Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Nutton, Vivian (London)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Nutton, Vivian (London)" )' returned 375 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Anonymus Parisinus

(350 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] Paris, BN, suppl. gr. 636, contains excerpts from a doxological work about acute and chronic diseases. C. Daremberg first discovered its significance for the history of medicine in his 1851 edition of Oribasius, p. XL, and collated at least two other MSS, without ever producing an edition. Following a hint by G. Costomiris, R. Fuchs took over the editio princeps in 1894 on the basis of two Paris MSS [1] but caused confusion by separating the doxographic part from the therapeutic part. Fuchs did not edit the section on acute diseases unt…

Pulse

(548 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (σφυγμός/ sphygmós, Latin pulsus). Although a pounding pulse was long recognized as an indication of illness, it seems to have been Aristotle [6] (Hist. an. 521a; De respiratione 479b) who was the first to connect the phenomenon with the heart [1]. His assertion that the pulse was a normal, constant presence in all blood vessels was disproved by Praxagoras, who was able to show that only arteries had a pulse. His view that arteries contained only pneûma and functioned independent of the heart was in turn questioned by his pupil Herophil…

Callianax

(110 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (Καλλιάναξ; Kalliánax). Doctor, adherent of  Herophilus [1] and member of his ‘house’, which possibly refers to the fact that he worked in the mid 3rd cent. BC [1].  Bacchius [1] in his memoir on the early followers of Herophilus (Galen in Hippocratis Epidemiarum 6 comment. 4,10 = CMG V 10,2,2,203), mentions that C. quoted Homer and the Greek tragic writers if his patients told him that they were afraid of dying. He gave them to understand by this that only the immortals could esca…

Acron [of Acragas]

(131 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (Ἄκρων; Ákrōn) [of Acragas] Son of a doctor of the same name (Diog. Laert. 8,65), older contemporary of Hippocrates. He was supposed to have rid Athens of the pest by lighting big fires in 430 BC (Plut. De Is. et Os. 80 [cf. 1]). The  Empiricists (Ps.-Gal. 14,638) considered A. as founder of their school and as such he entered the doxographic tradition [2]. It is possible that he participated in the debates regarding the epistemological value of sensory perception (he was familiar …

Euryphon of Cnidus

(339 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] Greek physician, mid 5th cent. BC. The story recounted in Sor. Vita Hipp. 5, that E. cured Perdiccas II of Macedonia of an illness caused by unrequited love, arose comparatively late and is rather fantastical. According to Galen (17a,886), he provided the most important contributions to the so-called ‘Cnidian Sentences’, which have survived only in fragments [1. 65-66; 2. 14-26]. In the opinion of some ancient scholars some of his works, especially those dealing with dietetics, were taken up into the Hippocratic Corpus (Gal. 6,473; 7,960; 16,3). E. regarded disea…

Summaria Alexandrinorum

(296 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] In Late Antiquity in Alexandria [1] writings by Galenus and to a lesser extent by Hippocrates [6] were assembled into a medical compendium. Known as the '16 Books of Galen', it covers the basic areas of medicine  (including anatomy, physiology and therapeutics). According to Arab sources [1], a number of teachers ( Iatrosophistḗs ) in Alexandria are supposed to have written a series of summaries or abridgements of the books contained in this compendium, which were then collected under the title SA and translated into Arabic and perhaps also into Hebrew [2]. In…

Philagrius

(127 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (Φιλάγριος; Philágrios). Doctor from Epirus, fl. 3rd-4th cents. AD; he practised in Thessalonica and was the author of more than 70 books: treatises on dietetics, gout, dropsy and rabies as well as a commentary on Hippocrates [1]. He is often cited by later authors, especially in Arabic, for his treatment of diseases of the liver and spleen. Doctrinally, he often follows Galen, but pays particular attention to pneuma (Pneumatists) as the co-ordinating force in organisms. His name appears often in garbled form as Filaretus (e.g. frr. 131-133: Rhazes, Continens, V…

Lippitudo

(175 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] An eye disease characterized by exudation, covering a variety of specific diseases like trachoma and conjunctivitis. A dry variety of lippitudo, xerophthalmía, in which the purulent eyes become stuck shut over night is also described (Celsus, De medicina 6,6,29). Celsus [7] (ibid. 6,6,2) reports a large number of ointments and other agents against lippitudo, an extremely common condition; this is confirmed by many ‘oculists' stamps’ for eye ointments ( Kollyrion) with the inscriptions ‘against lippitudo’ and by the large number of manufacturers of such …

Adamantius

(110 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] [1] Doctor Doctor and iatrosophist, who as Jew was expelled from Alexandria in c. AD 412, converted to Christianity in Constantinople and returned to Alexandria. Author of an abridged version of the Physiognomy of  Polemon of Laodicea, (ed. R. Förster 1893). Some prescriptions, which are ascribed to him, are handed down by Oribasius (Syn. ad Eustathium 2,58-59; 3,24-25; 9,57). He is probably not the author of the treatise ‘About the Winds’, Ed. V. Rose 1864), which refers to Peripatetic meteorology and apparently dates from the 3rd cent. AD.  …

Vulva

(163 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] According to Varro [2] (Rust. 2,1,19) derived from Latin volvere, 'roll', by which is meant the swathing of a fetus. In the early Imperial Period, vulva, like matrix, was used in addition to the technical term uterus as a term for the womb [1]. All three terms remained in use throughout Antiquity; in late Latin medical authors, vulva seldom occurs. In the course of time the term changed in meaning, in that it also included the vagina (Celsus, De medicina 4,1,12) and even the clitoris (Iuv. 6,129). In his Etymology (Isid. Orig. 11,1,137), Isidorus [9] of Seville connec…

Archiatros

(357 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (ἀρχιατρός; archiatrós). In the original use of the name during Hellenistic times, archiatros was the title of the king's personal physician. The term first appeared in connection with the Seleucids (IDelos 1547, cf. TAM V 1,689). A similar title, wr sinw, ‘supreme physician’, is documented in pre-Ptolemaic Egyptian texts; it is missing from early Ptolemaic papyri purely by accident. Dating to 50 BC, documentations are extant from Egypt (Athenagoras, SB 5216) and Pontus (IDelos 1573) [2. 218-226]. A physician known at t…

Anonymus Londiniensis

(480 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] The papyrus inventory no. 137 of the British Library in London is the most important surviving medical papyrus. It was written towards the turn of the 1st to the 2nd cent. and is divided into three parts: columns 1-4,17 contain a list of definitions that concern the páthē of body and soul (cf. the discussion in Gal. Meth. med. 1); columns 4,21-20,50, present different views about the causes of diseases; columns 21,1-39,32 deal with physiology. The text as well as many internal characteristics indicate that these chapters, thou…

Pleistonicus

(351 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (Πλειστόνικος; Pleistónikos). Doctor fl. c. 270 BC; he was a pupil of Praxagoras of Cos (Celsus, De medicina, proem. 20) and one of the 'classics' of Greek medicine in the so-called Dogmatic tradition (Dogmatists [2]; Gal. Methodus medendi 2,5; Gal. De examinando medico 5,2). It is difficult to assess his individuality, as, according to tradition- i.e. fundamentally in Galen - his views are transmitted as being in agreement with those of Praxagoras or other Dogmatists. Like his master…

Agnellus [of Ravenna]

(294 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] Iatrosophist and commentator of medical texts around AD 600, Milan. Ambr. G 108 f. contains his commentaries on Galen's De sectis, Ars medica, De pulsibus ad Teuthram and Ad Glauconem, just as they were recorded by Simplicius (not the famous Aristotle commentator!). The first mentioned is in many places in agreement with a commentary which is ascribed to Iohannes Alexandrinus or Gesius, as well as Greek passages of text, which are associated with Iohannes and Archonides (?). As controversial as the question …

Charmis

(123 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (Χάρμις; Chármis) Greek physician from Massilia, who went to Rome c. AD 55. Thanks to his cold-water cures he soon made a name there, and gained many wealthy patients (Plin. HN 29,10). For one treatment he invoiced a patient from the provinces for HS 200,000 (Plin. HN 29, 22), and demanded a similarly exorbitant price of 1,000 Attic drachmas for a single dose of an antidote (Gal. 14,114,127). During his lifetime C. invested HS 20 million in public construction projects in Massilia, and at h…

Lead poisoning

(406 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] Even though the analysis of skeletons has shown that lead played a larger role in the classical period than in prehistoric times, the measured values are lower than expected in view of the considerable rise in lead production between 600 BC and AD 500 and its use in the manufacture of household goods and water pipes [1; 2; 3]. As the symptoms of lead poisoning (LP) are very similar to other diseases, there are hardly any descriptions which can be taken as referring to it unambiguo…

Aretaeus

(401 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (Ἀρεταῖος; Aretaîos) of Cappadocia. Greek Hippocratic physician who was influenced by Pneumatic theory. [13] therefore assigned him to the middle of the 1st cent. AD. A.'s name was first mentioned in the late 2nd. cent as the author of a text about prophylactics in Ps.-Alex. Aphr. De febribus 1, 92, 97, 105. However, Galen repeats A.'s story of a leper that appeared in Morb. chron. 4,13,20 without any reference to the source in Subfig. emp. 10 = Deichgräber 75-9. Thirty years later…

Galen of Pergamum

(3,449 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
(Γαλήνος; Galḗnos) [German version] A. Life AD 129 to c. 216, Greek doctor and philosopher. As the son of a prosperous architect named Aelius or Iulius Nicon (not Claudius, as older accounts have it), G. enjoyed a wide education, especially in philosophy. When he was 17, Asclepius appeared to Nicon in a dream which turned G. towards a medical career. After studying with Satyrus, Aiphicianus and Stratonicus in Pergamum, G. went to Smyrna c. 149 to learn from Pelops, a pupil of the Hippocratic Quintus. From there he journeyed to Corinth to find Numisianus, another pupi…

Theodas

(102 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (Θεοδᾶς; Theodâs) from Laodicea. Greek physician c. 125 AD; he and Menodotus [2] were pupils of the sceptic Antiochus [20]; he was a leading representative of the School of the Empiricists. He wrote (1.) Chief points (Κεφάλαια), which Galenus and a later (otherwise unknown) Theodosius commented on; (2.) On the parts of medicine (Περὶ τῶν τῆς ἰατρικῆς μερῶν), in which he emphasised the significance of autopsy, historíē ('research') and analogy; (3.) an Introduction to medicine (Εἰσαγώγη). His works were  still being copied in the 3rd cent. in Egypt. Only…

Training (medical)

(600 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] Although most healers in Antiquity learned their trade from their fathers or as autodidacts, some also went to study with a master (e.g. Pap. Lond. 43, 2nd cent. BC), or travelled to medical strongholds to receive training. Remains of these teaching centres are to be found in Babylonia [1] and in Egypt, where the ‘House of Life’ in Sais, rebuilt by Darius c. 510 BC, may have served as such a centre and scriptorium [2]. If, in the Greek world, the Hippocratic tradition (Hippocrates) emphasized the superiority of healers trained at Cos, Cnidus …

Surgery

(1,412 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] A. Egyptian The high prestige widely accorded to Egyptian medical practitioners for their surgical skills (Hdt. 3,129), was well-earned. Skeletal finds show the successful treatment of bone fractures, esp. in the arms, and rare cases of trepanation. However, there is no reliable indication of surgical intervention in body cavities [1; 2]. The great diversity of knives, spoons, saws and needles reflects a highly-developed specialism, rooted in wide-ranging medical practice. Early pap…

Iatromaia

(95 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (‘birth-helper’, ‘midwife’). Midwifery was usually practiced by women but was not exclusively in their hands. A Parian inscription, for example, records two male birth-helpers (IG 12,5,199) and the preserved treatises on midwifery address a male readership. Iatromaia as an occupational name appears in two Roman inscriptions of the 3rd and 4th cents. AD (CIL 6,9477f.); in one, a Valeria Verecunda is named as the ‘first iatromaia in her region’, an epithet that seems to refer to the quality of her work rather than a position in a collegium.  Midwife Nutton, Vivian (Lon…

Hospital

(2,037 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] A. Definition Hospital in the sense of public institutions for the medical care of exclusively sick people are not encountered before the 4th cent. AD, and even then the majority of terms used (Greek xenṓn, xenodocheîon, ptōcheîon, gerontokomeíon, Latin xenon, xenodochium, ptochium, gerontocomium, valetudinarium; ‘guesthouse’, ‘pilgrims' hostel’, ‘poorhouse’, ‘old people's home’, ‘hospital’) point to a diversity of functions, target groups and services that partly overlap with each other. Private houses for sick members o…

Gesius

(298 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] or Gessios, from Petra (Steph. Byz. s.v. Γέα/ Géa), physician and teacher, end of the 5th/early 6th cent. AD, close friend of Aeneas [3] (Epist. 19; 20) and Procopius of Gaza (Epist. 38; 58; 123; 134). He studied medicine under the Jew Domnos (Suda s.v. Γέσιος/ Gésios) in Alexandria, where he practised as   iatrosophistḗs (teacher of medicine). Although opposed to Christianity, he was baptized at the instigation of the emperor Zeno but retained a cynically negative attitude towards his new religion. He protected th…

Mnesitheus

(118 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (Μνησίθεος; Mnēsítheos). Athenian doctor, fl. 350 BC. His tomb was seen by Paus. (1,37,4). He was wealthy enough to erect statues and was one of the dedicators of the beautiful ex-voto inscription to Asclepius IG II2 1449. He is frequently associated with Dieuches [1]; he wrote extensively about dietetics including diets for children, and is counted amongst the more important Dogmatic physicians (Dogmatists) [1]. Galen ascribes to him a logical classification of illnesses that follows Plato's method (fr. 10,11 Bert…

Eryximachus

(89 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[German version] (Ερυξίμαχος; Eryxímachos) Son of  Acumenus, Athenian doctor and Asclepiad, 5th cent. BC. As a friend of the sophist Hippias (Pl. Prt. 315A) and of Phaedrus (Pl. Phdr. 268A; Symp. 177A), he plays an important part in Plato's Symposium, in which he delivers a long speech in honour of Eros (185E-188E). His slightly pedantic manner earns him only the good-natured laughter of the invited guests but contemporary parallels to his linking of natural philosophy and medicine can be found in the Corpus Hippocraticum. Nutton, Vivian (London)

Medicine

(5,440 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
Nutton, Vivian (London) [German version] A. Introduction (CT) The history of Classical medicine developed in different ways in the three cultures of Byzantium, Islam (Arabic medicine, Arabic-Islamic Cultural Sphere) and Latin Christianity. The first two shared a heritage of late-Antique Galenism, which was far less pervasive in Western Europe and Northern Africa than in the Greek world and among the Syriac Christians of the Near East. From the 11th cent. onwards, Western Europe rediscovered Galenism lar…

Corpus Medicorum

(178 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] This research project was begun in 1901 at the suggestion of the Danish scholar Johan Ludvig Heiberg and with the assistance of the Saxon and Danish Academies of Science and the Puschmann Foundation was established in the Berlin Academy of Sciences. Its self-defined task was the editing of all extant ancient medical authors, initially under the directorship of Hermann Diels. Diels' catalogue of manuscripts by Greek physicians (1906), together with a supplement (1907), remains to …

Aeficianus

(82 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Griech. Arzt und Philosoph, Lehrer des Galenos, lebte um 150 n. Chr. in Kleinasien (Gal. 19,58, CMG V 10,2,2, 287). Als langjähriger Schüler des Quintus (Gal. 18A, 575) und Anhänger des Hippokrates interpretierte er zumindest einige ihrer Lehren in stoischerem Sinne, z. B. aus dem Bereich der Psychologie, in der er dem Stoiker Simias folgte (Gal. 19,58; 18b, 654]. Die Hippokratesdeutung, die ihm in der Galenausgabe von Kühn bei Gal. 16,484 zugeschrieben wird, ist eine Renaissancefälschung. Nutton, Vivian (London)

Hippokratismus

(550 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London) RWG
[English version] Obwohl Hippokrates in Byzanz und im christl. Abendland des MA als Begründer der Medizin galt und geradezu zur Legende erhoben wurde, beschäftigte man sich mit den im Corpus Hippocraticum vertretenen Lehren nur auf schmalster Textbasis, wobei man die wenigen Texte entweder nur in der Deutung Galens oder aus den Lemmata der galenischen Hippokrateskommentare kannte. Im MA waren in der westl. Medizin pseudonyme Abhandlungen mindestens ebenso einflußreich wie die Abhandlungen, die unsere heutige Hippokratesausgabe enthält. Ausnahmen bilden die Aphorismen, das Pr…

Erotianos

(297 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Griech. Grammatiker, Mitte oder Ende des 1. Jh. n.Chr., Verfasser eines Glossars hippokratischer Wörter, das er Andromachos [4 oder 5], einem Arzt am kaiserlichen Hof in Rom, widmete [2; 3]. Der überlieferte alphabetische Aufbau des Glossars stammt nicht von E., da er in seinem Vorwort (9), ausdrücklich betont, er habe die Wörter in der Folge ihres Vorkommens in ca. 37 hippokratischen Schriften erklärt, die sich ihrerseits klassifizieren ließen in 1) semiotische, 2) physiologisch…

Philagrios

(114 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (Φιλάγριος). Arzt aus Epeiros, wirkte im 3. bis 4. Jh.n.Chr., praktizierte in Thessalonike; Verf. von mehr als 70 B.: Abh. über Diätetik, Gicht, Wassersucht und Tollwut sowie ein Hippokrates-Komm. [1]. Von späteren, v.a. arabischen Autoren wird er häufig mit seinen therapeutischen Verfahren bei Leber- und Milzkrankheiten zitiert. Was seinen theoretischen Hintergrund betrifft, so folgt er oftmals Galenos, doch legt er besonderen Wert auf das Pneuma (Pneumatiker) als koordinierende Kraft im Organismus. Sein Name wird häufig in Filaretus entstellt (z.B. fr…

Empiriker

(696 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] A. Geschichte Die E. sind eine griech. Ärzteschule, gegr. um 250 v.Chr. von Philinos von Kos, einem Schüler des Herophilos (Ps.-Galen Introductio; Gal. 14,683). Nach Celsus (De med. pr. 10) wurde sie hingegen etwas später von Serapion von Alexandria begründet. Nach einigen Doxographen war der Gründer Akron von Akragas (um 430 v.Chr.; fr. 5-7 Deichgräber). In den medizinischen Doxographien wird sie als eine der drei Hauptströmungen in der griech. Medizin noch zur Zeit des Isidorus v…

Fieber

(375 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (πυρετός, febris) bezeichnet eigentlich ein Symptom, eine erhöhte Körpertemperatur, doch wird der Begriff von allen ant. medizinischen Autoren häufig zur Bezeichnung einer Krankheit oder einer Krankheitsklasse verwendet. Im mod. diagnostischen Sprachgebrauch deckt der Begriff eine Reihe von Zuständen ab, so daß die Identifizierung jedes antiken “F.” ohne weitere Untergliederung von F.-Arten oder ohne sonstige Symptombeschreibung zum Scheitern verurteilt ist. Solche Identifizierung…

Phylotimos

(231 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (Φυλότιμος) von Kos. Arzt und Jahresbeamter ( mónarchos) von Kos in der ersten H. des 3. Jh. v.Chr.; zusammen mit Herophilos [1] war er Schüler des Praxagoras und wurde eine der klass. Autoritäten der griech. Medizin (vgl. Gal. de examinando medico 5,2), auch wenn seine Schriften h. nur noch in Fr. greifbar sind. Er verfolgte anatomische Interessen, legte den Sitz der Seele in das Herz und hielt das Gehirn für eine bloße und überflüssige Ausdehnung des Rückenmarks (Gal. de usu partium 8…

Iatromaia

(92 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (“Geburtshelferin”, “Hebamme”). Geburtshilfe wurde gewöhnlich von Frauen geleistet, lag jedoch nicht ausschließlich in ihren Händen. So berichtet eine parische Inschr. von zwei männlichen Geburtshelfern (IG 12,5,199), außerdem richten sich die erh. geburtshilflichen Schriften an ein männliches Publikum. I. als Berufsbezeichnung taucht auf zwei röm. Inschr. aus dem 3. bzw. 4. Jh. n.Chr. auf (CIL 6,9477f.); in ersterer wird Valeria Verecunda die ‘erste i. in ihrer Gegend’ gen., ein Epitheton, das eher auf die Qualität ihrer Arbeit als auf ei…

Kontagion

(286 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (lat. contagio, “Ansteckung”). Krankheitsübertragung von einer Person auf eine andere auf direktem oder indirektem Wege. Mit K. verbindet sich die Vorstellung der Befleckung; im Judentum z.B. gilt, daß Menschen, die an bestimmten Krankheiten (wie Lepra) leiden, oder etwa menstruierende Frauen gemieden werden müssen (Kathartik). Die angeführten Gründe lassen sich entweder in hygienischem oder rel. Sinne verstehen. Ähnliche Empfehlungen sind auch aus dem alten Babylonien und Grieche…

Krankenhaus

(1,832 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] A. Definition K. im Sinne öffentlicher Einrichtungen zur medizinischen Versorgung ausschließlich Kranker finden sich nicht vor dem 4. Jh.n.Chr., und auch dann noch weist die Vielzahl der verwendeten Bezeichnungen (griech. xenṓn, xenodocheíon, ptōcheíon, gerontokomeíon, lat. xenon, xenodochium, ptochium, gerontocomium, valetudinarium; “Fremdenhaus”, “Pilgerhaus”, “Armenhaus”, “Altersheim”, “K.”) auf eine Vielfalt sich z.T. überschneidender Funktionen, Zielgruppen und Dienstleistungen hin. Privathäuser für kranke Angeh…

Mustio

(181 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (auch Muscio). Übersetzer bzw. Übermittler von zwei gynäkologischen Schriften des Soranos von Ephesos ins Lateinische. Bei der einen handelt es sich um ein kurzes Hdb. von Fragen und Antworten, dessen griech. Fassung verlorengegangen ist, bei der anderen um die berühmte Gynaikeía (‘Gynäkologie). Einige Hss. von M.s Kompendium enden mit einem Anhang, in dem Scheidenpessare aufgelistet sind. Wenn M.s Adaptation auch keine getreue Übers. des Soranos darstellt, so hilft sie doch bei der Konstitution des griech. Textes. In …

Kallianax

(100 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (Καλλιάναξ). Arzt, Anhänger des Herophilos [1] und Mitglied seines “Hauses”, was womöglich darauf hindeutet, daß er Mitte des 3. Jh.v.Chr. tätig war [1]. Bakcheios [1] erwähnt in seiner Denkschrift über die frühen Herophileer (Galen in Hippocratis Epidemiarum 6 comment. 4,10 = CMG V 10,2,2,203), K. habe Homer und die griech. Trag.-Dichter zit., wenn ihm seine Patienten ihre Angst vor dem Sterben bekannt hätten. Damit habe er ihnen zu verstehen gegeben, daß nur Unsterbliche dem To…

Epidemische Krankheiten

(954 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] I. Vor- und Frühgeschichte Seit der mittleren Bronzezeit, d.h. seit ca. 2800 v.Chr., sind e.K., worunter man im weitesten Sinne Krankheiten versteht, die eine große Anzahl von Lebewesen gleichzeitig befallen, arch. bezeugt. Ihr Auftreten wird mit einem Bevölkerungswachstum und der dadurch bedingten Erleichterung der Krankheitsübertragung vom Tier auf den Menschen und von Mensch zu Mensch in Zusammenhang gebracht [9. 251]. In Ägypt. dürften Pocken seit etwa 1250 v.Chr. bekannt gewesen…

Anonymus Parisinus

(337 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Paris, BN, suppl. gr. 636, enthält Auszüge eines doxographischen Werkes über akute und chronische Krankheiten. Seine Bedeutung als medizinhistor. Quelle wurde zuerst von C. Daremberg in seiner Oreibasios-Ausgabe von 1851, S. XL erkannt, der später mindestens zwei weitere Mss. kollationierte, ohne daß es zu einer Edition gekommen wäre. Einem Hinweis von G. Costomiris folgend, übernahm R. Fuchs 1894 die editio princeps auf der Grundlage zweier Pariser Mss. [1], stiftete jedoch dabei Verwirrung, als er den doxographischen vom therapeutischen…

Salpe

(68 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (Σάλπη). Hebamme aus hell. Zeit, deren medizinische und kosmetische Rezepturen Plinius [1] in seiner Historia naturalis (Plin. nat. 28,38; 28,66; 28,82; 28,262; 32,135; 32,140) zitiert. Athenaios [3] (Athen. 322a) kennt eine S. als Verfasserin von παίγνια/ paígnia, “Spielereien”, doch bereitet die Identifizierung der beiden Probleme [1]. Nutton, Vivian (London) Bibliography 1 D. Bain, Salpe's ΠΑΙΓΝΙΑ; Athenaeus 322a and Plin. H. N. 28,38, in: CQ 48, 1998, 262-268.

Praxagoras

(494 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (Πραξαγόρας) von Kos. Arzt, E. des 4. Jh. v. Chr., Lehrer von Herophilos [1], Phylotimos, Pleistonikos und Xenophon. Seine Familie führte ihre Abstammung auf Asklepios zurück, sein gleichnamiger Großvater wie auch sein Vater Nikarchos waren ebenfalls Ärzte. Die Familie gehörte auch noch Generationen nach P. der koischen Prominenz an [1]. Auf einer Statue hat sich ein Gedicht erh., das Krinagoras zu seinen Ehren verfaßte (Anth. Plan. 273). Unter den Werken dieses Arztes findet sich eine Abh. über Therapie in mindestens 4 B., eine Schrift über Kr…

Charmis

(113 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Griech. Arzt aus Massilia, der ca. 55 n.Chr. nach Rom gelangte. Dank seiner Kaltwasserkuren machte er sich dort bald einen Namen und gewann zahlreiche wohlhabende Patienten (Plin. nat. 29,10). Einem aus der Prov. stammenden Patienten stellte er für eine Heilbehandlung HS 200000 in Rechnung (Plin. nat. 29, 22) und verlangte einen vergleichbar exorbitanten Preis von 1000 att. Drachmen für eine einzige Dosis eines Gegengiftes (Gal. 14,114,127). Ch. investierte zu Lebzeiten HS 20 Mio…

Aretaios

(410 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] aus Kappadokien. Griech. Arzt, der als Hippokratiker von pneumatischen Lehren beeinflußt wurde. Von [13] daher in die Mitte des 1. Jh. n. Chr. datiert. Als Autor einer Schrift über Prophylaxe zuerst Ende des 2. Jh. erwähnt von Ps.-Alex. Aphr. De febribus 1, 92, 97, 105 der A.' Namen erwähnt; Galen aber wiederholt in Subfig. emp. 10 = Deichgräber 75-9, die von A. in morb. chron. 4,13,20 geschilderte Gesch. eines Leprosen ohne Quellenangabe. 30 Jahre später behauptete Gal. in Simp.…

Kallimorphos

(78 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Militärarzt, der Lukian (Quomodo historia 16,24 = FGrH II 210) zufolge in einem höchst tragischen und geschraubten Stil unter dem Titel Parthica eine Gesch. der Partherkriege des Lucius Verus in den Jahren 162-166 n.Chr. schrieb. Falls es sich bei ihm nicht um eine Ausgeburt der lukianischen Phantasie handelt, dürfte er im Partherkrieg gedient haben, und zwar entweder in der legio VI Ferrata, oder in einer ala contariorum (einem Truppenflügel von Pikenträgern). Nutton, Vivian (London)

Gesios

(284 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] oder Gessios aus Petra (Steph. Byz. s.v. Γέα), Arzt und Lehrer, E. 5./Anf. 6. Jh. n.Chr., eng befreundet mit Aineias [3] (epist. 19; 20) und Prokopios von Gaza (epist. 38; 58; 123; 134). Er studierte Medizin in Alexandreia bei dem Juden Domnos (Suda s.v. Γέσιος) wo er als iatrosophistḗs (Lehrer der Medizin) tätig war. Obwohl Gegner des Christentums, ließ er sich auf Veranlassung des Kaisers Zenon taufen, blieb freilich bei einer spöttisch ablehnenden Haltung gegenüber seiner neuen Religion. Er beschützte in…

Phanostrate

(63 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (Φανοστράτη). Griech.-athenische Hebamme und Ärztin, dargestellt auf attischen Grabstelen vom E. des 4. Jh.v.Chr. (IG II/III2 6873; Clairmont, 2. 890). Die Verbindung mit der Berufsbezeichnung Hebamme deutet auf einen gewissen Grad der medizinischen Spezialisierung hin und zeigt zugleich, daß Frauen als Ärztinnen tätig sein und beträchtliche Einkünfte erzielen konnten. Für letzteres sprechen Qualität und individuelle Gestaltung der Steinmetzarbeit. Nutton, Vivian (London)

Erasistratos

(932 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] A. Leben Arzt, 4.-3. Jh. v.Chr., geb. in Iulis auf Keos als Sohn des Kleombrotos, eines Arztes des Seleukos I., und der Kretoxene; Bruder und Neffe weiterer Ärzte (fr. 1-8 Garofalo). Die Nachrichten über seinen Bildungsweg sind widersprüchlich, doch scheint eine Verbindung zu Theophrastos und zum Peripatos möglich, wenn man der Nachricht bei Eusebios keine Beachtung schenkt, E. habe den Zenit seiner Laufbahn im Jahre 258 v.Chr. erreicht [7]. Die berufliche Tätigkeit des Vaters und …

Demokedes

(252 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (Δημοκήδης) aus Kroton. Griech. Arzt, wirkte um 500 v.Chr. und war Hdt. 3,125 zufolge der beste Arzt seiner Zeit. Er war der Sohn des Kalliphon und praktizierte in Kroton, bevor er nach Aigina ging. Nach einem Jahr nahm ihn die Stadt Aigina für ein Talent als Gemeindearzt in Dienst, wiederum ein Jahr später wechselte er bei höherem Gehalt nach Athen und schließlich in den Dienst des Polykrates von Samos, der zwei Talente zahlte. Nach dessen Ermordung wurde D. als Sklave nach Susa…

Agnellus [von Ravenna]

(293 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Iatrosophist und Kommentator medizinischer Texte um 600 n. Chr. Mailand, Ambr. G 108 f. enthält seine Komm. über Galens De sectis, Ars medica, De pulsibus ad Teuthram und Ad Glauconem, wie sie von Simplicius (nicht der berühmte Aristoteleskommentator!) festgehalten wurden. Der erstgenannte entspricht an vielen Stellen einem Komm., der Iohannes Alexandrinus oder Gesios zugeschrieben wird, sowie griech. Textpassagen, die mit Iohannes und Archonides (?) in Verbindung gebracht werden. So umstritten die Frage ist…

Akesidas

(52 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Paus. 5,14 zufolge wurde A. in Olympia als Held angesehen und war an anderer Stelle unter dem Namen Idas bekannt. Sein Name läßt vermuten, daß er als Heilgott verehrt wurde, der womöglich mit Paionios, Iason und Herakles einen auf dem Peloponnes weit verbreiteten Heilkult teilte. Nutton, Vivian (London)

Genfer Gelöbnis

(115 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London) RWG
[English version] Eine der ersten Amtshandlungen der 1947 gegr. Weltgesundheitsorganisation bestand in der Abfassung des G. G., einer zeitgemäßen Neuformulierung des hippokratischen Eides, die 1968 weitere Verbesserungen erfuhr. Der sog. Abtreibungsparagraph und das Chirurgieverbot machten zeitgemäßeren, allg. Vorschriften Platz, das menschliche Leben vom Zeitpunkt der Empfängnis an zu achten und medizinisches Wissen stets in Einklang mit den Geboten der Menschlichkeit einzusetzen. Zwar blieb es b…

Archigenes

(323 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] aus Apameia. Arzt, Schüler des Agathinos, lebte unter Trajan (98-117 n. Chr.) und starb im Alter von 63 Jahren (Suda s. v. Archigenes). Er war Eklektiker und stand der hippokratischen Auffassung nahe, Krankheit entstehe durch eine Dyskrasie von Heiß, Kalt, Feucht und Trocken. A. stand bes. unter dem Einfluß der Pneumatiker und schrieb ausführlich über die Pulslehre. Seine Auflistung der 8 verschiedenen Pulsqualitäten kritisiert Galen (8,625-635) als zu subtil. Einige der von A. g…

Geisteskrankheiten

(938 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] A. Naher Osten G. werden sowohl in jüd. wie auch in babylon. Texten beschrieben. Teils werden körperliche Symptome genannt wie bei der Epilepsie, teils Verhaltensweisen beschrieben wie in 1 Sam 16,14-16; 21,13-15, doch werden alle G. dem Eingreifen Gottes oder seit 500 v.Chr. einer Vielzahl von Dämonen zugeschrieben [1]. Die Behandlung beschränkt sich dabei auf Arrest (Jer 29,26-8) oder exorzistische Praktiken einschließlich Musik, doch faßten die jüd. “Therapeuten” auch die gesamte…

Definitiones medicae

(213 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Die Verwendung von definitiones (“Erörterungen”) war in der medizinischen Lehre - sowohl in der griech. als auch in der röm. - weit verbreitet (Gal. 1,306 K.; 19,346-7 K.). Das umfangreichste erh. Werk dieser Art sind die Galen zugeschriebenen d.m. (19,346-462 K.), deren Echtheit bereits in der Spätant. angezweifelt wurde (Schol. in Oreib. Syn, CMG 6,2,1, 250,29). Wellmann [1. 66] vertrat die Meinung, daß der Verf. gegen Ende des 1. Jh.n.Chr. lebte und der pneumatischen Schule angehörte. Aber auch wenn das Werk pneum…

Akumenos [aus Athen]

(61 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Arzt des späten 5. Jh. v. Chr. Als Vater des Arztes Eryximachos, der mit Sokrates und Phaidros befreundet war, taucht A. kurz als fiktiver Gesprächspartner in Plat. Phaidr. 268a und 269a auf, um die These zu unterstreichen, die ärztliche Kunst umfasse mehr als lediglich das aus Büchern und von Lehrern gewonnene Wissen. Nutton, Vivian (London)

Largius Designatianus

(89 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Medizinschriftsteller, 4. Jh. n.Chr., Verf. einer lat. Paraphrase eines griech. Briefes an einen (nicht näher bestimmten) König Antigonos, der unter dem Namen des Hippokrates [6] überl. ist und einen Diätplan sowie Therapieempfehlungen für Kopf-, Brust-, Bauch- und Nierenkrankheiten enthält. Diese Paraphrase hat sich in der Einleitung zu einer medizinischen Abh. von Marcellus Empiricus erh., wo ihr ein Brief des L. an seine Söhne vorangestellt ist. Es ist wahrscheinlich, daß beid…

Aderlaß

(345 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] In babylonischer, ägypt. wie auch griech. Medizin war der Blutentzug Teil der ärztlichen Behandlung. Der Eingriff wurde gelegentlich durch direktes Eröffnen einer Vene vorgenommen, durch Anritzen derselben oder durch Verwendung eines Schröpfkopfes, der das Blut zu einem kleinen Einstich saugte. Gemessen an der Häufigkeit, mit der Schröpfköpfe auf Ärztedarstellungen abgebildet wurden, scheint die letztgenannte Methode die verbreitetste gewesen zu sein [1]. Für den A. mögen zwei Vo…

Augenheilkunde

(954 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] A. Ägyptisch Ägyptische Augenärzte standen bereits in hohem Ansehen, als der persische König Kyros den Pharao Amasis um 540 v.Chr. um Vermittlung eines solchen Augenarztes bat (Hdt. 3,1; vgl. 2,84). In Ägypten waren Augenkrankheiten keine Seltenheit. Drei von sieben frühen medizinischen Papyri handeln von ihnen. Allein im Pap. Ebers finden sich über 100 Rezepte gegen Blindheit. Einige Rezepte verwenden Ingredienzen aus der Dreckapotheke, andere beispielsweise Leber, die reich an V…

Pneumatiker

(448 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (πνευματικοί, lat. pneumatici). Medizinische Schule innerhalb der griech. Medizin, gegründet von Athenaios [6] von Attaleia unter dem Einfluß des Stoizismus. Galenos (de causis contentivis 2) erklärt Athenaios zum Schüler des Poseidonios [2], was auf eine Lebenszeit in der 2. H. des 1. Jh.v.Chr. hindeutet. Allerdings weiß Cornelius Celsus [7], der Mitte des 1. Jh.n.Chr. in Rom schrieb, offenbar nichts von dieser Schulrichtung, deren berühmteste Vertreter Agathinos, Herodotos [3], A…

Mnesitheos

(112 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (Μνησίθεος). Athenischer Arzt, um 350 v.Chr. Sein Grab beschreibt Paus. 1,37,4. Er war wohlhabend genug, um Statuen errichten zu können, und einer der Stifter der schönen Weihinschr. IG II2 1449 an Asklepios. M. wurde oft mit Dieuches [1] in Verbindung gebracht; er schrieb ausführlich über Diätetik einschließlich der Ernährung von Kindern und wird zu den bedeutenderen dogmatischen Ärzten gezählt (Dogmatiker) [1]. Galenos schreibt ihm eine an Platon logisch orientierte Klassifizierung von Krankheiten zu (fr.…

Medizinische Ethik

(1,192 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] A. Einleitung M.E. läßt sich definieren als das Verhalten von Heilkundigen gegenüber denjenigen, die sie heilen wollen. Wie es sich im einzelnen darstellt, variiert je nach Gruppenzugehörigkeit des Heilkundigen bzw. der Ges., in der er tätig ist. Zudem können Heilende und zu Heilende durchaus unterschiedliche Ansichten zur m.E. haben. Ein Verhalten im gen. Sinne läßt sich gesetzlich bzw. standesrechtlich oder außerrechtlich durch die sanktionierende Kraft der öffentlichen Meinung oder der Meinung einzelner Gruppen regeln. Nutton, Vivian (London) …

Aelius Promotus

(90 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Aus Alexandreia stammend, war A. in der 1. Hälfte des 2. Jh. als Arzt und Schriftsteller tätig. Er schrieb über Arzneimittel und sympathetische Heilmittel [1; 2]. Die Mss. zählen zu den Schriften von A. auch eine Abhandlung über Toxikologie [3], deren Kern zur Zeit des A. entstand und die anscheinend eine der Hauptquellen für Aetios [3] von Amida war, auch wenn sie Spuren zwischenzeitlicher Überarbeitungen zeigt. Nutton, Vivian (London) Bibliography 1 E. Rohde, KS Bd.1, 1901, 380-410 2 M. Wellmann, in: SBAW 1908, 772-777 3 S. Ihm, 1995.

Chrysermos von Alexandreia

(116 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (IDélos 1525). Ch. lebte ca. 150-120 v.Chr.; Verwaltungsbeamter, “Verwandter des Königs Ptolemaios”, Exegetes (d.h. Leiter des öffentlichen Dienstes in Alexandria), Direktor des Museums und ἐπὶ τῶν ἰατρῶν, ein Titel, der oftmals so verstanden wurde, als bezeichne er den für alle Ärzte Ägyptens Verantwortlichen, woraus wiederum der Schluß auf eine staatliche Ärzteorganisation gezogen wurde. Kudlien vertritt hingegen die Ansicht, daß sich dieser Titel auf den Bevollmächtigten für d…

Anonymus de herbis

(71 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Verschiedene Dioskurides-Mss. enthalten ein anonymes, 215 hexametrische Verse umfassendes Gedicht über die Eigenschaften von Kräutern, das wahrscheinlich im 3. Jh. in hoch stilisiertem Griech. geschrieben wurde. Es geht auf Nikandros, Dioskurides und Andromachos [4, d. Ä.] zurück. Die Dichtersprache hat nach [1] Verbindungen zu den Orphika (neueste Ausgabe: [1; vgl. 2]). Nutton, Vivian (London) Bibliography 1 E. Heitsch, in: AAWG 1964, 23-38 2 NGAW 1963, 2, 44-49.

Numisianos

(203 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (Νουμισιανός). Anatom und Lehrer der Medizin im 2. Jh.n.Chr. Als Schüler von Quintus schrieb er zahlreiche griech. Werke zur Anatomie, die jedoch von seinem Sohn Herakleianos gehortet und später bei einem Brand zerstört wurden (Galenos, Administrationes anatomicae 14,1). Auch wenn Galenos lobend erwähnt, daß N. die Anatomie gefördert habe, schreibt er ihm keine einzige Entdeckung zu. Wie andere Ärzte in Alexandreia kommentierte auch N. hippokratische Texte (Galenos, In Hippocrati…

Pleistonikos

(322 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (Πλειστόνικος). Arzt, wirkte um 270 v.Chr., Schüler von Praxagoras von Kos (Celsus, De medicina, praef. 20) und einer der “Klassiker” der griech. Medizin in der sog. Dogmatischen Trad. (Dogmatiker [2]; Gal. methodus medendi 2,5; Gal. de examinando medico 5,2). Seine Persönlichkeit auszumachen, fällt schwer, da der Überl. - d.h. im wesentlichen Galenos - zufolge seine Ansichten mit denen des Praxagoras oder anderer Dogmatiker übereinstimmten. Wie sein Lehrer war auch P. ein überze…

Galenos aus Pergamon

(3,268 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] A. Leben 129 bis ca. 216 n.Chr., griech. Arzt und Philosoph. Als Sohn eines wohlhabenden Architekten namens Aelius oder Iulius Nikon (nicht Claudius, wie ältere Ausgaben wollen) genoß G. eine breitangelegte Erziehung, v.a. in der Philos. Als er 17 Jahre alt war, erschien Asklepios dem Nikon in einem Traum, der G. für die medizinische Laufbahn bestimmte. Nach einem Studium bei Satyros, Aiphikianos und Stratonikos in Pergamon ging G. ca. 149 nach Smyrna, um Pelops, einen Schüler des …

Herakleianos

(127 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Arzt und Anatom aus Alexandreia, wirkte um 152 n.Chr. Der Sohn des Anatomen und Lehrers Numisianos stellte einen Auszug von dessen Lehre zusammen (Gal. de musculorum dissectione 18B, 926, 935 K.), in dem er ein beachtliches anatomisches Wissen unter Beweis stellte (Gal. Admin. anat. 16,1). Er unterhielt sich mit Galen bei dessen Ankunft in Alexandreia um 151 n.Chr., seinen anatomischen Vorlesungen folgte Galen mit anfänglichem Wohlwollen (CMG V,9,1, S. 70). Als Galen später die n…

Adamantios

(93 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Arzt und Iatrosophist, der als Jude um ca. 412 n. Chr. aus Alexandreia vertrieben wurde, in Konstantinopel zum Christentum konvertierte und nach Alexandreia zurückkehrte. Autor einer Kurzfassung der Physiognomik des Polemon aus Laodikeia, (Ed. R. Förster 1893). Einige Rezepturen, die ihm zugeschrieben werden, sind von Oreibasios (Syn. ad Eustathium 2,58-59; 3,24-25; 9,57) überliefert worden. Vermutlich ist er nicht der Autor der Abhandlung ›Über die Winde‹, Ed. V. Rose 1864), die…

Eustochios

(47 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] aus Alexandreia. Traf gegen Ende seines Lebens (ca. 269 n.Chr.) Plotin und wurde von ihm zur Philos. bekehrt. Er wirkte auch als dessen Arzt, begleitete ihn auf seiner letzten Reise und war bei seinem Tod zugegen (Porphyrios v. Plot. 7). Nutton, Vivian (London)

Lepra

(367 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] auch “Hansen-Krankheit”. Eine chronische, durch das Mycobacterium leprae hervorgerufene Erkrankung mit Befall der peripheren Nerven, zumeist auch der Haut. Paläopathologische Funde belegen ihr Vorkommen im mediterranen Raum erst für die hell. Zeit [1], doch enthalten Texte aus Babylon, Ägypten und Israel schon seit etwa 800 v.Chr. Beschreibungen entstellender Hautkrankheiten, zu denen man, wenn sich solche Beschreibungen auch eher auf die Psoriasis beziehen, auch die L. zählen könnte. M…

Hikesios

(103 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Griech. Arzt, Oberhaupt einer erasistrateischen Schule in Smyrna, frühes 1. Jh. v.Chr. (Strab. 12,8,20); schrieb über Diätetik (Plin. nat. 14,130; 20,35; 27,31), Embryologie (Tert. de anima 25) und Zahnschmerz (Plin. 12,40). Erfinder eines berühmten schwarzen Pflasters, das “bei jeder Wundart helfe” (Galen 13,787). Galen, der vier verschiedene Rezepturen für dieses Mittel anführt (13,780; 787; 810; 812) und dabei auf vier Autoren (Andromachos [5] d.J., Heras, Herakleides [27] und…

Krankenhaus

(539 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London) RWG
[English version] In der Spätant. war das K. ein Ort innerhalb eines rel. geprägten Umfeldes, an dem man sich um Notleidende einschließlich alter und kranker Menschen kümmerte. Im Früh-MA entstanden entlang der großen Pilgerrouten Ketten kleinerer Herbergen. Viele Benediktinerklöster verfügten über eigene Krankenstationen, die auch den Bedürfnissen einer breiteren Öffentlichkeit gedient haben mögen. Vom 11. Jh. an wurden K. unter dem erneuten Einfluß des östl. Mittelmeerraums - allerdings ohne Bin…

Anonymus Londiniensis

(475 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Der Papyrus inv. 137 der British Library in London ist der wichtigste überlieferte medizinische Papyrus. Er wurde Ende des 1., Anf. des 2. Jh. n. Chr. geschrieben und gliedert sich in drei Teile: Sp. 1-4,17 enthalten eine Reihe von Definitionen, die sich auf die páthē von Körper und Seele beziehen (vgl. die Diskussion bei Gal. meth. med. 1); in Sp. 4,21-20,50 finden sich unterschiedliche Ansichten über Krankheitsursachen; die Spalten 21,1-39,32 behandeln die Physiologie. Die Schrift sowie viele interne Charakteristika deut…

Antidotarium

(260 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] bezeichnet urspr. Abhandlungen über Gegengifte, z. B. Gal. de antidotis, 14,1-209 (übers. u. komm. von [1, vgl. 6]) und Philumenos (hrsg. von [2]), im ma. Lat. dagegen alle Schriften, die zusammengesetzte Arzneimittel zum Gegenstand hatten. Der genaue Zeitpunkt dieses Bedeutungswandels ist unklar, da in den meisten spätant. Arzneimittelsammlungen weder Titel noch Autoren aufgeführt sind. Der früheste Beleg des Titels findet sich erst in einem Ms. aus dem 11. Jh., der sich jedoch …

Iakobos Psychrestos

(100 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Arzt, Sohn des Hesychios von Damaskos, wechselte im frühen 6. Jh. n.Chr. den Wohnsitz, um in die Arztpraxis seines Vaters in Konstantinopel einsteigen zu können. Er behandelte Kaiser Leo und wurde comes und archiatros (Chr. pasch. 8254a; Malalas, Chronographia 370 Dindorf; Photios, Bibliotheca 344A). Als paganer Philosoph, der in Athen und Konstantinopel mit Statuen geehrt wurde, befahl er den Reichen, den Armen zu helfen, die er im übrigen ohne Honorar behandelte. Sein Spitzname leitet sich …

Lippitudo

(162 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Durch Exsudation gekennzeichnete Augenkrankheit, die eine Vielfalt spezifischer Erkrankungen wie Trachom und Konjunktivitis umfaßt. Eine trockene Variante der l., die xerophthalmía, bei der die eiternden Augen über Nacht verkleben, ist ebenfalls beschrieben (Celsus, De medicina 6,6,29). Celsus [7] (ebd. 6,6,2) berichtet von einer Vielzahl von Salben und sonstigen Mitteln gegen die l., eine ungemein verbreitete Krankheit; dies findet Bestätigung in den zahlreichen sog. “Okulistenstempeln” für Augensalben (Kollyrion) mit der Aufschrift ‘gegen l.’ sowi…

Hippokratischer Eid

(632 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London) RWG
[English version] Die Belege für einen Gebrauch des H. E. in der Spätant. sind uneindeutig. Gregor von Nazianz (or. 7,10) berichtet, sein Bruder Caesarius habe als Medizinstudent in Alexandreia den Eid nicht abgelegt, womit impliziert ist, daß andere ihn sehr wohl geschworen haben. Doch findet sich für die byz. und muslimische Welt kein Nachweis für eine offizielle Verbindlichkeit, den Schwur zu leisten, auch wenn der Eid wohlbekannt war. In der Praxis trat er hinter dem galenischen Konzept zurück…

Krinas

(78 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (Crinas) aus Marseille (Massalia), Arzt, der zu Neros Lebzeiten nach Rom kam (Plin. nat. 29,9). Er erwarb sich hohes Ansehen, als er die Astronomie mit der Medizin verband, indem er die Diätpläne für seine Patienten nach dem Lauf der Sterne ausrichtete. Als er starb, hinterließ er 10 Millionen Sesterzen, nachdem er einmal bereits die gleiche Summe aufgewandt hatte, um die Befestigungswälle und andere Anlagen in seiner Geburtsstadt wieder instandsetzen zu lassen. Nutton, Vivian (London)

Artorius, M.

(131 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Arzt und Anhänger des Asklepiades von Bithynien (Caelius Aurelius morb. acut. 3,113), war mit Octavian in Philippi, wo ein Traum dem zukünftigen Kaiser das Leben rettete (Plut. Antonius 22; Brutus 47; Val. Max. 1,7,2; Vell. 2,70,1). Er wurde, wohl anläßlich einer Reise nach Delos (IDélos 4116), von den Athenern geehrt (IG II/III2 4116) und starb um 27 v.Chr. bei einem Schiffbruch (Hieron. chron. Olymp. 127). A. glaubte, daß Tollwut das Gehirn zuerst angreife, daß sie auf den Magen übergreife und Schlucken verursache, unstillbaren…

Diätetik

(1,107 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] I. Griechenland Die griech. Medizin hebt sich von der ägypt. oder babylon. entscheidend dadurch ab, daß sie der D. im weiten Sinn einer Eß-, Trink-, Bewegungs- und Badekultur innerhalb der Therapeutik eine zentrale Stellung einräumt [2. 395-402; 3]. Urspr. bedeutete D. die Verabreichung von aufeinander abgestimmten Nahrungsmitteln in flüssiger, breiiger oder fester Form je nach Grad der Erkrankung (Hippokr. de medicina vetere 5 [4. 241-257]). Um die Mitte des 5. Jh.v.Chr. wuchs sie…

Arabische Medizin

(1,939 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London) RWG
Nutton, Vivian (London) RWG [English version] A. Grundlagen (RWG) Spätestens um 500 n.Chr. basierte die griech. Medizin auf Galen (Galenismus). Konkurrierende medizinische Theorien waren kaum mehr in Umlauf, und sogar pragmatisch orientierte Ärzte wie Alexander von Tralleis lehnten galenische Theoreme nicht vollkommen ab. In Alexandreia selbst und auch sonst im byz. Reich, wo man der alexandrinischen Trad. folgte, z.B. in Ravenna, gab es ein Curriculum, das aus galenischen Texten, den sog. 16 Büchern Summaria Alexandrinorum sowie hippokratischen Texten bestand, die in…

Diätetik

(375 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London) RWG
[English version] Klass., auf den hippokratisch-galenischen Theoremen eines Säftegleichgewichts beruhende diätetische Vorstellungen spielten bis ins 20. Jh. hinein in der Medizin eine bedeutende Rolle (Säftelehre). In der Arabischen Medizin gilt, daß alle Nahrungsmittel Kräfte enthalten, die, einmal über die Nahrung aufgenommen, die Gesundheit des Körpers zum Guten wie zum Schlechten beeinflussen können. Daher gehörte es zu den Aufgaben des Arztes, Lebensordnungen für den Gesundheits- wie für den …

Iatrosophistes

(208 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Urspr. Bezeichnung eines Lehrers der Medizin (v.a. in Alexandreia), konnte sich i. in späterer Zeit auf jeden erfahrenen Praktiker beziehen ( medicus sapientissimus, Corpus Glossatorum Latinorum 3,600,32 Goetz), sei es in der Schulmedizin (z.B. Agnellus, In Galeni De sectis commentarium 33) oder in der magischen Heilkunst (Ps.-Kallisthenes, Vita Alexandri 1,3) [1]. Entgegen der Emendierung durch v. Arnim in Dion Chrys. 33,6 dürfte der Begriff nicht vor dem späten 4. Jh. n.Chr. geprägt worden sein (Epi…

Akesias

(46 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (Ἀκεσίας). Griech. Arzt des 3. Jh. v. Chr. (?). Einem vorsätzlich zweideutigen Sprichwort zufolge behandelte er nur die, die am schlimmsten (Leiden oder Arzt) litten (Aristoph. Byz., Zenob. 1,52). Möglicherweise schrieb er auch über die Kochkunst (Athen. 12, 516c). Nutton, Vivian (London)

Penis

(170 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] (φαλλός/ phallós, lat. mentula; zu Synonyma vgl. [1]). Um 250 v.Chr. hatte man seine Anatomie (Eichel, Hodensack und Hoden) verstanden, doch tat man sich mit der Erklärung seiner Physiologie, v.a. der Erektionsfähigkeit, schwer. Galenos (de usu partium 15,3) nannte ihn ein ‘nervenähnliches Teil’ und diskutierte in De motibus dubiis die mögliche Beteiligung des Vorstellungsvermögens an der Erektion. Wenn auch die circumcisio (Beschneidung) im wesentlichen auf jüdische Kreise beschränkt blieb, wurde die Infibulation (Vers…

Eryximachos

(81 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Sohn des Akumenos, athenischer Arzt und Asklepiade, 5. Jh. v.Chr. Als Freund des Sophisten Hippias (Plat. Prot. 315A) und des Phaidros (Plat. Phaidr. 268A; symp. 177A) spielt er eine beachtliche Rolle in Platons Symposion, in dem er eine lange Rede zu Ehren des Eros hält (185E-188E). Seine leicht pedantische Art erntet bei den geladenen Gästen nicht mehr als wohlwollendes Gelächter, doch finden sich im Corpus Hippocraticum zeitgenössische Parallelen zu seiner Verknüpfung von Naturphilos. und Medizin. Nutton, Vivian (London)

Geschlechtskrankheiten

(380 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Mangels eindeutiger diagnostischer Zeugnisse fällt es schwer, die ant. Geschichte der G. zu rekonstruieren. Harmlosere Infektionen wie der Herpes genitalis (Hippokr. De mulierum affectibus 1,90 = 8,214-8 L.) und die Chlamydieninfektion [2. 220] sind gut bezeugt, die beiden großen Geschlechtskrankheiten der Moderne, Gonorrhoe und Syphilis, lassen sich jedoch nur schwer im Überlieferungsmaterial ausmachen. Gonorrhoe, eine griech. Wortschöpfung vermutlich aus hell. Zeit, bezeichnet …

Anatomie

(1,823 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] A. Ägypten und alter Orient A. im Sinne eines durch Sektionen gewonnenen, systematischen Wissens über den menschlichen Körper scheint eine griech. Erfindung zu sein. Wir wissen zwar, daß babylon. (und später auch etr.) Hepatoskopie die Entnahme einer Tierleber umfaßte, doch abgesehen von einer relativ differenzierten Terminologie für dieses Organ und von der Zuordnung bestimmter Emotionen zu den Kardinalorganen schweigen babylonische Texte zum Thema A. [17]. Anfänge anatomischer Forsc…

Euryphon von Knidos

(315 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Griech. Arzt, Mitte des 5. Jh. v.Chr. Die bei Soran. vita Hipp. 5 überlieferte Erzählung, derzufolge E. Perdikkas II. von Makedonien von einer Krankheit aufgrund unglücklicher Liebe geheilt haben soll, ist vergleichsweise spät entstanden und ziemlich phantastisch. Galen zufolge (17a,886) schuf er die wichtigsten Beiträge zu den sogenannten “Knidischen Sentenzen”, die nur in Fr. überliefert sind [1. 65-66; 2. 14-26]. Einige seiner Werke, bes. solche diätetischen Inhalts, sollen na…

Akron [aus Akragas]

(121 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Sohn eines gleichnamigen Arztes (Diog. Laert. 8,65), älterer Zeitgenosse des Hippokrates. Er soll Athen durch das Anzünden großer Feuer im Jahre 430 v. Chr. von der Pest befreit haben (Plut. Is. 80 [vgl. 1]). Den Empirikern (Ps.-Gal. 14,638) galt A. als Begründer ihrer Schule und trat als solcher in die doxographische Tradition ein [2]. Er könnte sich an Debatten über den epistemologischen Wert der Sinneswahrnehmung beteiligt haben (er war mit Empedokles bekannt). Ob Philinos und…

Ausbildung (medizinische)

(565 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] In der Ant. lernten die meisten Heilkundigen ihr Handwerk von ihren Vorfahren oder als Autodidakten, doch gingen einzelne auch bei einem Meister in die Lehre (z.B. Pap. Lond. 43, 2.Jh. v.Chr.) oder reisten zu medizinischen Hochburgen, um dort Unterricht zu nehmen. Überreste solcher A.-Zentren finden sich in Babylonien [1] und in Ägypten, wo das unter Dareios um 510 v.Chr. wieder aufgebaute “Haus des Lebens” in Sais als ein solches Schulungszentrum und Skriptorium gedient haben ma…

Agathinos

(202 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] aus Sparta (Ps.-Gal. 19,353). Griech. Arzt des 1. Jh., Schüler des Athenaios von Attaleia, Lehrer des Archigenes und des Pneumatikers Herodotos. Wenn er auch zumeist den Pneumatikern zugeordnet wurde, glaubten doch einige, er habe seine eigene, die episynthetische oder eklektische, Schule begründet. Die überlieferten Fragmente seiner Schriften lassen Verbindungen zu Empirikern und Methodikern erkennen. Er schrieb über Arzneimittel (ein Fragment über Nieswurz findet sich in Cael. …

Epilepsie

(330 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Seit 1050 v.Chr. finden sich in babylon. Texten sorgfältige Beschreibungen der E. in ihren unterschiedlichen Erscheinungsformen [1]. E. wird dort mit Göttern, Geistern oder Dämonen in Verbindung gebracht. Der Glaube an einen rel. Ursprung der E. und folglich auch ihre Behandlung durch rel., magische oder volksmedizinische Maßnahmen läßt sich die ganze Ant. hindurch und über kulturelle Grenzen hinweg verfolgen. Eine rein somatische Deutung im Sinne von Veränderungen im Säftehausha…

Säftelehre

(671 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Die Vorstellung, körperliche Gesundheit hänge mit den Körperflüssigkeiten zusammen, war weit verbreitet. Schleim findet bereits in der ant. ägypt. Medizin Erwähnung, und auch in der babylonischen Medizin richtete man auf Menge und Farbe der Körperflüssigkeiten besonderes Augenmerk. Den Griechen galten ichṓr bei den Göttern, Blut (αἵμα) bei Menschen und Saft (χυμός) der Pflanzen als Träger des Lebens. Diese Flüssigkeiten (χυμοί/ chymoí, lat. humores) konnten im Übermaß auch gefährlich werden. Zwei Säfte, Schleim (φλέγμα) und Galle (χόλος bzw…

Iatraleiptes

(102 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] Masseur, ein Beruf, der im 1. Jh. n.Chr. in Mode gekommen zu sein scheint (z.B. CIL 6,9476); doch reicht die Verknüpfung von Medizin und Gymnastik bis Herodikos [1] von Selymbria (5. Jh. v.Chr.) zurück. Trimalchio wurde von drei aliptae behandelt (Petron. 28), Plinius betrachtete diesen ganzen Zweig der Medizin als Quacksalberei (nat. 29,4-5). Vespasian hingegen garantierte allen, die diese Kunst ausübten, diverse Privilegien (FIRA 1,77), und Plinius d.J. gelang es, Traian zu veranlassen, seinem ägypt. i. Harpocrates, dem er die Heilung von einer erns…

Ionicus

(79 words)

Author(s): Nutton, Vivian (London)
[English version] von Sardes. Lehrer und Arzt, wirkte um 390 n.Chr. Als Sohn eines Arztes und Schüler von Zenon von Zypern stand er in hohem Ansehen, v.a. wegen seiner Verdienste in der praktischen Therapie, Drogenkunde, Bandagierungskunst und Chirurgie. Er war auch Philosoph mit besonderen Fähigkeiten sowohl in medizinischer Prognostik als auch in Wahrsagerei (Eunapius, Vitae philosophorum 499). Zudem soll er als bekannter Redner und Dichter hervorgetreten sein, auch wenn keines seiner Werke überl. ist. Nutton, Vivian (London)
▲   Back to top   ▲