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Dedication of Churches

(818 words)

Author(s): Heinz, Andreas | Ivanov, Vladimir | Gräb, Wilhelm
[German Version] I. Concept and Origins – II. Catholic Church – III. Orthodox Churches – IV. Protestant Church I. Concept and Origins Church dedication is the ceremony which commits a church building to its liturgical use ( dedicatio). It is first attested in Tyre (Eus. Hist. eccl. X 3f.); the translation of the relics of martyrs for the first celebration of the eucharist appears as early as the 4th century (Ambr.

Sign of the Cross

(204 words)

Author(s): Heinz, Andreas

Silence

(996 words)

Author(s): Neu, Rainer | Kreuzer, Johann | Heinz, Andreas
[German Version] I. Religious Studies Silence is a universal form of rel…

Pilgrimage/Places of Pilgrimage

(9,650 words)

Author(s): Winter, Fritz | Raspe, Lucia | Jehle, Irmengard | Hartinger, Walter | Schmid, Josef Johannes | Et al.
[German Version] I. Religious Studies A pilgrimage is a journey by an individual or group, religiously motivated, usually over a substantial distance and (esp. in earlier periods) demanding great effort. A Western pilgrim today can hardly imagine the dangers to which a peregrinus was exposed. This Latin term, the etymon of the English word pilgrim, denoted a foreigner or in some cases an exile. A person who undertook a pilgrimage was thus someone who had to leave his or her familiar environment. The element of foreignness and movement also induced – at least occasionally – escape from the normal social order, so that pilgrims who joined up with other itinerants were often treated ambivalently by officia…

Votive Mass

(397 words)

Author(s): Heinz, Andreas
[German Version] Votive Mass, from Latin votum (“vow, concern, wish”), a designation attested since the 7th century for a mass (II, 3) celebrated in response to a particular concern or event (sickness, a turning point in life, danger, death, burial) or in public emergencies (natural catastrophes, war). Numerous formularies were already included in the Sacramentum Gelasianum vetus (60) and the supplement to the