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Watson, Richard

(111 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Feb 22, 1781, Barton-upon-Humber, Lincolnshire – Jan 8, 1833, London), Wesleyan Methodist theologian (Methodists: I). Watson was a member of a small group of clergy and laity that contributed to the formation of Wesleyan Methodist identity, following the death of J. Wesley and its separation from the Church of England. Appointed to a succession of influential positions in the Church, he also published widely, clarifying and extending Wesley’s theology. Grayson Carter Bibliography Works include: Theological Institutes, 6 vols., 1823–1829 On Watson: T. Jackson, M…

Thornton, Henry

(131 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Mar 10, 1760, London – Jan 16, 1815, Kensington Gore), philanthropist, banker, member of parliament, and abolitionist (Abolitionism). Younger son of the wealthy evangelical merchant John Thornton, he worked in banking before being elected member of parliament in 1782. His writings on economic affairs were much admired. In Parliament he was active in humanitarian affairs and, as a member of the celebrated Clapham Sect, joined with W. Wilberforce in advancing the abolitionist cause…

Thompson, Francis

(157 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Dec 18, 1859, Preston, Lancashire – Nov 13, 1907, London), English Roman Catholic poet. In 1885, having failed to become a priest or doctor, and having succumbed to opium addiction, he relocated from his native Lancashire to London. Here, while living in filth, despair and penury, he came to know Wilfred Meynell, critic and editor of the Catholic magazine Merry England. Meynell befriended Thompson and was the first to recognize his poetic genius, which arose from a combination of his destitution and Christian faith. Before his premature d…

Chapel of Ease

(277 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson | Tiling, Peter v.
[German Version] I. History – II. Legal Status of Daughter Parishes I. History In the Western church, from the 12th century on separate chapels were established for preaching and administration of the sacraments. They were meant for those who lived in villages far from the parish church or those who could not (afford to) rent a pew. They were also an effective means of extending the church's outreach where it was difficult (or impossible) to establish new parishes. Often found in …

Jacobitism

(208 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson R.
[German Version] Defined broadly, Jacobitism is a tradition or movement in Great Britain, whose adherents after 1688 supported the hereditary claims of the Roman Catholic Stuart dynasty over the parliamentary title of the Protestant William of Orange (and his Hanoverian successors). Apart from its military and diplomatic dimensions, exemplified in the invasion attempt of 1715 and 1745, Jacobitism also had important intellectual, social, literary, philosophical, nationalistic, and theological dimensions. Not all Jacobites were Roman Cath-¶ olic: many High Church (High C…

Rowntree, John William

(158 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Sep 4, 1868, York – Mar 9, 1905, New York). Born into a prominent Quaker family, he left Bootham School, York, in 1886 to enter the family cocoa business. In 1892 he married Constance Naish (1871–1928) of Bristol, with whom he had five children. Beginning in 1893, Rowntree provided inspired and energetic leadership to the Quaker cause, especially through his promotion of adult schools as a means of securing an education for lay ministry. He also published widely, including Present Day Papers (1898–1899), A History of the Adult School Movement (1903), and Palestine Notes

Toplady, Augustus Montague

(103 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Nov 4, 1740, Farnham, Surrey – Aug 12, 1778, London), Anglican priest and hymn-writer. Though occupying a number of pulpits in the Church of England, Toplady remained mostly in London where he preached and, as a staunch Calvinist, engaged in spirited controversy with the Arminian J. Wesley, among others. He is chiefly remembered as the author of the hymn “Rock of Ages” (c. 1775). Grayson Carter Bibliography Works, ed. W. Row, 1794 On Toplady: T. Wright, The Life of Augustus M. Toplady, 1911 G. Lawton, Within the Rock of Ages, 1983 A. Pollard, Oxford DNB LV, 2004, 37–39.

More, Hannah

(155 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Feb 2, 1745, Stapleton, Avon, near Bristol – Sep 7, 1833, Clifton), evangelical writer and philanthropist. More was educated at a school in Bristol established by one of her sisters. Around 1773 she came into contact with the literary circle that gathered around S. Johnson, who urged her to publish her poems and plays. She later became identified with the evangelical Clapham Sect, with J. Newton serving as her principal spiritual adviser. Besides her numerous publications she est…

Dissolution of the Monasteries Act

(275 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] As the result of moral, economic, political and religious factors, Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries in England and Wales in the 1530s. Assisted by T. Cromwell, the process continued intermittently. In 1536, Parliament passed an act – the co-called “Dissolution of the Monasteries Act” – that led to the closure of around 250 of the smaller houses of the orders (roughly a third of the …

Nonjurors

(549 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] The revolution of 1688, though peaceful, brought about important constitutional reform in England (III, 1.b): no longer did the Crown rule by divine hereditary right, but by the will of Parliament. The Nonjurors, or those members of the Church of England who refused to subscribe to the oaths of allegiance on the grounds that they violated their previous oaths to James II and his successors, opposed this. They included the archbishop of Canterbury (W. Sancroft); the bishops of Ches…

Sharp, Granville

(110 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Nov 10, 1735, Durham, England – Jul 6, 1813, Fulham, a borough of London), evangelical and abolitionist (Slavery). In 1765 he became involved in opposing the slave trade, advancing numerous legal ¶ cases on behalf of slaves held in England. His efforts culminated in the famous “Fall Somerset” case of 1772 which outlawed the forcible removal of slaves from the country. Sharp also developed an interest in African culture and assisted in the relocation of a number of freed slaves to Sierra Leone. Grayson Carter Bibliography Memoirs of Granville Sharp, ed. T. Burgess, 1820 E.…

Oman, John Wood

(186 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] ( Jul 23, 1860, Orkney, Scotland – May17, 1939, Cambridge, England), Presbyterian theologian. Oman studied in Edinburgh and Heidelberg, and served churches in Scotland and England prior to becoming professor (1907), and principal (1922) of Westminster College, Cambridge. Alarmed at the crisis then confronting Christianity, Oman developed an interest in F.D.E. Schleiermacher, and his model of the inner authority of truth; Oman translated ¶ Schleiermacher’s Über die Religion (1799 text, ET: On Religion: Speeches to its Cultured Despisers, 1988; 1831 text, ET: Sp…

Temple, William

(162 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Oct 15, 1881, Exeter – Oct 26, 1944, Westgate-on-Sea). After leaving Oxford, Temple rose quickly through a succession of senior appointments in the Church of England, including bishop of ¶ Manchester (1921) and archbishop of York (1929), before being elevated to Canterbury (1942). His contributions to the various debates over social, international, and economic issues were especially respected. Active in the early ecumenical movement, he helped to advance both the Faith and Order and the Life and Work Movemen…

Sherlock, Thomas

(156 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (1678, London – Jul 18, 1761, London), Anglican bishop. Sherlock served as Fellow and Master of St. Catherine’s College, Cambridge, and (in succession to his father) as Master of the Temple in London where he gained a wide reputation for his preaching. A Tory representative of the High Church movement, he led the opposition to bishop Benjamin Hoadly during the famous Bangorian Controversy (1717) and fell out of favor at Court. After the death of George I his fortunes changed and h…

Tait, Archibald Campbell

(167 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Dec 21, 1811, Edinburgh – Dec 3, 1882, Episcopal Place at Addington), archbishop of Canterbury. Educated at Edinburgh and Oxford, Tait converted to the Church of England in 1830. Three years later, he was appointed tutor at Balliol College, Oxford. Though sympathetic to the aims of the Oxford Movement, in 1841 he joined in the public protest against Tract 90 (J.H. Newman). Talented and widely admired, Tait quickly advanced through a succession of clerical appointments, including headmaster of Rugby (1842, succeeding T. Arnold); bishop of…

Neale, John Mason

(178 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Jan 24, 1818, London – Aug 6, 1866, East Grinstead, West Sussex), Anglican author and hymn writer. Having been influenced by the Catholic revival (High Church movement [I]), at Cambridge he helped found the Camden Society. Though ordained in 1841, ill-health prevented his installation into a parish. From 1846 on he served as warden of Sackville College, Sussex. Here, he divided his time between writing and the Sisterhood of St. Margaret, which (in 1855) he founded to educate girl…

Underhill, Evelyn

(160 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Dec 6, 1875, Wolverhampton – Jun 15, 1941, London), author of spiritual works. Educated at King’s College, London, in 1907 she experienced a religious conversion of a mystical nature. Her early spiritual views were described in her first book, Mysticism (1911, Mysticism). Before long she met Friedrich v. Hügel, who would later become her spiritual director. Under his influence, her interest in historical Christianity developed so that she abandoned her mystical, intellectual, Neo-Platonist views in favor of a more pra…

Seabury, Samuel

(110 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Nov 30, 1729, Groton, CT – Feb 25, 1796, New London, CT). After ordination in the Church of England (1753), Seabury served as a missionary in several American parishes. During the American Revolution (North America: I, 2), he remained a Loyalist. Nominated the first bishop in the Protestant Episcopal Church, he was consecrated in Aberdeen in 1784 by bishops of the Scottish Episcopal Church. He then became rector of St. James’ parish church, New London, bishop of Connecticut, and (1790) bishop of Rhode Island. Grayson Carter Bibliography E.E. Beardsley, Life and Corre…

Taylor, Jeremy

(269 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Aug, 15, 1613, Cambridge, UK – Aug 13, 1667, Lisburn, Ireland). The son of a local barber, Taylor studied at Caius College, Cambridge, before becoming a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford (1636). He was then appointed chaplain to archbishop W. Laud and, somewhat later, to Charles I; in 1638 he became rector of Uppingham, Rutland. He was awarded a doctorate for his work, The Sacred Order and Offices of Episcopacy (1642). While serving as royal chaplain during the Civil War, he was captured and imprisoned. After his release, he lived quietly in secl…

Laud, William

(275 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Oct 7, 1573, Reading, England – Jan 10, 1645, London), archbishop of Canterbury. Educated at St. John's College, Oxford, he opposed, early in life, the prevailing Calvinistic theology. Of considerable talent and learning, he was appointed to a rapid succession of ecclesiastical appointments, including dean of Gloucester (1616), bishop of St. David's (1621), Bath and Wells (1626), and London (1628), and finally archbishop of Canterbury (1633). His various attempts to impose liturg…
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