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Alexander historians

(302 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] Collective name for the ancient authors, who wrote about the history and biography of  Alexander [4] (the Great).  Callisthenes was his court historian and fulfilled the duties expected of him until their quarrel. Many of the later histories are based on his, which was published right away (until 330 BC?). Of the eyewitnesses, only  Ptolemaeus and  Aristoboulus [7] seem to have described all campaigns; both praised Alexander. They wrote many years later, used Callisthenes and prob…

Mazarus

(67 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Μάζαρος; Mázaros). Hetaîros ( hetaîroi ) of Alexander [4] the Great. According to Arrian (Arr. Anab. 3,16,9), he was appointed fortress commander in Susa in 331/30 BC. Curtius (5,2,16) names Xenophilus instead. Since the name M. is Iranian, Arrian probably confused him with the Persian predecessor. Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography A. B. Bosworth, A Historical Commentary on Arrian's History, vol. 1, 1980, 319.

Bucephalus, Bucephalas

(115 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Βουκεφάλας; Boukephálas). Thessalian warhorse, a gift to  Alexander [4] as a boy. He was allegedly the only person capable of breaking him in. He never rode any other and it is illustrated with him in heroic style on the  Alexander Mosaic and the  Alexander Sarcophagus. B. died at a great age after the battle on the Hydaspes and Alexander founded a city,  Bucephala in his honour. The life and death of B. are richly embellished in the ‘Vulgate’ ( Alexander historians) and in the  Alexander Romance. Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography A. R. Anderson, Bucephalas an…

Gorgus

(126 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Γόργος; Górgos). In 324 BC, G. of Iasos ─ in the role of the ‘keeper of weapons’ ( hoplophýlax, ὁπλοφύλαξ) ─ interceded with  Alexander [4] the Great on behalf of the Samians expelled by the Athenians and tried to persuade Alexander to start a campaign against Athens (Ath. 12,538b). After the latter's death, G. had Iasos allow the return of Samians to Athens at the city's expense. The newly created community of Samos honoured him and his brother  Minnion for their merits by granting them citizenship among other things (Syll.3 312). The brothers had succeeded in obtai…

Agathocles

(1,543 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) | Ameling, Walter (Jena) | Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki) | Et al.
(Ἀγαθοκλῆς; Agathoklês) [German version] [1] of Athens Archon 357/56 BC Archon 357/56 BC (Dem. Or. 47,44; Diod. Sic. 16,9). Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) [German version] [2] Tyrant King of Syracuse (316-288 BC) Later king of Syracuse, born 361/0 BC in Thermae in Sicily. Son of Carcinus, who had been banned from Rhegium, and who under  Timoleon had received citizenship in Syracuse and had a pottery manufactory. A. had an adventurous youth, participated in several martial undertakings and early on fostered broad-reaching politica…

Thersippus

(102 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Θέρσιππος; Thérsippos). Participant in Alexander [4] the Great's campaign. Alexander sent him from Marathus to Darius [3] in 333/2 with a reply to his first offer of peace (Arr. An. 2,14,4; Curt. 4,1,14); perhaps identical with the T. who after Alexander's death is honoured in a decree by the Nesiotae [2] (OGIS 4) (see [1. vol. 1,369; vol. 2.2,376]). Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography 1 G. A. Droysen, Gesch. des Hellenismus, 3 vols., 21877/8 (reprint of this ed. 1952/3, ed. by E. Bayer, 1980) 2 Berve, No. 368 3 E. Poddighe, Il decreto dell'isola di Nes…

Peithon

(377 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
(Πείθων; Peíthōn). [German version] [1] Indo- Greek satrap In 325 BC, P., son of Agenor, was appointed by Alexander [4] the Great as the satrap for the coast of India and the banks of the Indus as far as the mouth of the Acesines. He took Musicanus prisoner and brought him before the king, manned the new fortresses on the left bank of the Indus and met up with Alexander at Pattala. When Alexander had to give up a large part of India in 323 BC, he transferred P. to Gandhara (Gandaritis), a move which was…

Pythionice

(90 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Πυθιονίκη/ Pythioníkē). Famous hetaera (Hetaerae), probably Athenian, mocked by comedians (Ath. 8,339). Called c. 329 BC by Harpalus to Babylon, where she bore him a daughter (Plut. Phocion 22,1), he showered her with plundered treasures (Diod. Sic. 17, 108,5). After her death, Harpalus had her deified as Aphrodite P. Her grave monuments in Babylon and Athens are often mentioned (mostly with indignation) (as in Ath. 13,594d-595c; Paus. 1,37,5; Plut. Phocion 22, 1-2). They allegedly cost more than 200 talents (Theopomp. apud Ath. ibid.). Badian, Ernst (Cambridge…

Balacrus

(208 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
(Βάλακρος; Bálakros). Various men with this name served as officers under Alexander [4] the Great. [German version] [1] Satrap of Cilicia, after 333 BC Son of a certain Nicanor, married Phila, daughter of  Antipater [1], who bore him a son. First   somatophýlax , after the battle of Issus, was appointed satrap of Cilicia, where he fought with great success against the mountain tribes, but fell in battle shortly before Alexander's death. Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography Berve 2, no. 200 Heckel 260. [German version] [2] Commander of the Greek allied infantry from 334/33 BC Son of …

Hippostratus

(186 words)

Author(s): Schulte-Altedorneburg, Jörg (Marburg) | Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) | Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin)
(Ἱππόστρατος; Hippóstratos). [German version] [1] Seducer of Periboea Son of Amarynceus who seduced  Periboea, daughter of Hipponous (Apollod. 1,74; Hes. fr. 12 M-W). Schulte-Altedorneburg, Jörg (Marburg) [German version] [2] Nephew of Attalus [1] Nephew of  Attalus [1], brother of  Cleopatra, after whose death he was executed by  Alexander [4] the Great (cf. Iust. 11,5,1); not to be identified with other men by the same name. Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography Berve 2, no. 390. [German version] [3] H. Soter Indo-Greek king in Gandhara in the 1st cent. BC One of the later I…

Aristus

(28 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] From Salamis, Late Hellenistic  Alexander historian, invented a Roman delegation to which  Alexander [4] prophesied Rome's future greatness (FGrH 143). Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)

Nicaea

(1,521 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle) | Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) | Dreyer, Boris (Göttingen) | Daverio Rocchi, Giovanna (Milan) | Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt) | Et al.
(Νίκαια; Níkaia). [German version] [1] Naiad Naiad, daughter of the Phrygian river god Sangarius and the goddess Cybele. As a huntress, N. spurns love and remains a virgin. In Memnon of Heracleia, she does not yield to Dionysus and so he resorts to a ruse and turns into wine the spring from which N. is accustomed to drinking. She becomes drunk and falls asleep. Dionysus overpowers her in her sleep and fathers with her 'satyrs and others' (Memnon FGrH 434 F 41, 8f.). In Nonnus, Dion. 15,169-16,405, the…

Olympias

(742 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) | Nutton, Vivian (London) | Leppin, Hartmut (Hannover) | Brändle, Rudolf (Basle) | Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim)
(Ὀλυμπιάς; Olympiás). [German version] [1] Daughter of Neoptolemus Daughter of Neoptolemus [2], born in about 375 BC. She was not given the name O. until after the Olympic victory of Philippus II in 356 BC (cf. Plut. Mor. 401b). She married Philip in 357 as his fifth wife (Ath. 13,557b) and bore him Alexander [4] the Great (356) and Cleopatra [II 3]. The birth of a successor elevated O.'s status, but there is no evidence of any political influence. After Philip's marriage to Cleopatra [II 2] she fled to…

Laomedon

(589 words)

Author(s): Stoevesandt, Magdalene (Basle) | Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
(Λαομέδων; Laomédōn, ‘Ruler of the People’). [German version] [1] Mythical king of Troy Mythical king of Troy, son of Ilus [1]. Sons: Priamus, Hicetaon, Clytius [ I4], Lampus, Tithonus (Hom. Il. 20,236ff.), the illegitimate Bucolion (ibid. 6,23), and according to Ilias parva 29,4 PEG I Ganymede [1] as well. Daughters: Antigone [4], Astyoche [2], Hesione [4], etc. The main sources for his story (diverging in the details) are Homer (Il. 5,640ff.; 7,452f.; 20,145ff.; 21,441ff.), Apollodorus (2,103f.; 1…

Erigyius

(116 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Ἐρίγυιος; Erígyios). From Mytilene, resident of Amphipolis together with his brother  Laomedon, older than Alexander [4] and was banished in 337/6 BC together with others of his friends from younger days. As the only one of this group he was quickly given a command over troops, led the Greek cavalry near  Issus and  Gaugamela, and later appears as a trusted adviser of the king. He also took on special military tasks, thus e.g. against  Satibarzanes, whom he killed in single combat…

Amicitia

(392 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] Amicitia and amicus include also in the Latin personal, philosophical and social-political aspects of friendship. The use of amicitia as an expression of social and political relationships between individuals or states and their introduction under Greek influence ( philia,  Friendship) occurred in philosophy through Cicero, which also allows familiaris to become an unforced designation for a ‘friend’. Amicus and amicitia express within Rome the relationship between high-ranking people of the same rank as well as the connection between the…

Antigenes

(291 words)

Author(s): Robbins, Emmet (Toronto) | Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
(Ἀντιγένης; Antigénēs). [German version] [1] Dithyrambic poet Attic dithyrambic poet, presumably the author of an inscription on a tripod for the victory of the phyle  Acamantis in the dithyrambic competition in the Dionysia (FGE 11-15). The sources (Anth. Pal. 13,28) ascribe the epigram to ‘Simonides or Bacchylides’, but Hecker emphatically recognized Antigenes as the author; he calls himself the χοροδιδάσκαλος [1.149-152]; the χορηγός and αὐλητής are also mentioned. In order to put the names into verse, an unusual metre is used. The date is perhaps c. 485 BC. [2]. Robbins, Emmet (…

Sosthenes

(158 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Σωσθένης/ Sōsthénēs). Macedonian noble. After the death of Ptolemaeus [2] Ceraunus his brother Meleager [5] became king of Macedonia at the beginning of 279 BC, but was deposed just two months later. It became apparent that his successor Antipater, nephew of Cassander, was no match for the Celts and after 45 days he was expelled by S., who managed to overcome the Celtic danger. S. rejected the title of king that was then offered to him and ruled as a stratēgós . When Brennus [2] invaded, Macedonia was again plundered; but when the Celts mov…

Docimus

(102 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Δόκιμος; Dókimos). Appointed satrap of Babylon by  Perdiccas in 323 BC (Arr. Succ. 24,3-5). Condemned after Perdiccas' death, he fled to Asia Minor and supported  Alcetas [4] and  Attalus [2] against  Eumenes. Defeated along with his allies by  Antigonus Monophthalmus and imprisoned in a fortress, he betrayed them in an escape attempt and went over to Antigonus (Diod. Sic. 19,16), who quickly promoted him. In Phrygia he founded a city Dokimeion. In 302 he allied himself with Lysimachus (Diod. Sic. 20,107,3). His later history is unknown. Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, …

Cleopatra

(4,237 words)

Author(s): Prescendi, Francesca (Geneva) | Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) | Ameling, Walter (Jena) | Stegmann, Helena (Bonn) | Mehl, Andreas (Halle/Saale) | Et al.
(Κλεοπάτρα; Kleopátra, Lat. Cleopatra). I. Mythology [German version] [I 1] Daughter of Boreas and Oreithyia Daughter of  Boreas and  Oreithyia, first wife of  Phineus. C. was rejected in favour of  Idaea [3], whom Phineus married as his second wife; her sons were blinded (Apollod. 3.200; Hyg. Fab. 18). Prescendi, Francesca (Geneva) [German version] [I 2] Daughter of Idas and Marpessa Daughter of  Idas and  Marpessa, wife of  Meleager. After her abduction by Apollo she was also called ‘Alcyone’ after her mother's …
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