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Lelante

(51 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Ληλάντη; Lēlántē). Wife of the mythological Molossian king Munichus and mother of Alcander among others. When the god-fearing family is attacked by robbers and their house is set alight, they are transformed into birds by Zeus so they can be saved (Antoninus Liberalis 14). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Nicaea

(1,521 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle) | Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) | Dreyer, Boris (Göttingen) | Daverio Rocchi, Giovanna (Milan) | Strobel, Karl (Klagenfurt) | Et al.
(Νίκαια; Níkaia). [German version] [1] Naiad Naiad, daughter of the Phrygian river god Sangarius and the goddess Cybele. As a huntress, N. spurns love and remains a virgin. In Memnon of Heracleia, she does not yield to Dionysus and so he resorts to a ruse and turns into wine the spring from which N. is accustomed to drinking. She becomes drunk and falls asleep. Dionysus overpowers her in her sleep and fathers with her 'satyrs and others' (Memnon FGrH 434 F 41, 8f.). In Nonnus, Dion. 15,169-16,405, the…

Marmax

(45 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Μάρμαξ; Mármax). Suitor of Hippodamia [1], and the first to be killed by Oenomaus (Hes. fr. 259a). His horses Parthenia and Eripha are buried together with M. M. was also called Mermnes (schol. Pind. O. 1,127b) or Mermnon. Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Lamache

(41 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λαμάχη; Lamáchē). Lemnian woman who conceives Leucophanes with the Argonaut Euphemus. From Leucophanes is descended Battus [1], who founds the city of Cyrene (schol. Pind. Pyth. 455b; [1]). Frey, Alexandra (Basle) Bibliography 1 L. Malten, Kyrene, 1911, 192.

Oeagrus

(86 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Οἴαγρος/ Oíagros). Father of the singer Orpheus (Pind. fr. 128c,11f.; Pl. Symp. 179d; Diod. Sic. 3,65,6; 4,25,2 etc.). The Muse Calliope [1] is usually said to be the mother of Orpheus (Apollod. 1,14; Apoll. Rhod. 1,23ff. with schol.); variants are Polyhymnia (schol. Apoll. Rhod. l.c.) and Cleio. O's homeland was Thracia, where Orpheus has also been localized. The parents of O. were Methone and Pierus (Charax FHG 3 fr. 20) or Charops [2], to whom Dionysus gave Thracia (Diod. 3,65). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Loxias

(117 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λοξίας; Loxías). Epiclesis of the god Apollo (Pind. Pyth. 3,28; Pind. Isthm. 7,49; Hdt. 1,91; 4,163; Aesch. Sept. 618; Soph. OT 853). It is striking that the combination Apollo L. does not occur; the reference to Apollo as a Delphian oracle god, however, is clear (cf. l.c.). If the name L. is derived from loxós ‘bent’, ‘crooked’, then it refers to Apollo's dark and confusing oracles (Lucian. Iupp. trag. 28; Plut. Mor. 511b). According to the schol. to Callimachus, Apollo is named L. because he is said to have been brought up by Lox…

Pelanos

(150 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (πελανός; pelanós), a more or less liquid gruel or dough, which could also contain honey, oil, poppies, milk or wine, was thrown in the fire as a sacrificial offering and burnt or poured out (cf. Aesch. Pers. 203f.; Eur. Ion 226f.; 705-707). According to Theophrastus (in Porph. De abstinentia 2,29) pelanos assumed increasingly refined forms in the course of its historical development. The dough was finally mixed and baked into flat bread, cakes or pancakes. P elanos itself, however, was never eaten. It was particularly common as a sacrificial offering  in…

Lacinius

(129 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λακίνιος, Λακῖνος; Lakínios, Lakînos). Iapygian king who ruled over the land of the Bruttii; eponym of the Lacinium Mountains near Croton. L. took in Croton, who had been banished from Corcyra, and gave him his daughter Laure (or Laurete) in marriage (schol. Lycoph. 1007; schol. Theoc. 4,33b). When Heracles [1] returned from his Geryon adventure, he came into conflict with L. Concerning the cause of this, there are two variant accounts: either L. refused hospitality to Heracles, c…

Cyanippus

(181 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
(Κυάνιππος, ‘Black horse’). [German version] [1] King of Argus King of Argus, son of Aegialeus and of Comaetho, descendant of Bias (Paus. 2,18,4; 30,10). According to Apollodor (1,103), C. is the son of  Adrastus [1] and brother of  Aegialeus [1]. Pausanias confuses his family tree: he speaks about four generations and five rulers but does not include C. among these, as the rulers cannot be called Nēleídai until Talaus (whose mother is a daughter of Neleus). Pausanias includes Diomedes as C.'s guardian as he assumes rule for C. who was a minor [1]. Frey, Alexandra (Basle) [German version] [2…

Celeutor

(76 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Κελεύτωρ; Keleútōr). C. and his brothers snatch the rulership from their uncle  Oeneus, king of Aetolia, and lock him up; they make their father  Agrius [1] king, until Diomedes frees his grandfather Oeneus and kills all of Agrius' sons except for two who are able to flee. Since Oeneus is too old, Diomedes hands over the rulership to Oeneus' son-in-law  Andraemon [1] (Apollod. 1,77f.; Paus. 2,25,2; Hyg. Fab. 175). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Ceteii

(56 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Κήτειοι; Kḗteioi). Warriors of  Eurypylus [2] (Hom. Od. 11,521; Str. 13,1,69f.), whose origin is in Mysian Theutrania in western Asia Minor (schol. Hom. loc. cit.). The name C. is interpreted variously: either as ‘the Great ones’ or as derived from the river Ceteius (Hsch. s.v. K.; Str. loc. cit.). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
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