christian churches and faith communities. It is true that in the last 100 years the content of the expression “neo-Nicea…

Nestorianism

(956 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] The term Nestorianism can be used in two senses. First, it can designate the theology (and sometimes also the ecclesiastical organization) of today’s Holy Apostolic and Catholic Assyrian Church of the East, whose members are called Nestorians (or East Syrians or Chaldeans; Apostolic Church of the East) because in 484/486, in conscious departure from the Roman imperial church, they adopted the Christology of Nestorianism, which had been condemned at the Council of Ephesus in 431 (Nes…

Saturninus of Antioch

(162 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] Among the early Gnostic (Gnosis: III, 2) followers of Simon Magus, Irenaeus of Lyon mentions Saturninus of Antioch ( Haer. I 24.1f.), who probably lived in the early 2nd century. Irenaeus claims he taught that the world and humankind were created by seven individual angels and that humans were created in the image of “the supreme power,” which also gave them the “spark of life.” The angels in turn, according to Saturninus, were creatures of the supreme unknown father; the “God of the Jews” was one o…

Enhypostasis/Anhypostasis

(621 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] Leontius of Jerusalem and other neo-Chalcedonians (Neo-Chalcedonism) use the Greek adjective ἐνυπόστατος/ enhypóstatos from Late Antiquity to describe their view that the dogma of the human and divine natures of Christ as articulated by the Council of Chalcedon (Christology) is not referring to independent hypostases or persons, and that instead each of the two natures exists “enhypostatically” in relation to the one person of Christ and to the one hypostasis of the Trinity in three hypostases (Leontius, Adversus Nestorianos II 13 [PG 86, 1561 …

Origen

(3,010 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] I. Life – II. Works – III. Theology (c. 185/186 Alexandria – c. 253/254) I. Life In reconstructing the life of Origen, we must rely on information given by his grandson and pupil Eusebius of Caesarea ( Hist. eccl. VI 1–39). The relevant portions of the Apology for Origen of Pamphilus of Caesarea (CPG 1, 1715) were not translated into Latin by Tyrannius Rufinus and have been lost with the Greek original, but certain statements by Jerome, Rufinus, and Photius of Constantinople (Bibl. Codex 118) may derive from that source. The detailed section in Epiphanius of Salamis ( Haer. 64…

Traditio apostolica

(252 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] (also called the Church Order of Hippolytus). E. Schwartz (1910) and Richard Hugh Connolly (1916) discovered that a few Late Antique church orders could be treated stemmatically as editions or translations of a (lost) literary archetype. Both scholars theorized that it had the title (᾿Αποστολικὴ παράδοσις/ apostolikḗ parádosis, “Apostolic Tradition”) and had been written by Hippolytus. Today only a minority of scholars accept this double hypothesis. What has been confirmed is the hypothesis of a single archetype, probably in Greek, of these chur…

Free Will

(7,479 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph | Loos, Fritz | Herms, Eilert | Fraenkel, Carlos | Nagel, Tilman
[German Version] I. Terminology – II. Law – III. Church History – IV. Philosophy of Religion – V. Dogmatics – VI. Ethics – VII. Judaism – VIII. Islam I. Terminology Classical Antiquity lacked a term for free will, a concept first popularized by Christians in Late Antiquity. Aristotle discussed the problem in the context of asking in what sense actions lie “within us” (ἐϕ᾿ ἡμῖν/ ephʾ hēmín; Arist. Eth. Nic. III 1, 1110a, 1–3). The Stoics called the concept τὸ αὐτεξούσιον/ to autexoúsion (“self-control”; ¶ cf. Chrysippus [ SVF II, 975–990]), translated into Latin as liberum arbitriu…

Christopher, Saint

(422 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] The earliest evidence for the veneration of a Christopher goes back to the year 452, when the honorific title Χριστόφορος/ Christóphoros (“Christ-bearer”) first came into use as a proper name ( ASS Nov. II/2, 396 no. 39). The Acts of Saint Christopher (BHG 309) date from the early 6th century. They apparently equate Christopher with Christianus, a dog-headed soldier saint from the Acts of Bartholomew, who was called Reprebos before his baptism and who came from the land of the cannibals. Early Byzantine iconography accordingly portrayed…

Platonism

(4,813 words)

Author(s): Halfwassen, Jens | Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] I. Philosophy 1. General character.  The influence of Plato’s thought was unlike that of any other philosopher. With the Academy (I) (c. 385 bce), Plato was the first philosopher to found a school in the institutional sense and so establish a philosophical tradition. Moreover, his criticism of writing shows that he gave precedence to the oral transmission of his thought by his students over his Dialogues, which were mainly written to publicize the ¶ Academy. In this sense, Platonism in antiquity understood itself as the legitimate heir of Plato’s phil…

History/Concepts of History

(12,750 words)

Author(s): Rudolph, Kurt | Görg, Manfred | Schlüter, Margarete | Römer, Nils | Cancik, Hubert | Et al.
[German Version] I. Religious Studies – II. Ancient Near East and Israel – III. Judaism – IV. Greece and Rome – V. New Testament – VI. Church History – VII. Dogmatics – VIII. Ethics – IX. Philosophy I. Religious Studies History is a major aspect of the study of religion. Apart from its roots in the Enlightenment idea of tolerance, it owes its scholarly development to the historicism of the 19th century. As a result, the expression history of religions ( Religionsgeschichte, histoire des religions, storia delle religioni) has remained dominant in continental Europe, in con…

Congregational Order

(159 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[German Version] Norms for the life and theology of Christian communities in the first century were primarily set by the two-Testament Bible, which had become a collection of authoritative texts, but also by church orders in the true sense, by the developing confession (of faith), initially set down in free formulations, and by theology, condensed into dogmas since the imperial councils of the 4th century (Nicea, Constantinople: IV). Naturally, after the demise o…

Leo I

(910 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
Leo I (d. 461), known as Leo the Great, was pope beginning in the summer of 440. Not much is known about Leo’s early years. Suggestions that he was born in Tuscany remain improbable as long as other signs point to an urban Roman origin. Before becoming pope, he was (arch)deacon at the papal ¶ court, and as early as 440 Empress Galla Placidia entrusted him with a political mission to Gaul. Leo devoted a great deal of energy to his urban Roman congregation, particularly through his sermons, and encouraged the production of narrative and pictorial cyc…

Tertullian

(762 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus (ca. 160–ca. 225) was an African church father who wrote primarily in Latin. Texts available for a reconstruction of Tertullian’s biography include, next to his own writings, accounts by Eusebius (ca. 260–ca. 340) and Jerome (ca. 345–420). It has been shown, however, that information from the fourth-century authors should not be used uncritically. From his own writings it appears that Tertullian’s father possibly was in the military, and one could add Jerome’s account that his father was a centurio proconsularis, thus a centurion in the cohors …

Jerome

(956 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
Jerome (ca. 345–420), born Eusebius Hieronymus (perhaps as early as 333), was an outstanding translator, exegete, and theologian of the early church. He was the son of a well-to-do Christian family that owned property in Strido (near Emona, or modern Ljubljana, Slovenia). He was educated in Rome, and his teachers included, until 363, the famous grammarian Aelius Donatus (though not Marius Victorinus, neither does Jerome seem to have been closely acquainted with Ambrose in Rome; he did, however, …

Barnabas, Epistle of

(220 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] The writer of this treatise, written in the form of a letter, (CPG I 1050), who belongs to the so-called  Apostolic Fathers, does not give his name. The MSS as well as Christian theologians of the 2nd/3rd cents. like  Clemens and  Origenes (who regarded the letter as καθολικὴ ἐπιστολή: c. Cels. 1,63) state that the author is  Barnabas, the travelling companion of St. Paul. The first part (chs. 2-16) interprets holy Scripture (= the OT) in terms of God, Christ and the new people of…

Origenes

(1,242 words)

Author(s): Baltes, Matthias (Münster) | Lakmann, Marie-Luise (Münster) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
(Ὠριγένης). [English version] [1] platon. Philosoph, 3. Jh. Platonischer Philosoph des 3. Jh.n.Chr., nicht gleichzusetzen mit dem gleichnamigen Christen O. [2] [1. 17ff.; 2. 404ff.]. Zusammen mit Erennios und Plotinos war er Schüler des Ammonios [9] Sakkas. O. verfaßte zwei Schriften: ‘Über die Dämonen und ‘Alleiniger Schöpfer ist der König (Ὅτι μόνος ποιητὴς ὁ βασιλεύς, fr. 1 und 2 Weber) [3. 92, 336f.]. Proklos überliefert zahlreiche Äußerungen zu stilkritischen und inhaltlichen Fragen zum Proömium de…

Apostelbriefe

(259 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] Mit A. bezeichnet man ant. christl. “Briefe”, die einem ἀπόστολος zugeschrieben wurden: a) solche, die in den ersten vier Jahrhunderten in den Kanon des Neuen Testamentes aufgenommen wurden, und b) solche, die zu den Apokryphen zählen: So 1. der pseudo-paulinische Laodicenerbrief, der sich in vielen lat. Bibelhss. findet, 2. der Briefwechsel zwischen den Korinthern und Paulus, 3. der Briefwechsel zwischen Seneca und Paulus 4. der Ps.-Titusbrief ›Über den Stand der Keuschheit‹, 5. die Epistula Petri, ferner, aus der Briefüberlieferung der gnostische…

Eirenaios

(933 words)

Author(s): Fornaro, Sotera (Sassari) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] [1] griech. Grammatiker, 1. Jh. (Εἰρηναῖος). Grammatiker, Schüler des Metrikers Heliodoros, 1. Jh.n.Chr. ( terminus ante quem aufgrund des Zitats im Hippokrateslexikon des Erotianos, 116,8 Nachmanson); lehrte wahrscheinlich auch in Rom unter dem lat. Namen Minucius Pacatus (vielleicht der rhetor Pacatus bei Sen. contr. 10, praef. 10). Er war kein Freigelassener [2]. Die Suda erwähnt ihn in der Praefatio und s.v. “E.” (ει 190) sowie s.v. “Pacatus” (π 29) und listet zahlreiche Titel von gramm. und lexikographischen Schri…

Akakios

(575 words)

Author(s): Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
(Ἀκάκιος). [English version] [1] aus Caesarea, Rhetor und Dichter, Zeitgenosse des Libanios Rhetor und Dichter aus Caesarea, Zeitgenosse des Libanios, aus zahlreichen Erwähnungen in dessen Briefen sowie durch Eunapios (Vitae Sophist. 497) bekannt (vgl. PLRE s. v. Acacius 6-8). Nach einem Studium in Athen lehrte er in Antiocheia [1] und soll in Konkurrenz zu Libanios diesem durch sein Naturtalent überlegen gewesen sein. A. ist vielleicht Verf. der unter Lukians Namen erh. Trag.-Parodie Ὠκύπους (Lib. epist. 1…

Fortunat(ian)us

(125 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] Der Afrikaner F. amtierte wohl von 342-368/370 als Bischof von Aquileia, nach Hieronymus schrieb er unter Constantius [2] II. (337-361) einen Evangelienkomm. Titulis ordinatis brevi sermone rusticoque (Hier. vir. ill. 97,1). Vielleicht hieraus sind drei kleine Fr. erh. geblieben (CPL 104); Hieronymus benutzte das Werk für seinen eigenen Matthäus-Komm. (praef.: PL 26,200 und epist. 10,3). F. nahm 345 Athanasios in Aquileia auf, soll dann aber Liberius von Rom zur Nachgiebigkeit gegenüber dem homöischen Rei…

Sozomenos

(312 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[English version] Salamanes Hermeias (Σῳζομενός, Σαλαμάνης Ἑρμείας), wahrscheinlich in Bethelea bei Gaza (evtl. das h. Bait Lāhiyā) in einer begüterten christl. Familie geb. (vgl. Phot. cod. 30; Soz. 5,15,14). Geburts- und Todesdatum lassen sich nicht ermitteln. Der palaestinische, z. T. auch monastische Kontext seiner Jugend (Mönchtum) prägt noch seine zw. 439 und 450 n. Chr. verfaßte Ἐκκλησιαστικὴ ἱστορία/‘Kirchengeschichte (=‘K.; Soz. 1,1,19). Nach 425 arbeitete S. als Rechtsanwalt (Soz. 2,3,10) bzw. scholastikós (so Phot. l.c. und die Tite…

Marius

(5,037 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Fündling, Jörg (Bonn) | Birley, A. R. (Düsseldorf) | Eck, Werner (Köln) | Roberts, Michael (Middletown, CT) | Et al.
Osk. Praen. (Egnatius [I 3]). Als röm. Gentilname seit dem 2. Jh.v.Chr. bezeugt. Bedeutendster Angehöriger ist der siebenfache Consul M. [I 1]; der prominente Namensträger der Kaiserzeit aus Spanien M. [II 3] ist wohl Nachkomme von dessen Familienangehörigen. I. Republikanische Zeit [English version] [I 1] M., C. Siebenfacher Consul, Sieger über Iugurtha, die Combern und Teutonen, Gegner Sullas Der siebenfache Consul; Sieger über Iugurtha sowie die Cimbern und Teutonen. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [English version] A. Der politische Aufstieg Geb. ca. 157 v.Chr. bei …

Makarios

(528 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
(Μακάριος). [English version] [1] Spartiat, 426/5 v. Chr. im Kriegsrat de Eurylochos [2] Spartiat, nahm 426/5 v.Chr. im Kriegsrat des Eurylochos [2] am Feldzug einer Streitmacht spartan. Bundesgenossen gegen Naupaktos und die Akarnanes teil und fiel bei Olpai (Thuk. 3,100,2; 109,1). Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum) Bibliography J. Roisman, The General Demosthenes and his Use of Military Surprise, 1993, 27ff. [English version] [2] M. von Alexandreia Mönch, 4. Jh. Nach der Historia monachorum in Aegypto [1. § 23] errichtete ein gewisser M. (4. Jh.n.Chr.) als erster eine …

Cyprianus

(966 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] [1] C. Gallus Heptateuchdichter s. Heptateuchdichter Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg) [2] C. Thascius Caecili(an)us Theologe, Bf. von Karthago 248/9 [English version] A. Biographie Caecilius Cyprianus qui et Thascius (so der überlieferte Name; er enthält das ursprüngliche punische Cogn. Thascius C. und das nach dem Taufpaten Caecilianus - so Pontius, vita 4 - bzw. Caecilius - so Hier. vir. ill. 67 - gewählte neue christl. Cogn. [1. 110, Anm. 1]) stammte aus einem reichen Elternhaus. Vor seiner Bekehrung…

Heraklas

(188 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] Vor seiner Bekehrung zum christl. Glauben besuchte H. mit seinem Bruder Plutarchos, der später den Märtyrertod starb, zunächst den Unterricht des platon. Philosophen Ammonios [9] Sakkas (Eus. HE 6,19,13), traf dort nach fünfjährigem Unterricht auf Origenes als Mitstudenten und besuchte dann dessen Unterricht in Alexandreia (Eus. HE 6,3,2). Zu einem bestimmten Zeitpunkt übertrug Origenes H. die Anfänger unter seinen Schülern (Eus. HE 6,15). H. galt selbst als gefeierter Lehrer (Eus. HE 6,31,2) und gehörte offenbar zu den Presbytern, die für d…

Domitianus

(2,122 words)

Author(s): Eck, Werner (Köln) | Birley, A. R. (Düsseldorf) | Portmann, Werner (Berlin) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] [1] Römischer Kaiser, geb. 51 n. Chr. Römischer Kaiser, urspr. Name T. Flavius Domitianus = Imperator Caesar Domitianus Augustus. Eck, Werner (Köln) [English version] A. Bis zum Tod des Titus Geb. am 24. Okt. 51 n.Chr. in Rom; seine Eltern waren T. Flavius Vespasianus und Flavia Domitilla. Seine Kindheit verbrachte D. in Rom; den Vater Vespasianus hat er nicht nach Iudaea begleitet. In der 2. Jahreshälfte 69 während der Herrschaft des Vitellius, als D.' Vater bereits zum Kaiser ausgerufen war, wurde sein Lebe…

Pacianus

(133 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] Nach 343 Bischof von Barcinona (h. Barcelona), starb vor 393; aus seinem Leben ist praktisch nichts bekannt. Von ihm sind drei Briefe an den Novatianer Sympronianus erh., in denen er gegen den Novatianismus (Novatianus) Stellung nimmt (CPL 561), ferner ein Büchlein Paraenesis sive exhortatorius libellus ad paenitentiam (‘Aufforderung zur Buße, CPL 562) und ein Sermo de baptismo (‘Predigt über die Taufe, CPL 563). Ein Cerv(ul)us (‘Hirsch) gegen das pagane Neujahrsfest, den Hieronymus erwähnt (vir. ill. 106), ist verloren. Der Autor verfügt übe…

Athenagoras

(184 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] von Athen (2.Jh. n.Chr.). Von diesem Autor stammt sicher eine mit πρεσβεία ( presbeía) überschriebene Apologie an die Kaiser Marcus Aurelius und Commodus (CPG I 1070; [1]); ob die am Ende dieses Textes angekündigte Schrift über die Auferstehung (§ 37) mit der in Paris. graec. 451 überlieferten (CPG I 1071) identisch ist, ist umstritten. Neben kritischen Voten, die diese Identifikation ebenso dem Kopisten zuschreiben wie die Angabe “Philosoph aus Athen” im Parisinus (Schoedel), finden sich auch Verteidiger der Authentizität (Barnard). Die Apologie muß zw. 17…

Iohannes

(6,414 words)

Author(s): Frey, Jörg (Stuttgart) | Domhardt, Yvonne (Zürich) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg) | Rist, Josef (Würzburg) | Redies, Michael (Berlin) | Et al.
(Ἰωάννης). Bekannte Personen u.a.: I. [1] der Evangelist, I. [4] Chrysostomos, der Bischof von Konstantinopel und Homilet, I. [18] Malalas, der Verf. der Weltchronik, I. [25] von Gaza, der Rhetor und Dichter, I. [33] von Damaskos, der Theologe. [1] I. der Evangelist [English version] A. Tradition und Kritik Der Verf. eines Evangeliums (Jo), dreier Briefe und der Apokalypse im NT heißt nach den Inschr. I. (= J.; der Name steht im Text nur Apk 1,1; 1,4; 1,9; 22,8). Seit Ende des 2. Jh. (Iren. adversus haereses 3,1,1; Polykrates von Ephesos nach…

Eusebios/-us

(2,005 words)

Author(s): Portmann, Werner (Berlin) | Leppin, Hartmut (Hannover) | Rist, Josef (Würzburg) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg) | Gruber, Joachim (Erlangen) | Et al.
(Εὐυσέβιος). [English version] [1] Flavius Eusebius Consul 347 n. Chr. Im Gesetz Cod. Theod. 11,1,1 von 360 n.Chr. wird auf den ehemaligen cos. et mag. equitum et peditum Eusebius Bezug genommen. Es handelt sich hierbei wohl um den cos. E. von 347, der vielleicht mit dem Vater der Kaiserin Eusebia [1] identisch ist (vgl. Iul. or. 3,107d-110d). PLRE 1, 307f. Eusebius (39). Portmann, Werner (Berlin) [English version] [2] Eusebius Röm. Amtsträger um 355 n. Chr. Sohn von E. [1]. Wie sein Bruder Hypatius wurde er durch seine Schwester Eusebia [1] (vgl. Iul. or. 3,116a) gefö…

Pachomios

(247 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] (Παχώμιος), der 292 n.Chr. wohl in Latopolis/Esna geb. wurde und 346 an der Pest starb, gilt als Begründer des koinobitischen Mönchtums in Äg. und als Verf. der ersten Mönchsregel; koinóbion (im Sinne von koinōnía, “Gemeinschaft”) heißt die von ihm gegr. pachomianische Mönchsgemeinschaft durchgängig in der Vita prima [2. 24]. P. wurde in einer paganen ägypt. Familie geb. und konvertierte anläßlich seiner Einschreibung in die Armee mit etwa zwanzig J. zum Christentum. Nach seiner Rückkehr in das unterägypt. Chenoboskion (“Gän…

Victricius

(190 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[English version] Geb. um 340 n. Chr., beendete zw. 360 und 363 nach seinem Übertritt zum christl. Glauben den Militärdienst (so jedenfalls Paul. Nol. epist. 18,7 mit detaillierter Beschreibung der Umstände) und wurde ca. 380/386 Bischof von Ratomagus (h. Rouen). Aus dieser Zeit sind Briefe des Paulinus [5] von Nola (epist. 18 und 37) und des röm. Bischofs Innocentius I. ([1. Bd. 1, 286]: ein liber regularum) an ihn erhalten. Schwerpunkt seiner Arbeit waren der Kampf gegen die homöische Reichskirchentheologie (Trinität III.; Arianismus), die Förderung des Mö…

Vincentius von Lerinum

(536 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph
[English version] I. Leben Theologe, gest. vor 450 n. Chr. V. von Lerinum (Lérins) starb vor 450 n. Chr., vielleicht um 435. Nach Gennadius (De viris illustribus 65) und Eucherius [3] (De laude heremi 42; Instructiones I, praef. p. 66,5 Wotke) wurde er in Nordfrankreich geb. und verfolgte einen profanen Lebenslauf, bevor er sich vor 427 als Priestermönch auf der kleineren der beiden Inseln Lerinum/Lérins vor Cannes niederließ (Saint-Honorat), die v. a. adligen Flüchtlingen aus Gallien als “Flüchtlingsklos…

Euagrios

(496 words)

Author(s): Rist, Josef (Würzburg) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] [1] Pontikos christl. Schriftsteller und Mönchsvater, 4. Jh. Geistlicher Schriftsteller und Mönchsvater (345-399 n.Chr.). Der im pontischen Ibora geb. Schüler des Gregorios von Nazianz lebte nach Aufenthalten in Konstantinopel (Weihe zum Diakon) und Jerusalem ab 383 als gesuchter spiritueller Ratgeber in der ägypt. Anachoretengemeinschaft der Kellia (Nitrische Wüste). Postum als Origenist verurteilt (553 Konzil von Konstantinopel), sind die wenigen erh. Schriften häufig ps.-epigraphisch …

Gelasios

(392 words)

Author(s): Rist, Josef (Würzburg) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] [1] Bf. von Caesarea [2] Maritima/Palaestina, 4. Jh. Bischof von Caesarea [2] Maritima/Palaestina (gest. vor 400 n.Chr.). Der um 365/367 zum Bischof erhobene Neffe des Kyrillos von Jerusalem nahm am Konzil von Konstantinopel im J. 381 und an der dortigen Synode 394 teil. Auf Wunsch seines Onkels verfaßte G. eine bis 395 reichende Fortsetzung der Kirchengesch. des Eusebios [7] von Kaisareia, welche lange nachwirkte (Gelasios von Kyzikos, hagiographische Viten u.ä.). Teile der verlorenen S…

Apollonius

(148 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] Ein röm. Märtyrer A. ist gemäß der ältesten Überlieferung nach dem Prozeß vor dem stadtröm. Prätorianerpräfekten Tigidius Perennis 184/185 enthauptet worden. Die Quellen bieten ein unterschiedliches Bild: Nach Eusebios, der vermutlich die griech. Akten einsehen konnte, wird A. von seinem Diener denunziert und nach einem Auftritt vor dem Senat hingerichtet (Eus. HE 5,21,2-5). Hieronymus (Vir. ill. 42,1 und Ep. 70,4) bezeichnet ihn als Senator. Die griech. überlieferte Märtyrerakte…

Hegesippos

(835 words)

Author(s): Engels, Johannes (Köln) | Hidber, Thomas (Bern) | Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
(Ἡγήσιππος). [English version] [1] athen. Rhetor und Gesandter, 4. Jh. v. Chr. Sohn des Hegesias aus Sunion, athenischer Rhetor und Gesandter aus reicher Familie. 357/6 v.Chr. beantragte er in der Ekklesia Hilfe für Eretria (IG II2 125 = Tod, 154), 356/5 die athenische Symmachie mit Phokis (Aischin. Ctes. 118; Demosth. or. 19,72-74 mit schol.) und zwischen 346 und 340 weitere Dekrete zur Außenpolitik (Demosth. or. 18,75). Im J. 345 verteidigte er mit seinem Bruder Hegesandros [1] den Timarchos gegen Aischines [2] (Aischin. Tim. 7…

Barnabasbrief

(190 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] Der Verf. des als Brief gerahmten Traktates (CPG I 1050), der zu den sog. Apostelvätern zählt, nennt sich selbst nicht. Die Hss. sowie christl. Theologen des 2./3.Jh. wie Clemens und Origenes (der den Brief als καθολικὴ ἐπιστολή einschätzt: c. Cels. 1,63) geben als Autor den Paulusbegleiter Barnabas an. Der erste Teil (Kap. 2-16) legt die hl. Schrift (= das AT) auf Gott, Christus und das neue Gottesvolk aus; der zweite (17-20) bietet eine “Zwei-Wege-Lehre” und stellt die Christen…

Kyrillos

(1,708 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg) | Rist, Josef (Würzburg) | Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main) | Tosi, Renzo (Bologna) | Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna) | Et al.
[English version] [1] K. von Jerusalem Bf. von Jerusalem, 4. Jh. Um 313 n.Chr. geb., gehörte zum Jerusalemer Klerus (Hier. chron. 2365 [GCS Eus. 7,236,7f. Helm/Treu]) und amtierte von 348 bis 386 als Bischof von Jerusalem; er kam eher als Parteigänger der Homöer (so Hier. l.c., Sokr. 2,38,2 und Soz. 4,20,1) denn als Nizäner (so Theod. hist. eccl. 2,26,6) in dieses Amt. 358 wurde er von Akakios [2] von Kaisareia des Amtes enthoben und nach Tarsos verbannt, 359 rehabilitiert, im folgenden Jahr erneut verbann…

Basileios

(1,213 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg) | Portmann, Werner (Berlin) | Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum) | Leppin, Hartmut (Hannover) | Tinnefeld, Franz (München) | Et al.
(Βασιλεῖος). [English version] [1] B. der Große Theologe und Bf. von Kaisareia/Kappadokien. Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg) [English version] A. Biographie Zusammen mit seinem jüngeren Bruder Gregor von Nyssa und seinem Freund Gregor von Nazianz zählt B. (* um 329/30 als Sohn einer christl. senatorischen Großgrundbesitzerfamilie) zu den sog. drei großen Kappadoziern. Seine Großmutter gab ihm eine erste Einführung in Bibel und Theologie in den Bahnen des Origenismus. Kaisareia/Kappadokien, Konstantinopel und At…

Prohairesios

(148 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] (Προαιρέσιος). Christlicher Sophist (vgl. Zweite Sophistik), wurde ca. 276 n. Chr. in Kaisareia (Kappadokien) als Sohn einer armen. Familie geb. und studierte in Antiocheia [1] bzw. Athen (Eun. vit. soph. 10,3,3-9), wo er dann lange Zeit als gefeierter Lehrer arbeitete und die Kontinuität der dortigen Ausbildung repräsentierte. Offenbar zog er wegen seiner kleinasiat. Herkunft v. a. auch Studenten aus dieser Region des Römischen Reiches an. Durch Constans [1] wurde er mehrfach ge…

Meliton

(249 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
(Μελίτων). [English version] [1] Verf. einer Schrift ›Über die Geschlechter in Athen‹ M. aus Athen (?). Nach fr. 1 (= Harpokr. s.v. κάθετος) Verf. einer Schrift Perí tōn Athḗnēsi génōn (‘Über die Geschlechter in Athen). Datier. unsicher, jedenfalls vor Harpokration [2], der im 1. oder 2. Jh.n.Chr. lebte. Meister, Klaus (Berlin) Bibliography PA 9842  Traill, PAA 639945. [English version] [2] Tragiker, 1. Jh. Griech. Tragiker des 1. Jh.n.Chr. (TrGF I 182); als Titel ist ‘Niobe bezeugt. Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) [English version] [3] M. von Sardeis Bf. von Sardeis, 2. Jh. Von de…

Episkopos, Episkopoi

(1,487 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] [1] Bezeichnung für griech. Beamte Im Wortsinn heißt epískopos soviel wie “Aufseher”. Im griech. Bereich war e. eine Bezeichnung für Beamte, ähnlich den epimelētaí und epistátai , jedoch weniger häufig gebraucht. Im Delisch-Attischen Seebund wurden Epískopoi als athenische Beamte in verbündete Städte geschickt, um etwa eine demokratische Verfassung einzurichten (Erythrai: ML 40; vgl. auch Aristoph. Av. 1021-1034). E. sind unter den Beamten in Rhodos (Syll.3 619), Massilia bestellte einen e. für seine Kolonie Nikaia (ILS 6761) und Mithridates VI. s…

Gregorios

(2,040 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg) | Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum) | Touwaide, Alain (Madrid)
[English version] [1] Thaumaturgos Anwalt und Theologe, 3. Jh. G. wurde zw. 210 und 213 n.Chr. als Sohn einer begüterten paganen Familie in Neokaisareia/ Pontos (h. Niksar) geb., wohl unter dem Namen Theodoros. Nach gründlicher Elementarbildung wollte G. 232/3 (oder 239) eigentlich in Berytos/Beirut Jura studieren, lernte freilich zuvor in Caesarea [2] (Palaestina) den dort lehrenden Origenes kennen und studierte daraufhin bei ihm “christl. Wissenschaften” (zunächst Dialektik, Physiologie, Ethik, Philos.…

Eustathios

(984 words)

Author(s): Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald) | Brisson, Luc (Paris) | Vassis, Ioannis (Athen) | Rist, Josef (Würzburg) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
(Εὐστάθιος). [English version] [1] aus Karien Rhetor, consularis Syriae, 4. Jh. Rhetor des 4. Jh. n.Chr.; studierte in Athen und ließ sich später in Tyros nieder. In der kaiserl. Verwaltung bekleidete er mehrere Ämter, die er zu seiner Bereicherung nutzte (u.a.: rationalis summarum per orientem), 388 war er consularis Syriae. Mit Libanios war er zunächst befreundet (Lobrede: Lib. or. 44), später verfeindet (Schmährede: or. 54, vgl. auch or. 1,271-275). Andere Zeugnisse als Libanios gibt es nicht. Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald) [English version] [2] neuplaton. Philosoph …

Markos

(1,065 words)

Author(s): Wick, Peter (Basel) | Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) | Wermelinger, Otto (Fribourg) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
(Μάρκος). [English version] [1] der Evangelist (lat. Marcus). Der Verf. des zweiten Evangeliums (Mk) könnte ein im NT vor allem im Umfeld des Paulus (Apg 12,12.25; Phm 24 u.a.) oft genannter Missionar (Iohannes) M. sein (so zuerst Papias um 130 n.Chr., s. Eus. HE 3,39,15). Dagegen spricht, daß eine Nähe zur paulinischen Theologie kaum nachgewiesen werden kann [3], dafür aber die Einfachheit dieser Annahme, da die biographischen Angaben und die angenommene Abfassungszeit übereinstimmen [1]. Der griech.…

Hadrianos

(520 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
(Ἁδριανός). [English version] [1] Sophist aus Tyros, 2. Jh. Sophist aus Tyros, mit 18 Jahren ein Lieblingsschüler des Herodes Atticus (Philostr. soph. 2,10,585-586). Mit Flavius Boëthos (ebenfalls aus Phönizien) besuchte er 162-166 n.Chr. die Anatomievorlesungen von Galenos in Rom (Gal. 14,627; 629 Kuhn). Vielleicht war er Ziel des Spotts in Lukians Pseudologístēs [1]. Er lehrte in Ephesos (Philostr. soph. 2,23,605) und ehrte dort (163-169) [2] seinen Patron, den Consular Cn. Claudius [II 64] Severus, mit einer Statue und einem Gedicht [3; 4]. S…

Nikolaos

(1,607 words)

Author(s): Ameling, Walter (Jena) | Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg) | Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum)
(Νικόλαος). [English version] [1] Stratege Ptolemaios' IV. in Koile-Syria, 219 v.Chr. Aitoler, stratēgós Ptolemaios' IV. in Koile-Syria, belagerte 219 v.Chr. vergeblich den abtrünnigen Theodotos in Ptolemais, verhinderte aber die Einschließung von Dora durch Antiochos [5] III. Im J. 218 zum Oberkommandierenden gemacht, besetzte er den Küstenpaß nördl. von Sidon, wurde aber von Antiochos am Damurasfluß zurückgeworfen. N. ging dann wohl zu Antiochos über, den er 209…

Polykarpos von Smyrna

(471 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
(Πολύκαρπος). [English version] I. Leben P. gehört zu den wichtigsten Gestalten der zweiten Generation christl. Lehrer, die noch Kontakt zu den Personen der ersten, “apostolischen” hatten (Eirenaios [2] nach Eus. HE 5,20,6). In den Briefen des Ignatios [1] wird er als “Bischof von Smyrna” bezeichnet (Ignatios, Epistula ad Magnesios 15), ein weiterer Brief ist an den Bischof P. selbst adressiert ( Epistula ad Polycarpum). Offenbar galt er nicht nur als Repräsentant der kleinasiat. Gemeinden, sondern auch als Hüter der unverfälschten apostolischen Trad. Als s…

Abgarlegende

(314 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg)
[English version] Die A. ist ein pseudepigrapher Briefwechsel zw. Jesus von Nazareth und dem König Abgar V. Ukkāmā (= dem Schwarzen; Tac. ann. 12,12,2) von Edessa, der zw. 4 v. und 50 n. Chr. das Königreich von Osroene regierte. Die älteste Fassung bei Eusebios, der die Briefe dem edessenischen Archiv entnommen und aus dem Syr. übersetzt haben will (h.e. 1,13,6-21). Danach hat A. von den Heilungen Jesu gehört und lädt ihn nach Edessa ein, um von ihm geheilt zu werden. Jesus preist in seiner Antwor…

Hesychios

(1,189 words)

Author(s): Tosi, Renzo (Bologna) | Markschies, Christoph (Heidelberg) | Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum) | Tinnefeld, Franz (München)
[English version] [1] alex. Gelehrter, Verf. eines Lex. Alexandrinischer Gelehrter, Verf. eines alphabetisch angeordneten Lex., das uns zahlreiche Frg. (v.a. von Dichtung) überliefert, die Wiedergewinnung zahlreicher Textvarianten ermöglicht und eine bes. Bedeutung für das Studium der ant. Klassikerexegese sowie der Dialekte und der Gesch. der griech. Sprache einnimmt. Für die Datierung grundlegend ist die das Lex. einführende Epistula ad Eulogium: Manche Gelehrte setzen den Adressaten mit Eulogios Scholastikos (5. Jh. n.Chr.) gleich, andere, darunter L…

Episkopos, Episkopoi

(1,802 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) | Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] [1] Greek official The lexical meaning of epískopos equates to ‘supervisor’. In the Greek world, episkopos habitually referred to an official, similar to   epimelētaí and   epistátai , but used less frequently. The Delian League sent epískopoi, who were Athenian officials, into allied cities, e.g. in order to set up a democratic constitution (Erythrae: ML 40; cf. Aristoph. Av. 1021-1034). Rhodian officials also included episkopoi (Syll.3 619), Massilia appointed an episkopos for its colony of Nicaea (ILS 6761), and Mithridates VI sent one to Ephesus …

Agape

(299 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] (ἀγάπη; agápē) In the NT (Jud 12) agápē is also used for the ‘love feast’ if it is an occasion of brotherly love (Tert. Apol. 39,16: agápē is equal to dilectio). Tertullian described a communal meal of the congregation comparable to ancient sacral meals. Since  Ignatius ( c. AD 110) admonished the community in Smyrna not to hold the agape without the bishop, he was probably referring to a joint celebration of the Eucharist with the ordinary meal as documented by Paul for Corinth (1 Cor 11,20-34) and which was in part custom until the 5th …

Antiochene School

(216 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] This modern name describes a group of theologians who worked as exegetes. A true bond as a school can only be demonstrated for theologians who temporarily resided in Antiochia between c. 350 and c. 430, e.g.,  Diodorus of Tarsus, his students  Theodorus of Mopsuestia,  Iohannes Chrysostomos and their (?) student  Theodoretus of Cyrrhus. The characteristics of this school are apparent in its exegetical work, such as the methodological prologues of a commentary on the Psalms attributed to Diodorus (CPG 2,3818): int…

Macarius

(751 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum) | Markschies, Christoph (Berlin) | Schindler, Alfred (Heidelberg)
(Μακάριος; Makários). I. Greek [German version] [1] Spartiate, in 426/5 BC in the council of war of Eurylochus Spartiate, in 426/5 BC he took part in the council of war of Eurylochus [2] in the campaign of the armed forces of Spartan allies against Naupactus and the Acarnanians and fell in battle at Olpae (Thuc. 3,100,2; 109,1). Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum) Bibliography J. Roisman, The General Demosthenes and his Use of Military Surprise, 1993, 27ff. [German version] [2] M. of Alexandria Monk, 4th cent. AD According to the Historia monachorum in Aegypto [1. § 23], a certain M. (4th …

Carmen contra paganos

(123 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] The Parisian Cod. Lat. 8084 of Prudentius transmits in fol. 156r-158v 122 v. an anonymous defamatory poem (CPL 1431), directed against a praefectus ( urbis or praetorio orientis), presumably Virius Nicomachus  Flavianus [2] the Elder, but alternatively perhaps  Vettius Agorius Praetextatus. The text is not only a Christian reaction to the pagan Roman renaissance under  Symmachus, but also a testimony of the Christian reception of Virgil. The Carmen contra paganos belongs to the genre of apologetic poetry, and makes interesting references to the pag…

Fortunat(ian)us

(124 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] F., an African, held office in 342-368/370 as bishop of  Aquileia. According to Jerome he wrote a gospel commentary Titulis ordinatis brevi sermone rusticoque (Jer. Vir. ill. 97,1) under Constantius [2] II (337-361). Perhaps three smaller fragments have been preserved (CPL 104); Jerome used the work for his own Matthew commentary (Praef.: PL 26,200 and Ep. 10,3). F. received  Athanasius in Aquileia in 345 but then pressured  Liberius of Rome to be lenient towards the Homoean movement ( Arianism) under e…

Apollinarius

(377 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin) | Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum) | Degani, Enzo (Bologna)
[German version] [1] Forms of the name The following are attested: Apollinaris or Ἀπολινάριος ( Apolinários) or Ἀπολεινάριος ( Apoleinários), but not  Ἀπολλινάριος ( Apollinários). Markschies, Christoph (Berlin) Bibliography Th. Zahn, Apollinaris, Apollinarius, Apolinarius, in: id., Paralipomena, Forsch. zur Gesch. des nt. Kanons 5/1, 1893, 99-109. [German version] [2] of Laodicea Priest and teacher of grammar Priest and teacher of grammar. According to Sozom. Hist. eccl. (2,46; 3,15-16; 5,18; 6,25) the father of  A. [3]. Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum) Bibliography J. Dräseke…

Priscillianus, Priscillianism

(1,193 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
Spanish ascetic and Christian theologian of Late Antiquity; term used for the ascetic movement he founded. [German version] I. Life of Priscillianus and history of Priscillianism A great deal of P.' biography remains unknown and has been distorted by a hostile tradition. P. was probably born prior to AD 350; he is believed to have been from a wealthy Spanish family. His training in rhetoric indicates an education befitting his class. In connection with his decision to lead an ascetic life, he chose to be baptized as an a…

Pacianus

(130 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] After AD 343, bishop of Barcinona (modern Barcelona), died before 393; of his life practically nothing is known. Three letters from him to the Novatian Sympronianus survive, in which he opposes Novatianism (Novatianus) (CPL 561), also a pamphlet Paraenesis sive Exhortatorius Libellus ad Paenitentiam ( Exhortation to Penitence, CPL 562) and a Sermo de Baptismo ( Sermon on Baptism, CPL 563). A Cerv(ul)us ('Stag') against the pagan celebration of the new year, mentioned by Hieronymus  (Vir. ill. 106), is lost. The author was well educated and t…

Lucianus

(4,158 words)

Author(s): Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) | Markschies, Christoph (Berlin) | Leppin, Hartmut (Hannover)
(Λουκιανός; Loukianós). [German version] [1] L. of Samosata Greek rhetorical-satirical writer, 2nd cent. AD Important Greek rhetorical-satirical writer of the Roman Imperial period. Nesselrath, Heinz-Günther (Göttingen) [German version] A. Life and career L. was born between AD 115 and 125 [4. 8] in Samosata on the Euphrates, on the eastern edge of Roman Syria. Περὶ τοῦ ἐνυπνίου ἦτοι Βίος Λουκιανοῦ (‘The Dream, or Lucian's Life’, Somn.) portrays vividly (but not necessarily truthfully) L.'s decision for an education modelled on the example of the great classical authors ( paideía)…

Faustinus

(309 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Fuhrer, Therese (Zürich) | Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] [1] see Faustulus See Faustulus. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [2] Wealthy friend of the poet Martial Wealthy friend of the poet Martial, who dedicated bks. 3 (3,2) and 4 (4,10) to him; he owned villae in Baiae (3,58), Tibur (4,57), Tarracina (10,51,8) and Trebula (5,71). PIR2 F 127. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) [German version] [3] Governor, in AD 273, of the province of Belgica under Esuvius [1] Tetricus Governor, probably in AD 273, of the province of Belgica under Esuvius [1] Tetricus; according to Polemius Silvius (Chron. Min.…

Theodorus

(7,286 words)

Author(s): Knell, Heiner (Darmstadt) | Folkerts, Menso (Munich) | Baumhauer, Otto A. (Bremen) | Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Blume, Horst-Dieter (Münster) | Et al.
[German version] I Greek (Θεόδωρος; Theódōros). [German version] [I 1] Of Samos, Greek architect, bronze sculptor and inventor, Archaic period Multitalented Greek inventor, architect, bronze sculptor and metal worker ( toreutḗs; Toreutics) of the Archaic period from Samos (for the occupational image cf. architect). His father was Telecles (Hdt. 3,41; Paus. 8,14,8; 10,38,6) or according to other sources (Diog. Laert. 2,103; Diod. Sic. 1,98) Rhoecus [3]; his name is so frequently mentioned in conjunction with the latter that …

Cyrillus

(1,862 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin) | Rist, Josef (Würzburg) | Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main) | Tosi, Renzo (Bologna) | Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna) | Et al.
(Κύριλλος; Kýrillos) [German version] [1] C. of Jerusalem Bishop Born c. AD 313, he was a member of the Jerusalem clergy (Jer. Chron. 2365 [GCS Eus. 7,236,7f. Helm/Treu]), and from 348 to 386 served as bishop of Jerusalem; he came to this office rather as a follower of the Homoeans (cf. Jer. loc. cit., Socr. 2,38,2 and Sozom. Hist. eccl. 4,20,1) than as a Nicaean (cf. Theod. Hist. eccl. 2,26,6). In 358 he was relieved of his office by  Acacius [2] of Caesarea and banished to Tarsus, rehabilitated in 359 a…

Athenagoras

(198 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] (Ἀθηναγόρας; Athēnagóras) From Athens (2nd cent. AD). From this author surely comes an apologia bearing the inscription πρεσβεία ( presbeía) to the Emperors  Marcus Aurelius and  Commodus (CPG I 1070; [1]); whether the work mentioned at the end of this text, about the resurrection (§ 37), is identical to the one handed down in Paris. graec. 451 (CPG I 1071), is controversial. In addition to critical voices, which attribute this identification as well as the statement ‘Philosopher from Athens’ in the…

Proaeresius

(154 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] (Προαιρέσιος/ Pro(h)airésios). Christian Sophist (cf. Second Sophistic), born c. AD 276 in Caesarea (Cappadocia) to an Armenian family; studied in Antioch [1] and Athens (Eunap. VS 10,3,3-9), where he was subsequently a celebrated teacher for many years, reflecting the continuity of the education provided there. His provenience from Asia Minor apparently attracted students particularly from that part of the Roman Empire. Constans [1] honoured him numerous times; as a Christian, he did not…

Meliton

(285 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) | Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
(Μελίτων; Melítōn). [German version] [1] Author of a text called "On the Clans in Athens" M. from Athens (?). According to fr. 1 (= Harpocr. s.v. κάθετος) author of a text called Perì tôn Athḗnēsi génōn (‘On the Clans in Athens). Date uncertain, in any case before Harpocratio [2], who lived in the first or second century A.D. Meister, Klaus (Berlin) Bibliography PA 9842 Traill, PAA 639945. [German version] [2] Tragedian, 1st cent. Greek author of tragedies (TrGF I 182); there is evidence of a work called ‘Niobe. Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) [German version] [3] M. of Sardes Bishop of…

Christian Palestinian language and literature

(627 words)

Author(s): Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
[German version] A. Language Christian Palestinian is a dialect of  Aramaic, more precisely of Western Aramaic, to which belong Nabataean, Palmyrenian, Judaeo-Aramaic, Samaritan and the still extant New Western Aramaic (Maalūla linguistic enclave near Damascus, Syria). As it uses one of the older Syriac- (i.e. Estrangelō, in reality στρογγύλη; stroggýlē) related scripts, in the non-German language area it tends to be called Syro-Palestinian, although it lies closer to the Judaeo-Palestinian Aramaic of some targumim than to classical Syriac. It was evidently used in…

Theology and the Christian Church

(24,325 words)

Author(s): Merkt, Andreas (Mainz) | Sj, Lothar Lies | Markschies, Christoph (Berlin) | Hafner, Jochen
Merkt, Andreas (Mainz) I. History of Theology (CT) [German version] A. Basic Concept (CT) The history of theology (HT) is that area of theological studies which examines the history of the development of theological ideas. The need for this study in the theory of Christianity arises principally from theological and anthropological considerations. First, according to Christian belief, God himself took on an historical form in Jesus of Nazareth; scholarly reflection on this religion demands, therefore, an hist…
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