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Metron

(62 words)

Peucestas

(257 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
(Πευκέστας; Peukéstas). [German version] [1] Commander of the occupation of Egypt under Alexander the Great Son of Macartatus, he and Balacrus [2] were commanders of the garrison in Egypt under Alexander [4] the Great (Arr. An. 3,5,5, 331 BC). In the  Saqqara necropolis a decree by P. for the protection of a priestly estate has been found. Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography E.G. Turner, A Commander-in-Chief's Order from Saqqâra, in: JEA 60, 1974, 239-342. [German version] [2] Trierarch of Alexander the Great's Hydaspes fleet Son of Alexander from Mieza, in 326 BC triera…

Alexander historians

(302 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] …

Mazarus

(67 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Μάζαρος; Mázaros). Hetaîros ( hetaîroi ) of Alexander [4] the Great. According to Arrian (Arr. Anab. 3,16,9), he was appointed fortress commander in Susa in 331/30 BC. Curtius (5,2,16) names Xenophilus instead. Since the name M. is Iranian, Arrian probably confused him with the Persian predecessor. Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography A. B. Bosworth, A Historical Commentary on Arrian's History, vol. 1, 1980, 319.

Bucephalus, Bucephalas

(115 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Βουκεφάλας; Boukephálas). Thessalian warhorse, a gift to  Alexander [4] as a boy. He was allegedly the only person capable of breaking him in. He never rode any other and it is illustrated with him in heroic style on the  Alexander Mosaic and the  Alexander Sarcophagus. B. died at a great age after the battle on the Hydaspes and Alexander founded a city,  Bucephala in his honour. The life and death of B. are richly embellished in the ‘Vulgate’ ( Alexander historians) and in the  Alexander Romance. Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography A. R. Anderson, Bucephalas an…

Gorgus

(126 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Γόργος; Górgos). In 324 BC, G. of Iasos ─ in the role of the ‘keeper of weapons’ ( hoplophýlax, ὁπλοφύλαξ) ─ interceded with  Alexander [4] the Great on behalf of the Samians expelled by the Athenians and tried to persuade Alexander to start a campaign against Athens (Ath. 12,538b). After the latter's death, G. had Iasos allow the return of Samians to Athens at the city's expense. The newly created community of Samos honoured him and his brother  Minnion for their merits by granting them citizenship among other things (Syll.…

Thersippus

(102 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Θέρσιππος; Thérsippos). Participant in Alexander [4] the Great's campaign. Alexander sent him from Marathus to Darius [3] in 333/2 with a reply to his first offer of peace (Arr. An. 2,14,4; Curt. 4,1,14); perhaps identical with the T. who after Alexander's death is honoured in a decree by the Nesiotae [2] (OGIS 4) (see [1. vol. 1,369; vol. 2.2,376]). Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography 1 G. A. Droysen, Gesch. des Hellenismus, 3 vols., 21877/8 (reprint of this ed. 1952/3, ed. by E. Bayer, 1980) 2 Berve, No. 368 3 E. Poddighe, Il decreto dell'isola di Nes…

Peithon

(377 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
(Πείθων; Peíthōn). [German version] [1] Indo- Greek satrap In 325 BC, P., son of Agenor, was appointed by Alexander [4] the Great as the satrap for the coast of India and the banks of the Indus as far as the mouth of the Acesines. He took Musicanus prisoner and brought him before the king, manned the new fortresses on the left bank of the Indus and met up with Alexander at Pattala. When Alexander had to give up a large part of India in 323 BC, he transferred P. to Gandhara (Gandaritis), a move which was endorsed by Perdiccas [4] and, afte…

Myllenas

(59 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Μυλλένας; Myllénas). Scribe of Alexander [4] the Great, was to lead lightly armed infantry along by-ways to the summit of the Aornus [2] (Curt. 8,11,5: Mullinus). The enterprise failed. He is probably the Macedonian M., son of Asander, who was accorded the proxenía with privileges in Eretria (IG XII 9, 197). Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)

Bagoas

(192 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
(Βαγώας; Bagṓas), Greek name for Persian eunuchs (Plin. HN 13,41). [German version] [1] Commander of Artaxerxes Ochus, 338 BC ‘An extremely impudent and sacrilegious man’ (Diod. Sic. 16,47,4) who took part in the renewed conquest of Egypt led by  Artaxerxes Ochus, became commander-in-chief of the Upper Satrapies, then  chiliarchos (‘lord of the realm’ Diod. Sic. 16,50,8). In 338 BC, he poisoned the king, in 336, he poisoned the king's son and successor  Arses, and installed a courtier on the throne, who then adopt…

Barsaentes

(69 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Βαρσαέντης; Barsaéntēs). Under  Darius satrap of Arachosia and Drangiana; commanded the Arachotes and the neighbouring Indians in the battle of Gaugamela. He murdered Darius in mid 330 BC together with  Bessus and  Nabarzanes, then fled to his satrapy and from there to India. When  Alexander [4] reached the Indus, B. was handed over to him and executed. Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography Berve 2, no. 205.

Lanice

(73 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Λανίκη/ Laníkē; probably a short form of Ἑλλανίκη, Hellaníkē, Curt. 8,1,21). Sister of Cleitus [6], wet-nurse of Alexander [4], who allegedly plaintively called on her after Cleitus' death (Arr. Anab. 4,9,3f.; Curt. 8,2,8f.). L.'s husband is unknown. Two of her sons fell at Miletus, one - Proteas - became famous as a drinking-companion of Alexander (Ath. 4,129a; Ael. VH 12,26). Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography Berve, no. 462, cf. no. 664.

Balacrus

(208 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
(Βάλακρος; Bálakros). Various men with this name served as officers under Alexander [4] the Great. [German version] [1] Satrap of Cilicia, after 333 BC Son of a certain Nicanor, married Phila, daughter of  Antipater [1], who bore him a son. First   somatophýlax , after the battle of Issus, was appointed satrap of Cilicia, where he fought with great success against the mountain tribes, but fell in battle shortly before Alexander's death. Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) Bibliography Berve 2, no. 200 Heckel 260. [German version] [2] Commander of the Greek allied infantry from 334/33 BC Son of …

Aristus

(28 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] From Salamis, Late Hellenistic  Alexander historian, invented a Roman delegation to which  Alexander [4] prophesied Rome's future greatness (FGrH 143). Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)

Erigyius

(116 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] (Ἐρίγυιος; Erígyios). From Mytilene, resident of Amphipolis together with his brother  Laomedon, older than Alexander [4] and was banished in 337/6 BC together with others of his friends from younger days. As the only one of this group he was quickly given a command over troops, led the Greek cavalry near  Issus and  Gaugamela, and later appears as a trusted adviser of the king. He also took on special military tasks, thus e.g. against  Satibarzanes, whom he killed in single combat…

Amicitia

(392 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] Amicitia and amicus include also in the Latin personal, philosophical and social-political aspects of friendship. The use of amicitia as an expression of social and political relationships between individuals or states and their introduction under Greek influence ( philia,  Friendship) occurred in philosophy through Cicero, which also allows familiaris to become an unforced designation for a ‘friend’. Amicus and amicitia express within Rome the relationship between high-ranking people of the same rank as well as the connection between the…
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