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Gutturals

(254 words)

Author(s): Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg)
[German version] The Neo-Latin terminus technicus gutturals (‘guttural sounds’) for a class of consonants is traditional (nouns that before the endings have a g, k/c or χ are called guttural stems). Today research prefers the more appropriate term ‘Tectals’, as in the articulation of this consonant the back of the tongue is pressed against the roof of the mouth (Latin tectum) in order to obstruct the stream of air through constriction or blockage, so producing the sound typical of gutturals. To the proto-Indo-European are attributed nine or ten tectal ph…

Septimus

(88 words)

Author(s): Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg)
[German version] Must be a former Roman individual name (see below) which in the classical period no longer appears as a praenomen. Etymologically, it corresponds to the Latin ordinal septimus, 'the seventh' (cf. Quintus, Sextus). A synonymous name exists in Umbrian (old-Umbrian nom. Se(f)tums). The (neo)-Umbrian vocative evolved, with phonetic and graphic variations, into the Etruscan Sehtume (genitive Sehtumna). The common genitive Septumius/ Septimius is a regular derivation from the older Latin * Septumos. Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg) Bibliography Salomies, 111-114…

Servius

(1,028 words)

Author(s): Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg) | Suerbaum, Werner (Munich)
[German version] [1] Roman praenomen Rare Roman praenomen; Siglum: SER, at times confused with Sergius; carried by King S. Tullius in the 6th cent. BC. Up to the Imperial Period, it was used mainly by the noble families of Cornelii, Fulvii and Sulpicii. The nomen gentile Servīlius is derived from S., specifically from an undocumented diminutive of S. The etymology is regarded as uncertain, but an Etruscan origin is unlikely. Present-day scholarship is largely unanimous in regarding the ancient opinion that S. Tullius was the son of a slave as based on the similarity in sound of servus, 'sla…

Orthography

(1,124 words)

Author(s): Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg)
Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg) [German version] A. General (CT) This article covers only phenomena appertaining to alphabetic scripts (an example of a syllabic script would be the Mycenaean). Shorthand scripts are also excluded; although the standardization of abbreviations certainly falls within the scope of orthography. The word ὀρθογραφία, 'correct spelling; spelling according to accepted usage', is attested since the 2nd cent. BC (cf. the grammarian Tryphon). Since Antiquity, orthography has signif…

Vopiscus

(74 words)

Author(s): Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg)
[German version] Uncommon Roman praenomen (in Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 9,37,1 Οὐοπῖσκος/ Ouopîskos) to be found in V. Iulius ( cos. in 473 BC). According to ancient evidence, vopīscus is a term for a child whose twin is stillborn. The etymology of the term is disputed. As a cognomen, it appears in one of the alleged authors of the Historia Augusta , Flavius V. Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg) Bibliography Salomies, 59-60; 141; 275  Walde/Hofmann 2, 835.

Postumus

(964 words)

Author(s): Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg) | Manthe, Ulrich (Passau) | Franke, Thomas (Bochum)
[English version] [1] Röm. Praenomen Röm. Praenomen, das wie andere der sog. “Numeralpraenomina” (Quintus) Kindern nach der Reihenfolge der Geburt gegeben wurde: das Adj. p., “letzter”, meint hier “(weil) nach (dem Tod des Vaters) geboren” (vgl. P. [2]). Bei den Römern war P. bis ins 3. Jh. v. Chr. als Vorname in Gebrauch, dann nur noch als Cognomen. Die weitere Verbreitung eines ital. Individualnamens * Postumo- läßt sich aus der Entlehnung ins Etr. erschließen, wo daraus ein Gent. Pustmi-na- (CIE 8715) gebildet wurde; dies entspricht dem röm. Gent. Postumius. Steinbauer, Dieter (…

Indo-Europeans

(1,054 words)

Author(s): Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg)
[German version] A. Definition, general, methods I. refers to both the carriers of individual  Indo-European languages and those of reconstructed proto-Indo-European (proto-Indo-European basic language) or for instance of proto-Greek. The proof provided at the beginning of the 19th cent. of the linguistic affinity has given rise to the question who the speakers of the basic language were. With this new concept, the postulate was introduced into prehistory that a people with a characteristic culture sh…

Proculus

(644 words)

Author(s): Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg) | Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main) | Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Franke, Thomas (Bochum) | Heimgartner, Martin (Halle) | Et al.
Roman praenomen ( P. Iulius, a contemporary of Romulus [1]), and secondarily a cognomen. Depending on the form, a diminutive (older * prokelo-) of the stem * proko- (~ classical procus 'wooer, suitor'), it originally perhaps meant 'the one who demands or claims (the inheritance?)'. Proca (King of Alba Longa) can also be regarded as etymologically connected. The praenomen, which had already become rare at an early time, survived in derivatives, the gentilician names Procilius and Proculeius. Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg) [German version] [1] Roman jurist, 1st cent. The jurist fro…

Volusus

(87 words)

Author(s): Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg)
[German version] (also Volesus). Uncommon Latin praenomen , probably adopted from an ancient tradition without rhotacism. Etymologically, it is related, with ablaut, to the root of val-ēre 'to be strong and healthy' and to the nomen gentile Valerius . Secondarily as a cognomen in L. Valerius Messalla V. ( cos. in AD 5; Valerius [II 22]). A V. is considered the ancestor of the Valerii (Valerius [I 10]). The nomina gentilia Volus(i)enus and Volusius are derived from the praenomen. Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg) Bibliography Salomies, 61; 322  Walde/Hofmann 2, 727.

Satem languages

(242 words)

Author(s): Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg)
[German version] In phonetics and phonology, the term satem (Avest. satəm, ‘hundred’) is employed to characterize those Indo-European languages which - unlike centum languages - preserve the Proto-Indo-European (PIE) series of palatal stops , , g̑h as independent phonemes. The change of palatal tectals (Gutturals) into affricates (such as č, ć) or fricatives is a common phenomenon in the history of languages. Not all languages did necessarily take the same path in the development from PIE * k̑ṃtó- to Avestan satəm, Sanskrit śatám, Lithuanian šim̃tas or Old Church Slavonic sto. …

Titus

(1,331 words)

Author(s): Wick, Peter (Basle) | Rist, Josef (Würzburg) | Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] I Greek (Τίτος/ Títos). [German version] [I 1] Companion of Paul Important 'assistant' and 'partner' of Paul (Paulus [II 2]; 2 Cor 8,23), of unknown origin. Taken by Paul to the Apostles' Convent in Jerusalem as a 'Gentile Christian', he was not compelled to be circumcised there, in spite of the demands of the Judaists (Gal 2:1-3). Paul sent T. to Corinth on several occasions as his negotiator (2 Cor 7:6 f.; 7:13 f.; he also appeared as an independent co-organizer of the collects: 8:6; 8:16 …

Sextus

(2,046 words)

Author(s): Holzhausen, Jens (Bamberg) | Frede, Michael (Oxford) | Steinbauer, Dieter (Regensburg) | Rist, Josef (Würzburg)
I Greek [German version] [I 1] Author of a collection of 'gnomes' The name 'Sextus' is associated with a Greek collection of 610 maxims (Gnome) in all, known from two Greek MSS (Patm. 263, Vat. Gr. 742; Pap. Palau Rib. 225v, c. AD 400 offers 21 'gnomes'); they probably originated c. AD 200. Origenes [2] is the first to mention the title Σέξτου γνῶμαι ( Séxtou gnômai), remarking among other things that 'most Christians read them' (Orig. Contra Celsum 8,30). In about 399, Rufinus [II 6] Tyrannius translated a collection of 451 maxims into Latin, naming as author…
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