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Epistulis, ab

(494 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] Correspondence constituted one of the central tasks of the administration; this had to be undertaken within the bounds of the responsibility of a particular authority in an impersonal businesslike manner and in accordance with generally applicable instructions ( officii formae). The term epistula ( Epistle), adopted into Latin administrative terminology from the original Greek, officially referred to a written communication by an authority, delivered to a real addressee. An epistula could result from a previous enquiry, petition, or application by…

Admissio

(144 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] Ceremonial admittance to an audience with the emperor. The responsible office ( admissionales, officium admissionum: Suet. Vesp. 14; Amm. Marc. 15,5,18) were subordinated in the late imperial era to the magister admissionum in the area of the magister officiorum (Cod. Theod. 11,18,1; Not. Dign. or. 11,17). Depending on the sometimes generous (Plin. Pan. 47,3), but usually strictly formal (SHA Alex. Sev. 20) practice of the emperor, visitors were divided into classes for the   salutatio depending on their differing degree of distance to the emperor. The imperial amic…

Immunitas

(332 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] The exemption of individual legal persons from the obligations to military service, public service and consent, Lat. immunitas (... vacationem militiae munerisque ... immunitatem appellari: Dig. 50,16,18; Greek atéleia, aneisphoría, aleitourgeisía: Dig. 27,1,6,2), can be based on legal, generally formulated non-inclusion of a circle to which they belong, or on a temporary or long-term personal dispensation (Dig. 50,6: de iure immunitatis; 50,5: de vacatione et excusatione munerum). Depending on the duties in question, the immunitas personae exempted from…

Interrex

(417 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] (literally ‘interim king’). The Roman official who had to conduct the election of a suffectus when someone holding the highest office became incapacitated. The word and the non-collegial nature of the office suggest that it has its origins in the period of kings (Liv. 1,17,12; Cic. Rep. 2,12,23; Plut. Numa 2). In the Republic the interrex intervened when the supreme office became vacant with the death of both consuls ( interregnum) and substitute elections had to be held that for consuls would normally be held by a consul who was still in office. Th…

Magister equitum

(385 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] The office of the magister equitum (ME) (‘Master of the Cavalry’) was an office assigned to the dictator , and was never an independent office. Like the original designation of the dictator as magister populi (Master of the Infantry) (Cic. Rep. 1,40,63; Varro Ling. 5,82), it contains the word magister (root mag- = ‘head, leader’) and an indication of the original function as cavalry leader ( equites ). The ME was appointed by the dictator as deputy (Liv. 8,32,1-8) for the period of his dictatorship. Appointment by a consul (Cass. Dio 42,21) or by …

Absentia

(469 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] Absence of persons or lack of facts with significant public or civil legal consequences: 1. Absence of a civis Romanus on the   census date, when personal presence is required (Vell. Pat. 2,7,7; exceptions: Gell. NA 5,19,16). Inexcused absentia can cause disadvantageous estimation of assets and class assignment (Cic. Att. 1,18,8), and can also bring sanctions as harsh as the forced sale of assets (Zon. 7,19). 2: The absentia of a candidate for public office during registration as a candidate and also during candidacy. Candidacy assumes personal re…

Domain

(479 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] The word domain (from the Lat. [ res] dominica through Late Latin domenica, Old French ‘domenie’, ‘domaine’) describes in the Middle Ages and in early modern times, rather more narrowly than the Late Latin original, the ‘feudal’ or ‘allodial real estate’ of a ‘landowner’ (‘noble’) and may denote the property as a whole or a single segment of it. In Roman legal language the res dominica is roughly covered by dominium (Dig. 50,16,195,2; 1,5,20), with the property being taken as plots or other things but possibly also applying to the whole property com…

Lictor

(479 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] The lictores (from ligare = to bind; Greek rhabdoûchos, rhabdophóros = carrier of the rods) were Roman bailiffs ( apparitores ) of the higher magistrates and of some priests (Liv. 1,8.; Lucr. 3,996; 5,1234). They signify the latter's power by carrying the fasces (bundles of rods with the executioner's axe). They are appointed for the term of office of the magistrate or permanently. Their number is determined by the rank of the official (consul 12, praetor 6, more in the Imperial period). Lictores are free-born or freedmen, slaves cannot hold the office (Liv. 2,…

Dediticii

(401 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] Members of a community that, having been vanquished in war by Rome, has surrendered unconditionally to the hegemony of the Roman people (  deditio ), and may by a decree of Rome have forfeited its existence as a state. Thus dediticii were all provincial inhabitants ( provinciales) whose community had been dissolved by Rome (Gai. Inst. 1,14): insofar as they had not already acquired Roman or Latin citizenship and been able to retain it, or were now granted it, or autonomous status had not been restored to their community. Diss…

Libellis, a

(186 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] The offices of the imperial court included an office primarily responsible for law-related complaints. This office dealt with judicial complaints addressed specially to the emperor as an instance of appeal, whereas working on imperial decisions on petitions as well as rescripts principally was a matter of other offices ( epistulis, ab ). Its purview also included suits which were decided at the imperial court as the primary instance, if the emperor assumed jurisdiction, such as proceedings of crimen laesae maiestatis ( lèse majesté) or maledictio Caesaris (‘slande…

Commendatio

(221 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] (1) Recommendation of a person or thing (Dig. 4,3,37), (2) entrusting something for safekeeping (Dig. 50,16,136) and (3) offering evidence for an assertion (Cod. Iust. 6,22,2). (4) In the context of an informal arrangement, i.e. one in principle not legally enforceable by either party, commendatio is an act by which a client entrusts his affairs to a patron to be represented or resolved, committing himself in honour to a debt of gratitude ( se alicui in clientelam, fidem commendare, Ter. Eun. 577; Petron. Sat. 140; Caes. B Gall. 4,27,7; Lex Visig. 5,3,8): a…

Patrimonium

(675 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] A. Concept In relation to the term familia (Family IV. B.), originally of a similar meaning. The meaning of patrimonium (etymologically reconstructed from patris munia, 'matters/affairs of the pater familias ') was restricted purely to matters of property, but in legal terminology, it was expanded to include all complex legal matters involving property that were of importance for transactions in private or public law, i.e. generally matters of 'real/physical property'. Gizewski, Christian (Berlin) [German version] B. Private law The concept of property in…

Consistorium

(259 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] can mean a place of assembly ( consistere means to discuss a topic: Cic. Fin. 4,72). From the time of Constantine [1] the Great it came to apply to the group of close collaborators of the emperor previously called the   consilium principis (as in sacrum consistorium, sometimes also auditorium, Greek θεῖον συνέδριον: Cod. Iust. 1, 14,8; [Aur. Vict.] Epit. Caes. 14). The consistorium serves for deliberations about political and administrative matters as well as, when the need arises, court procedures and the particularly solemn sanctioning of i…

Duoviri, Duumviri

(640 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] (‘[office filled by]’ two men; singular ‘ duum vir’, hence also ‘ duumviri’) denotes various kinds of office known to have been occupied by pairs of men. Many of these occur solely or for the most part at particular periods during the Roman Republic. Duumviri perduellionis were judges in matters of high treason in the early Republican period, and by the 1st cent. BC were hardly named any longer (Liv. 1,26,5f.; Cic. Rab. perd. 12f.). Duumviri sacris faciundis are the officials to whom the task of consulting the Sybilline Books was transferred in the 4th cen…

Domesticus

(374 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] In the general sense, a slave in a house ( domus), or a person bound to the family or to the head of the household (Dig. 48,19,11,1). However, the word having originally signified the opposite of publicius, during the Republic it already entered the political sphere, to designate the entire cohors of a Roman provincial governor: free and unfree servants ( servi, ministri), subordinate officials ( apparitores, officiales), even subordinates assigned by statute ( adiutores, comites, consiliarii) and the military escort. Although Cicero advised that there sh…

Arcarius

(177 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] Subaltern official (officialis) in the administration of an   arca , i.e. a public fund in the responsibility of a higher official (Cod. Theod. 11,28,6) or with a special purpose (see Dig. 50,4,1,2), but especially the imperial treasury (Cod. Just. 10,72,13). The duty of an arcarius (Dig. 40,5,41,17; Cod. Just. 10,72,15) was probably performed by a   scriba in Republican times. Both freemen and slaves were arcarii in the administration of towns, provinces, the imperial court, in colleges and corporations and in the military as administrators of the soldiers'   peculium…

Adiutor

(228 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] A. designates generally the ‘helper’ or ‘assistant’, but colloquially is rather pejorative, referring to the ‘accomplice’ (Dig. 47,2,51,3) or the subordinate, less important ‘assistant’ (Hor. Sat. 1,9,46; Phaedr. 5,5,14). In legal language, adiutor is the assistant of a functionary in civil legal tasks, e.g. as in the   tutela (Dig. 26,1,13,1), as well as in the sovereign area of magistrates, later for high officials in judicature, even for leading subordinate officials (Caes. B. Civ. 3,62,4; Tac., Ann. 3,12; Cod. lust. 1,18,5; 1,31,1). At the imperial court a procu…

Destinatio

(197 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] (from reconstr. de-stanare, ‘determine’) generally means the determination of a purpose or a decision, legally also a legally-binding unilateral declaration of will (Cod. Iust. 6,30,6; Dig. 50,17,76). In political life destinatio means the delegation of a subordinate or the installation in an office of a person envisaged for the task by a person authorized to do so. The imperial recommendation of a   candidatus to the Senate was also called destinatio as was the direct appointment of an office bearer by the emperor (Dig. 4,4,18,4; Cod. Iust. 11,74,2…

Aediles

(712 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] The original scope of duties of the aediles is still unexplained. Aediles points to aedes (temple) and thus to public buildings; the usual equation in Greek of   agoranomoi leads to an association with market duties (Just. Epit. 21,5,7). Roman tradition (Liv. 3,55,6 f.) places the first two aediles (plebeii) at the side of the tribuni plebis active since 494 BC, probably as assistants in administrative duties at the Temple of Ceres ( aedes Cereris Liberi Liberaeque), the cultic centre of the   plebs , and during market business at the nearby F…

Abrogatio

(306 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] In public law, abrogatio refers to the suspension of a right or law. 1a: the complete suspension of a law (  lex ) passed by   rogatio by the assembly (Ulp., prooem. 3: abrogatur legi, cum prorsus tollitur). 1b: in a broader sense also the obsoletion of a paragraph of law due to persistent non-observance (Dig. 1,3,32,1: receptum est, ut leges etiam tacito consensu omnium per desuetudinem abrogentur). 2a: the taking away of an   imperium transferred by the comitia via a rogatio. 2b: in a broader sense the denial of rights by a competent court (Cod. Theod. 9,10,3). The abrogatio i…

Centesima

(225 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] In one particular sense indicates  interest of one hundredth of the sum advanced per month, i.e. after Caesar's reform of the calendar 12 per cent per year. Towards the end of the Republic, this is the maximum rate allowed by law, applying in all cases where there is a justifiable obligation to pay interest, unless a lower rate is agreed (from 1 per cent = uncia to 11 per cent = deunx per centesima in each case; Cic. Ad Att. 5,21,11). It is not impossible that the lex XII tab. (8,18) in effect laid down the same maximum annual rate ( nam primo XII tabulis sanctum, ne quis unci…

Numerarius

(285 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] (Plural numerarii) had the general meaning of ‘arithmetician’ (Aug. De libero arbitrio 2,121; from numerare, ‘count, reckon, pay out’) but in the later Imperial period the special meaning ‘keeper of accounts’ in all civilian and military authorities (cf. Notitia dignitatum ) and the urban authorities of the civitates. The older word is tabularius (Dig. 11,6,7; Cod. Iust. 12,49,2 and 4). The rank and the - always subordinate - authority of a numerarius varies according to the area of employment (imperial headquarters, prefectural administration for ta…

Collega

(674 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] Collega generally means the individual who is working together with others to arrange something (from con and leg), including, for example, the member of an association or a corporate body (Dig. 27,1,42; 46,3,101 pr., 50,16,85). In politics, a collega is in particular an official associate in court, administration and government (Dig. 50,16,173 pr.: collegarum appellatione hi continentur, qui sunt eiusdem potestatis). The collegae in the republican offices of consul, praetor, censor, aedile, quaestor and tribune of the people are entitled an…

Nobilissimus

(174 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] The word nobilis (pl. nobiles ), in the Republican period and the Imperial period of the first two cents. AD, presumably denotes in particular the members of a senatorial family which included several consuls. From the 3rd cent. AD, with the increasing prevalence of court titles (Court titles C.,) it served to designate especially distinguished members of both the senatorial class and the imperial household (Dig. 1,2,2,43: members of the Senate; Cod. Iust. 6,23,19: members of the sacrum consistorium). From it was derived - probably from the reign of Constan…

Actarius

(168 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] ( actuarius.) Actarius can apply to   acta and also to actus (fast movement, transportation) and can therefore designate activities in various areas: 1. In private life, actarius (= actuarius) refers to the ‘fast scribe’, that is of court speeches or recitations (Suet. Iul. 55; Sen. Epist. 4,4,9; Tac. Ann. 5,4), and therefore also to the bookkeeper or accountant (Petron. Sat. 53,1). A. (= actarius) refers to a record-keeper in private and imperial households (CIL VI 5 182; VI 6 244; VI 9 106 f.). 2. In military life, actuarii are, since Septimius Severus, sometimes h…

Dominatus

(356 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] (Lat. dominatus) sometimes has the legal sense of dominium (cf. Nov. Theod. II. 22,2,16), meaning the position of a dominus as mandated authority, master or owner, esp. in family and property law (Dig. 12,6,64; 29,2,78). In the political realm, dominatus stands for ‘foreign’ or ‘arbitrary’ power (Greek tyrannís; Cic. Rep. 1,61). At the core of the concept is statutory power that is freely exercised and not susceptible of control, and thus is subject to abuse (Cic. Rep. 1,61). The modern German loan-word Dominat is a 19th-cent. neologism, and according to [1. 74…

Bruttiani

(130 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] Bruttiani were the ushers of Roman magistrates. Because of their desertion to Hannibal and their loyalty to him until the end of the Second Punic War, the southern Italian tribe of the  Bruttii not only had to surrender a large part of their territory to Rome, but also had to declare their readiness from then on to work as ushers in ‘slavish’ positions, albeit as free men. Although these punishments had lost their significance at the latest with the Social War, Bruttiani remained a synonym for   apparitores , because the Bruttii continued in their traditional service as   licto…

Censuales

(250 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] Assessment of citizens for tax purposes (  census ) in republican Rome is carried out by subordinate officials of free status ( scribae) and by bonded state servants ( servi publici a censu or censuales), under the political responsibility of the   censores insofar as they are in office. But supervision of the administration of the tax registers ( libri censuales) is carried out by a chief administrator, probably from early times called magister census. There are also census officials, occasionally termed censuales, in provincial administrations and in cities w…

Cubicularius

(281 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] (from cubiculum, literally ‘bedchamber’, also ‘private living space’, cf. Varro, Ling. 8,54) could denote a domestic slave, a personal servant, but also someone responsible for guarding access to a persona publica (Dig. 50,16,203). Officials from as early as the Republic had cubicularii in that sense (Cic. Verr. 2,3,8) and emperors from the very beginning had them as personal servants and confidants in their private domain (Suet. Iul. 4,1; Suet. Dom. 17,2). The higher ranks of the emperor's staff were occupied primarily …

Discessio

(138 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] General ‘dispersal’, in assemblies also ‘closure’ (Gell. NA 1,4,8; Ter. Andr. 5,68; Cic. Sest. 77). In legal terms, discessio describes the loss of a right or withdrawal from a contract (Dig. 18,2,17,18; Dig. 6,1,35 pr.). Politically, discessio was used as a general term for the formation of parties, splits and internal conflicts, such as between patricians and plebeians (Greek ἀπόστασις; apóstasis; Gell. NA 2,12; Sall. Hist. fr. 1,11). In the Roman Senate, discessio refers to the voting procedure in which voters go and assemble on different sides of …

Consul(es)

(841 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] The word consul is of uncertain etymology (possibly originating from con- and sal- = ‘hastily get together’ or from con- and sell-/ sedl- = ‘sit down together with’ or ‘sit down next to’). The historical tradition (Liv. 1,60,3-4), firmly established in the late Republican period, that following the expulsion of the last king Tarquinius Superbus in 510 BC there were two consules-colleagues at Rome's head is uncertain, because of some contrary indications in the same historical transmission. Initially, consules were probably assigned as advisers to a praetor maximus (…

Corrector

(273 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] The word corrector (from corrigere, ‘correct’) designates in general the critic who imposes censure or punishment, or the reorganizer, e.g. a pedagogue, overseer, official or politician with duties of this kind (Plin. Pan. 1,6,2; Sen. Dial. 4,10,7; Amm. Marc. 31,4,9). From the time of Trajan the name corrector was given to a senatorial legate of the emperor who was sent to a province with a special mission, e.g. ad ordinandum statum liberarum civitatum (Plin. Ep. 8,24). Arising from this already in the 3rd cent. AD is a form of regular provincial admi…

Curialis, Curiales

(198 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] [1] Local counsil Curialis (from curia) is the term used for both individual members of the local council and the council in its entirety as an institution ( decuriones; Dig. 29,2,25,1; 37,1,3,4; 50,16,239,5).  Curia;  Decuriones Gizewski, Christian (Berlin) [German version] [2] Member of the municipal Curial class Curalis was the name given to the members of the municipal Curial class, i.e. the members of families who on the basis of family descent ( curiali obstricti sanguine; Cod. Iust. 10,32,43), or, on the basis of the official duties of the heads o…

Concilium

(609 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] Concilium (from con-calare) is an assembly (Fest. p. 38) that has been called; also used in a transferred sense (Cic. Tusc. 1,72; Lucr. 3,805). 1. In political usage, concilium frequently differentiates a popular assembly without legal consequences from constitutional   contiones and   comitia ( is qui non universum populum, sed partem aliquam adesse iubet, non comitia, sed concilium edicere iubet, Gell. NA 15,27,4; Liv. 9,45,8). It was also used in the meaning of contio or comitia and then more often in association with populi and plebis (Cic. Sest. 65; lex Iulia muni…

Creatio

(725 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] (from creare: ‘to create’, ‘to generate’) has the meaning of ‘appointing’ or ‘calling’ in regard to private functions ( tutor: Dig. 26,7,39,6) as well as public offices (  magistratus : Dig. 48,14,1 pr.). It is used as a synonym but not as completely identical in meaning with nominatio and vocatio and at times is joined with lectio, electio (CIC. Verr. 2,2,49; Tac. Agr. 9; Dig. 1,11,1, pr.) or cooptatio (Liv. 2,33,2; 3,64,10). The term implies that an act of installation took place which contributes to the legitimacy. The general principle of creatio is valid for all po…

Curiosi

(202 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[German version] (from curiosus ‘prudent’, ‘eager to learn’) was the name given in late antiquity to civil servants of the imperial court of the up to 1,300 agentes in rebus (Cod. Iust. 12,20,3) who were given various special duties to perform locally for the central imperial government, as well as in the provinces or in foreign countries. As a special group, the curiosi are defined as agentes in rebus in curis agendis et evectionibus publici cursus inspiciendis (Cod. Iust. 12,22,2) who above all have to prevent improper use of government posts (Cod. Iust. 12,22,4) and …

Maiestas

(863 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] A. Definition Als Subst. zum Adj. maius (“zunehmend”, “größer”) bezeichnet m. allg. eine außergewöhnliche, fraglos überlegene und zu respektierende Macht und Würde, speziell 1. die Heiligkeit der Götter oder Gottes (Cic. div. 1,82; christl.: Cod. Iust. 1,1,1, pr.), 2. die patria potestas des pater familias gegenüber den ihm untergeordneten Verwandten und Sklaven (Liv. 4,45,8; Val. Max. 7,7,5; Cod. Iust. 6,20,12; s.u. B.) und bes. 3. die Hoheit des populus Romanus (Cic. Balb. 35; Cic. part. 105; Dig. 48,4,1,1), der res publica (Cic. de orat. 2,164) und ihrer …

Adventus

(196 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] “Ankunft” (einer Person), “Eintritt” (eines Ereignisses oder Falles) und speziell die polit. wichtige oder zeremonial hervorgehobene Ankunft etwa eines siegreichen Feldherrn, eines Amtsträgers oder Staatsgastes und insbes. des Kaisers in Rom und an anderem Ort (Verg. Aen. 6,798, Plin. pan. 22). Als a. in caelo gilt die Apotheose der Kaiser (Sen. apocol. 5; Claud. carm. 1,242). In der Triumphzeremonie hat der a. des Imperators am pomerium und am Kapitol-Tempel markante Bedeutung (Liv. 28,9,7; Cass. Dio 43,21, 2). Im rel. Bereich bezeichnet a. sowohl die Ersche…

Centesima

(199 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] bezeichnet in bes. Bedeutung u.a. einen Zins in Höhe eines Hundertstels von der Darlehenssumme im Monat, d.h. nach der caesarischen Kalenderreform von 12 % im Jahr. Gegen Ende der Republik ist dies der gesetzlich bestimmte Höchstsatz, der überall eintritt, wo Zinsverspflichtungen begründet sind, es sei denn ein niedrigerer Zins ist vereinbart (von 1 % = uncia bis 11 % = deunx jeweils der c.; Cic. Ad Att. 5,21,11). Es ist nicht ausgeschlossen, daß bereits die lex XII tab. (8,18) faktisch den gleichen Höchstzins im Jahr festlegte ( nam primo XII tabulis sanctum, n…

Censuales

(222 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] Die Steuerveranlagung ( census ) der Bürger wird im republikanischen Rom unter der polit. Verantwortlichkeit der censores , soweit im Amte, von freien Subalternbeamten ( scribae) und unfreien Staatsbediensteten ( servi publici a censu oder censuales) durchgeführt. Die Dienstaufsicht bei der Führung der Steuerlisten ( libri censuales) führt aber ein wohl schon früh magister census genannter Verwaltungschef. In der Verwaltung der Prov. und in den Städten mit eigener Verfassung gibt es ebenfalls census-Bedienstete, die gelegentlich als c. bezeichnet werden. Di…

Interrex

(383 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] (wörtl. “Zwischenkönig”). Der röm. Beamte, der bei Ausfall eines höchsten Amtsträgers die Wahl eines suffectus vorzunehmen hat. Das Wort und der nicht kollegiale Amtscharakter weisen auf eine Herkunft aus der Königszeit hin (Liv. 1,17,12; Cic. rep. 2,12,23; Plut. Numa 2). In der Republik tritt der i. ein, wenn durch den Tod beider Consuln das Oberamt vakant wird ( interregnum) und Ersatzwahlen stattfinden müssen, die im Normalfall für Consuln ein noch amtierender Consul abhält. Dies beruht vor allem auf der Annahme, daß nur Consuln die …

Contio

(303 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] C., von “ co-ventio” (allg. Bed.: öffentliche Versammlung) meint in einem speziellen Sinne eine nicht beschließende, sondern nur zu Informations- und Erörterungszwecken von einem Magistrat einberufene Versammlung röm. Bürger. Sie geht einer späteren, nur der Abstimmung, einer Wahl oder einem förmlichen comitialen Gerichtsverfahren dienenden Volksversammlung voraus. Das Verfahren ist formlos, richtet sich aber an dem späteren Beschlußverfahren aus. Einem comitialen Gerichtsverfahren müssen sogar jeweils drei c. vorausgehen. Von einem freien Red…

Abdicatio

(289 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] (“Absage”) bedeutet im allg. Sinne die Aufgabe einer Verpflichtung, Gewohnheit oder Überzeugung, aber auch die formal akzentuierte Absage, wie Aufkündigung der Freundschaft, Aufgabe eines Lasters oder die christl. Absage an die heidnischen Götter (Cic. orat. 2,102; Leo der Gr. Serm. 72,5). Spezielle Bed. erhält a. in der Rechtssprache: 1. Im Staatsrecht: Vorzeitige Niederlegung eines Amtes (auch renuntiatio); sie kann aus polit. Gründen insbes. bei Diktatoren und Konsuln freiwillig erfolgen (typ. Anlässe Krankheit: Cass. Dio 49,43,7 u…

Incensus

(148 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] (“nicht geschätzt”) ist derjenige, der in Rom seine Vermögensschätzung durch den Censor verabsäumt ( census : Dig. 1,2,2,17) und deshalb wegen Nichtfeststellung seiner Wählerklassenzugehörigkeit und seiner Kriegsdienstverpflichtung evtl. nicht zu seinen wesentlichen Bürgerpflichten herangezogen werden kann. Der i. wird nach einem legendären Gesetz des Servius Tullius (Liv. 1,44,1) mit dem Tode bestraft. In republikanischer Zeit kann die Konsequenz einer unterlassenen Steuererklärung Vermögenseinzug und Verkauf in di…

Cancellarius

(183 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] (von cancelli, “Schranke, Gitter”) meint allg. den Subalternbeamten bei Verwaltung und Gericht, der dem Publikum gegenübertritt, etwa bei der Einlaßkontrolle, erhält aber im Laufe der Kaiserzeit den speziellen Sinn ‘leitender Beamter eines Verwaltungsstabes’ (Lyd. mag. 3,37). In der Spätant. kann ein c. einem Kammerherrn für Audienzen gleichstehen (Not. dign. occ. 9,15) und sogar senatorischem Rang besitzen (Cassiod. var. 11,6; 10). Die c. beim praef. praet. Africae erhalten als den consiliarii nächststehende leitende Unterbeamte ein Gehalt von si…

Dictator

(380 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] (von dictare, “diktieren”, “zum Schreiben geben”, “anordnen”; andere Etym. bei Cic. rep. 1,63: quia dicitur). Inhaber einer notstandsbedingten, außerordentlichen, umfassenden, aber zeitlich begrenzten Amtsgewalt in der röm. Republik. Ein Imperiumsträger, also ein Consul und notfalls auch ein Praetor, kann aus eigener Kompetenz einen D. ernennen ( dictatorem dicere), und zwar formell ohne Interzessionsmöglichkeit eines Kollegen, aber in der Regel nach Absprache mit dem Senat und anderen Amtsträgern. Der D. wird damit zum Inhab…

Ducenarius

(209 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] ( duceni = “je zweihundert”) zeigt allg. einen Bezug zur Zahl 200 an, so z.B. beim Gewicht ( duceni pondo = zwei centenarii /Doppel-“Zentner”). Im polit. Bereich bezeichnet d. seit der Gerichtsreform Sullas (82 v.Chr.) die 200 dem Ritterstand angehörigen Richter in den Abteilungen ( decuriae ) der Geschworenengerichte (Vell. 2,32,3; Liv. per. 89; Suet. Aug. 32 betr. die augusteische Neuordnung). In der Prinzipatszeit leitet sich der Name d. von der Besoldung mit 200000 HSS für ritterliche Beamte im Dienste des Kaisers ab und bezeichnet in der Reg…

Dekretalen

(342 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] Ein Schriftstück, das ein decretum enthält, heißt im späteren Latein decretale (Sidon. epist. 7,9,6). Decretum (von decernere “entscheiden”) wird sowohl für Einzelfallenscheidungen als auch für generelle Regelungen gebraucht. Im Einzelfall ist es das gerichtliche Urteil oder der Bescheid eines Magistrats oder sonstiger Gerichtsinstanzen und Behörden (auch Kollegialentscheide), wodurch nach Prüfung des Sachverhalts ( causae cognitio) eine rechtliche Entscheidung getroffen wird (Dig. 37,1,3,8), im Unterschied zum rescriptum , d…

Domesticus

(327 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] Im allg. Sinn ein Sklave in einem Haus ( domus) oder eine der Familie bzw. dem Hausherrn verbundene Person (Dig. 48,19,11,1). Schon in republikanischer Zeit dringt jedoch das urspr. im Kontrast zu publicus stehende Wort in die polit. Sphäre ein, indem es die gesamte cohors eines röm. Provinzstatthalters bezeichnet: freie und unfreie Diener ( servi, ministri), Subalternbeamte ( apparitores, officiales), sogar gesetzlich beigeordnete Untergebene ( adiutores, comites, consiliarii) und den mil. Begleitschutz. Zwar rät Cicero zu einer Trennung zwisch…

Curiata lex

(332 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin)
[English version] Rechtskräftiger Beschluß der nach curiae gegliederten comitia curiata, des wohl ältesten Typs der röm. Volksversammlung. Die frühe Form ist aus den Quellen kaum zu erschließen (vgl. Cic. rep. 2,25). Vermutlich wurden urspr. alle Fragen der Geschlechterordnung, des Kultwesens, des Bürgerrechts, des Militäraufgebots ( legio), der Abgaben, der Inauguration von Königen und Priestern, und später der Zuständigkeiten der Ämter durch leges curiatae geregelt (Liv. 1,17,8f.; 1,22,1). Wahlen und Rechtsprechung sind dagegen erst den sich in der frühe…
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