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K̲h̲amsa

(1,175 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
is in the technical language of Persian and Turkish literature a set of five mat̲h̲nawī poems. The term is used, first of all, to designate the five epic poems of Niẓāmī [ q.v.] of Gand̲j̲a which were composed between ca. 570/1174-5 and 600/1203-4. The set contains one didactic poem Mak̲h̲zan al-asrār , in the metre sarīʿ-i maṭwiyy-i mawḳūf ; three romantic poems: Laylā u Mad̲j̲nūn in the metre hazad̲j̲-i musaddas-i maḳbūḍ-i maḥd̲h̲ūf , K̲h̲usraw u S̲h̲īrīn in the metre hazad̲j̲-i musaddas-i maḥd̲h̲ūf , and Haft Paykar in the metre k̲h̲afīf-i mak̲h̲būn-i maḳsūr ; and the Iskandarnāma

K̲h̲argird

(860 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, or K̲h̲ard̲j̲ird, has been the name of at least two different places in northeastern Persia but is at present only current for one of them. 1. K̲h̲argird in the s̲h̲ahristān of Turbat-i Ḥaydariyya, or, more precisely, the dihistān of Rūd-i miyān K̲h̲wāf, is situated at about 6 km. to the southwest of the latter place. It is now a small settlement, the inhabitants of which live on the growing of cereals and cotton as well as on weaving. Archaeological remains point, however, to a much more prosperous past when K̲h̲argird was one of the main urban centres of the district of K̲h̲wāf [ q.v.]. Many m…

Nūr al-Ḥaḳḳ al-Dihlawī

(269 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, or Nūr al-Dīn Muḥammad al-S̲h̲āhd̲j̲ahānābādī, a traditionist and historiographer of Mug̲h̲al India who flourished in the 11th/17th century. The nickname “al Turk al-Buk̲h̲ārī” points to his origin from Central Asia. As a poet he adopted the pen name “Mas̲h̲riḳī”. He was the son of the scholar ʿAbd al-Ḥaḳḳ [ q.v.] al-Dihlawī, a well-known s̲h̲ayk̲h̲ of the Ḳādiriyya order. Nūr al-Ḥaḳḳ succeeded his father as a religious teacher and was appointed a judge at Agra under S̲h̲āh D̲j̲ahān. His death at Dihlī occurred in 1073/1662. In Zubdat al-tawārīk̲h̲ , Nūr al-Ḥaḳḳ enlarged the Tārīk̲h̲-…

Nāma

(445 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
(p.). a Persian word, derived as an adjective from the common Iranian root nāman- , “name”. Already in Middle Persian the form nāmag can be ¶ found also as a substantive referring to an inscription, a letter or a book. In the orthography of Pahlavī, the word could be written either phonemically, as n’mk’, or by means of any of two heterographs: S̲H̲M-k’, which was based on the Semitic word for “name”, and MGLT’, i.e. the Aramaic m e gill e ta , “scroll” (cf. L. Koehler and W. Baumgartner, Lexicon in Veteris Testamenti libros , Leiden 1953, 1091). It occurs also in co…

Maḥmūd B. ʿAbd al-Karīm b. Yaḥyā S̲h̲abistarī

(1,188 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, (or S̲h̲abustarī , according to modern Azeri writers) S̲h̲ayk̲h̲ Saʿd al-Dīn, Persian mystic and writer. He was born at S̲h̲abistar, a small town near the north-eastern shore of Lake Urmiya. The date of his birth is unknown, but would have to be fixed about 686/1287-8 if the report that he died at the age of 33 (mentioned in an inscription on a tombstone erected on his grave in the 19th century) is accepted. He is said to have led the life of a prominent religious scholar at Tabrīz. Travels to Egypt, Syria and the Ḥid̲j̲āz are mentioned in the introduction to the Saʿādat-nāma

S̲h̲ahriyār

(547 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, Sayyid (or Mīr) Muḥammad Ḥusayn , a modern Persian poet. He was born about 1905 at Tabrīz as the son of a lawyer, and belonging to a family of sayyid s in the village of K̲h̲us̲h̲gnāb. In his early work he used the pen name Bahd̲j̲at, which he later changed to S̲h̲ahriyār, a name chosen from the Dīwān of Ḥāfiẓ, who was his great model as a writer of g̲h̲azal s. …

Kās̲h̲if

(302 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, muḥammad s̲h̲arīf b. s̲h̲ams al-dīn al-s̲h̲īrāzī ( ca. 1001/1592-after 1063/1653), a Persian prosewriter and poet with the tak̲h̲alluṣ Kās̲h̲if (the forms Kās̲h̲if-i Kumayt, cf. Rosen, loc. cit., and S̲h̲arīfā Kās̲h̲if, cf. Tad̲h̲kira-i Naṣrābādī in the synopsis by A. Sprenger, Cat. Oudh , 91, are also mentioned). He lived in Iṣfahān and later in Ray, where he was a ḳāḍī for 15 years. His brothers Ismāʿīl Munṣif and Muḳīma were also known as poets. Only two works by Kās̲h̲if seem to have survived. Both deal wit…

Sabk-i, Hindī

(1,736 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
(p.), the Indian style, is the third term of a classification of Persian literature into three stylistic periods. The other terms, sabk-i Ḵh̲urāsānī (initially also called sabk-i Turkistānī ) and sabk-i ʿIrāḳī , refer respectively to the eastern and the western parts of mediaeval Persia. The assumption underlying this geographical terminology is that the shifts of the centre of literary activity from one area to another, which took place repeatedly since the 4th/10th century, were paralleled by a stylisti…

Mahsatī

(500 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
(the most probable interpretation of the consonants mhsty , for which other forms, like Mahistī, Mahsitī or Mihistī, have been proposed as well; cf. Meier, 43 ff.) a Persian female poet whose historical personality is difficult to ascertain. She must have lived at some time between the early 5th/11th and the middle of the 6th/12th century. The earl…

Muḥtas̲h̲am-i Kās̲h̲ānī

(875 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, S̲h̲ams al-S̲h̲uʿarāʾ Kamāl al-Dīn , Persian poet of the early Ṣafawid period, born ca. 1500 in Kās̲h̲ān. According to the most reliable sources, he died in 996/1587-8; a ¶ less likely dating of his death, given by Abū Ṭālib Iṣfahānī in K̲h̲ulāṣat al-afkār (see Storey i/2, 878), is 1000/1591-2. For some time he was a draper ( bazzāz ) like his father, but he abandoned this trade for the more profitable career of a professional poet. His work was appreciated at the Ṣafawid court at Ḳazwīn. He seems to have continued, however, to l…

ʿUbayd-I Zākānī

(909 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. De
, or Niẓām al-Dīn ʿUbayd Allāh al-Zākānī, Persian poet of the Mongol period who became especially famous for his satires and parodies. He was born into a family of scholars and state officials descending from Arabs of the Banū Ḵh̲afād̲j̲a [ q.v.] settled in the area of Ḳazwīn since early Islamic times. In 730/1329-30 the historian Ḥamd Allāh Mustawfī described him as a talented poet and a writer of learned treatises. A collection of Arabic sayings by prophets and wise men, entitled Nawādir al-amt̲h̲āl , belongs to this early period. When later in the same decade the central government of the Īl-Ḵh̲āns collapsed, ʿUbayd found a refug…

Malik al-S̲h̲uʿarāʾ

(980 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
(a.), “King of the Poets”, honorific title of a Persian poet laureate, which is also known in other forms. It was the highest distinction which could be given to a poet by a royal patron. Like other honorifics [see laḳab ], it confirmed the status of its holder within his profession and was regarded as a permanent addition to his name which sometimes even became a hereditary title. Corresponding to this on a lower level was the privilege, given occasionally to court poets, of choosing a pen name [see tak̲h̲alluṣ ] based on the name or one of the laḳab s of their patron. Certain responsibilities we…

Kās̲h̲īf

(308 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, Muḥammad S̲h̲arīf b. S̲h̲ams al-dīn al-S̲h̲īrāzī (vers 1001 - après 1063/1592-1653), prosateur et poète persan qui utilisa le tak̲h̲alluṣ de Kās̲h̲if (on trouve également les formes de Kās̲h̲if-i Kumayt [cf. Rosen, Manuscrits persans, 285], et S̲h̲arīfā Kās̲h̲if [cf. Tad̲h̲kira-i Naṣrābādī dans le synopsis de A. Sprenger, Catal. Oud̲h̲., 91]); il vécut à Iṣfahān et plus tard à Rayy où il exerça les fonctions de ḳāḍī pendant 15 ans. Ses frères Ismāʿīl Munṣif et Muḳīma sont également connus comme poètes. De l’œuvre de Kās̲h̲if, il ne subsiste apparemment que …

Muḥtas̲h̲am-i Kās̲h̲ānī

(877 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, S̲h̲ams al-S̲h̲uʿarāʾ Kamāl al-dīn, poète persan des débuts de la période ṣafawide qui naquit vers 905/1500 à Kās̲h̲ān et, d’après les sources les plus sûres, mourut en 996/1587-8 (en 1000/1591-2, selon Abū Ṭālib al-Iṣfahānī [voir Storey, 1/2, 878], ce qui est moins vraisemblable). Il fut pendant quelque temps marchand de tissus ( bazzāz), comme son père, mais il abandonna ce métier pour embrasser la carrière plus avantageuse de poète professionnel. Son œuvre était appréciée à la cour ṣafawide à Ḳazwīn, mais il semble avoir continué à résider à …

K̲h̲amsa

(1,109 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, terme technique des littératures persane et turque désignant un ensemble de cinq mat̲h̲nawīs [ q.v.]; il s’applique en premier lieu aux cinq poèmes épiques de Niẓāmī [ q.v.] de Gand̲j̲a composés entre 570/1174-5 environ et 600/1203-4. Cet ensemble contient un poème didactique, le Mak̲h̲zan al-asrār sur le mètre sarīʿ-i maṭwī-yi mawḳūf, trois pièces romantiques: Laylā u Mad̲j̲nūn en hazad̲j̲-i musaddas-i maḳbūḍ-i maḥd̲h̲ūf, Ḵh̲usraw u S̲h̲īrīn en ¶ hazad̲j̲-i musaddas-i mahd̲h̲ūf et Haft Paykar en I k̲h̲afīf-i mak̲h̲būn-i maḳṣūr, et enfin l’ Iskandar-nāma en mutaḳārib-i …

Rind

(803 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
(p.), désigne avec une nuance de mépris un coquin, un filou, un ivrogne, un débauché. Dans la terminologie des poètes et des mystiques, il acquiert la signification plus positive de personne dont le comportement extérieur est blâmable, mais dont le cœur est sain (Steingass, s.v. d’après le Burhān-i ḳāṭiʿ). L’étymologie de rind est obscure. Ce n’est pas un emprunt à l’arabe, malgré l’existence d’un pluriel interne runūd, forme savante employée à côté du pluriel régulier persan rindān. Le nom abstrait rindī désigne la conduite spécifique d’une personne ainsi qualifiée. Les historiens …

S̲h̲emʿī

(753 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
pseudonyme ( tak̲h̲alluṣ) d’un traducteur et commentateur turc d’ouvrages en persan de la seconde moitié du Xe/XVIe siècle. Dans ses propres ouvrages comme dans la…

ʿUnṣurī

(1,360 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, Abū l-Ḳasim Ḥasan b. Aḥmad, poète persan de la cour g̲h̲āznavide, au début du Ve/XIe siècle. Les renseignements extérieurs sur sa vie sont avant tout anecdotiques. On dit qu’il naquit à Balk̲h̲. et qu’il fut orphelin dès son jeune âge; il gagnait sa vie en tant que marchand dans sa jeunesse. L’histoire, rapportée par certaines sources, selon laquelle il aurait été associé à une histoire de vol, lors de l’un de ses voyages, lui a été attribuée à tort (cf. Storey-de Blois, V/1, 234-5). Il débuta sa carrière de p…

Nūr al-Ḥaḳḳ al-Dihlawī

(267 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
, ou Nūr al-dīn Muḥammad al-S̲h̲āhd̲j̲ahānābādī, traditionniste et historiographe de l’Inde mug̲h̲ale, qui vivait au XIe/XVIIe siècle. Son surnom d’al-Turk al-Buk̲h̲ārī est une allusion au fait qu’il était originaire de l’Asie Centrale. Comme poète, il avait pour pseudonyme Mas̲h̲riḳī. Il était le fils de ʿAbd al-Ḥaḳḳ [ q.v.] al-Dihlawī, un s̲h̲ayk̲h̲ b…

Nāma

(425 words)

Author(s): Bruijn, J.T.P. de
(p.), terme dérivé d’un adjectif provenant de la racine iranienne commune nāman- «nom». Dès le moyen persan, on rencontre aussi la forme nāmag comme substantif désignant une inscription, une lettre ou un livre. Dans la graphie du pehlevi, le mot pouvait être écrit soit phonémiquement, nʾmkʾ, ou au moyen de l’un de ces deux hétérographes: S̲H̲M-k’, fondé sur le mot sémitique désignant le «nom», ou MGLTʾ, c’est-à-dire l’araméen megilleta «rouleau» (cf. Koehler et W. Baumgartner, Lexicon in Veteris Testamentis libros, Leyde 1953, 1091). Il figure aussi dans des composés, en ¶ particulie…
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