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Unbelief

(1,677 words)

Author(s): Schulz, Heiko
[German Version] I. Philosophy The term unbelief may be used either descriptively and neutrally or evaluatively (usually pejoratively). In either case, its grammar is dependent on the concept of belief or faith. This grammar comprises two structural elements: one objective (“believe something,” “believe that p”), the other subjective (“ believe something,” “ believe that p,” in the sense of believing that an envisaged situation is true). The basic forms of unbelief can be derived from these two elements: nescience is neither

Interiority

(684 words)

Author(s): Schulz, Heiko
[German Version] I The term interiority or inwardness (Ger. Innerlichkeit) was used by F.G. Klopstock and J.W. v. Goethe, but it was only in G.W.F. Hegel that it gained the interpretive configuration that subsequently became definitive: first, and in the widest sense, the term refers to the subjectivity or the immediate being-within-one's self of the spirit (III). Wherever there is spirit, there is interiority, and vice versa, for interiority is nothing other than the spirit's “returning into itself” ( Philosophie der Geschichte, 340). Second, thus defined the term serves as…

Verification/Falsification

(1,790 words)

Author(s): Bartelborth, Thomas | Keuth, Herbert | Schulz, Heiko
[German Version] I. Natural Sciences

Anxiety and Fear

(1,909 words)

Author(s): Michaels, Axel | Ringleben, Joachim | Schulz, Heiko | Loder, James E.
[German Version] I. Religious Studies – II. Philosophy – III. Philosophy of Religion – IV. Practical Theology

Faith

(25,125 words)

Author(s): Grünschloß, Andreas | Schulz, Heiko | Kaiser, Otto | Hooker, Morna D. | Jüngel, Eberhard | Et al.
[German Version] I. Terminology – II. Old Testament – III. New Testament – IV. Systematic Theology – V. Practical Theology – VI. Judaism – VII. Islam I. Terminology 1. Religious Studies a. As an emic linguistic term, “faith” is found not only in the context of the Christian West (cf. fides, foi, Glaube, etc.), but also in other religious traditions. The Sanskrit term śraddhā (cf. Pāli saddhā; Avestan zrazdā-) seems to represent an Indo-European etymological pendant to Lat. credo, as demonstrated by the possible reconstruction of Indo-Germanic * k'red-dhē-, “set one's heart on” (Köhler; Smith, 1979). Hinduism. The term śraddhā, however, has many meanings, including an eager readiness to make donations and a “longing for the desired goods” (in the context of Vedic offerings; Vedas), “acknowledging as true” in the sense of hermeneutical agreement with religious doctrine or teachers (cf.