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Lemovii

(79 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] Tribe on the Baltic Sea between the Oder and the Vistula (Tac. Germ. 44,1), neighbouring the Rugii. The version of the name is uncertain, and identification with other tribal names, passed down to us, for instance in Ptolemy, is hypothetical. Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliography A. Franke, s.v. L., RE Suppl. 5, 549 G. Perl, in: J. Herrmann (ed.), Griech. und lat. Quellen zur Frühgesch. Mitteleuropas bis zur Mitte des 1. Jt. u.Z., Teil 2, 1990, 249.

Icorigium

(159 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Batavian Revolt Roman road-station (It. Ant. 373,1: Egorigio; Tab. Peut. 3,1) where the Trier - Cologne road crossed the Kyll, modern Jünkerath. From the 1st cent. AD long-houses were built close to each other on both sides of the road, with the narrow side facing the street. Destroyed during the German invasions of the 3rd cent., protected in the late Constantinian period by a circular fortification (135 m diameter) with 13 round towers and two gateh…

Ubii

(479 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] Germanic tribe (Caes. B Gall. 4,3,3; Tac. Germ. 28,4; Tac. Hist. 4,28,1; 4,64), settled in Caesar's time on the right bank of the Rhine (Rhenus [2]) between the lower La(u)gona (modern Lahn) and Taunus. Displaced by the Suebi, the U. allied with Caesar in 55 BC (Caes. B Gall. 4,8,3; 16,5-8). Caesar's Rhine crossings in 55 and 53 BC probably took place from the Neuwieder Becken in the territory of the U. The history and chronology of their resettlement on the left bank of the Rhine…

Nuit(h)ones

(82 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] The Nuit(h)ones were among the tribes worshipping the goddess Nerthus (Tac. Germ. 40,2); they are believed to have lived in Holstein and western Mecklenburg [1. 218; 2. 460-465]. The suggestion by [3] that Nuit(h)ones be read as Teutones is not convincing. Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliography 1 A. Lund (ed.), P. Cornelius Tacitus: Germania, 1988 2 D. Timpe, Tacitus' Germania als religionsgeschichtliche Quelle, in: Germanische Religionsgeschichte (suppl. vol. RGA 5), 1992, 434-485 3 A. Genrich, Der Siedlungsraum der Nerthusstämme, in: Die Kunde…

Mattiaci

(416 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] A tribe that settled in Wetterau and Taunus during the Imperial period. The Celtic name is associated with Mattium, the main city of the Chatti (cf. Ptol. 2,11,14: Ματτικόν; Mattikón). It is debated whether the M. were a sub-tribe of the Germanic Chatti which had already separated from them during the Augustan period, and settled in the above-mentioned area with Roman permission (for earlier research, cf. [1; 2. 52-57; 3]), or whether the M. are those mentioned as having defected because of the destruction of…

Tencteri

(191 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] Germanic tribe, driven in 58 BC from their homeland to the east of the Rhine by the Suebi. After three years as nomads, in 55 BC the T. crossed the Rhine (Rhenus [2]), defeated the west-bank Menapii, who had refused to accept them into their territory, and migrated up the Meuse (Mosa [1]) as far as the Eburones and the Condrusi. There, Caesar annihilated them; only some of the cavalry escaped to the Sugambri to the east of the Rhine (Caes. B Gall. 4,1,1-4,18,5). In 17/16 BC they, …

Rhenus

(1,104 words)

Author(s): Uggeri, Giovanni (Florence) | Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] [1] River in upper-Italy, present-day Reno in Emilia-Romagna River in Upper Italy, present-day Reno in Emilia-Romagna, right-hand feeding river of the Padus (Po), which rises in the Apennines above Pistoriae (Pistoia) and flows past Marzabotto through the region of Felsina (Bononia [1]). In Etruscan times it flowed into the Padus near Voghiera to the southeast of Ferrara, in Roman times somewhat more to the west. Nowadays it flows via an artificial canal directly into the Adriatic Sea. In…

Rigomagus

(288 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) | Graßl, Herbert (Salzburg) | Sartori, Antonio (Milan)
[German version] [1] Roman fort in Germania Inferior Roman fort in Germania Inferior (Germani [1] II.) on the road from Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne) to Confluentes [1] (Koblenz), modern Remagen. At least from the Claudian era a wood and earth fort existed; from the Flavian era, a stone fort stood in the same place. Numerous stone inscriptions are extant. R. was a beneficiarii station from the 2nd half of the 2nd to the middle of the 3rd cents. AD. A hoard of coins from AD 270/280 (274/5?) has been connected with the occupation of …

Sumelocenna

(229 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre Celtic settlement on the Nicer/Neckar (Tab. Peut. 4,1; [1. 199-271, 693 f.], cf. [3. 357-382]), modern Rottenburg. Settled in the Roman period, probably after AD 90 [3. 399-402]; there is no evidence of a fort [2. 469 f. D 89], but there is evidence of an ala Vallensium (CIL XIII 6361). Inscriptions attest to a procurator (administrator of the imperial saltus S., ILS 8855, probably at the beginning of the 2nd cent. AD), an ordo and magistri of the saltus (ILS 7100, middle of the 2nd cent.). S. was in the periphery of a civi…

Saltus Teutoburgiensis

(401 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] The only reference to the ‘Teutoburg Forest’ in ancient sources is Tac. Ann. 1,60,3, mentioning it as the scene of Varus' battle in AD 9 (P. Quinctilius [II 7]; Arminius). On his foray into Germania east of the Rhine in AD 15, Germanicus [2] entered the region between Amisia and Lupia, “... haud procul Teutoburgiensi saltu, in quo reliquiae Vari legionumque insepultae dicebantur” (“not far from the forest of Teutoburg, in which the remains of Varus and the legions were said to lie unburied”). The battle site was then reconnoitred and the fallen buried. In the absence of c…

Suebi

(624 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] The Suebi, an association of Germanic tribes or groups of Germanic peoples, numerous and strong (Str. 4,3,4; 7,1,3), between the Rhenus [2] (Rhine), Istrus [2] (Danube), Albis (Elbe) and as far as the Mare Suebicum (Baltic Sea) area. The nucleus of their territory was Lusatia, later Saxony and Thuringia. Although first recorded in the 1st century BC (Caes. Gall. 1,37,3 f.;  cf. Tac. Germ. 2,2), their name had been coined by the 2nd century BC. The S. included e.g. the Marcomanni, …

Tarodunum

(145 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Oppidum (Ταρόδουνον; Taródounon). Celtic township at the end of the Höllental valley (Ptol. 2,11,30), modern Zarten in the Black Forest. There is evidence of a fortified site (approximately 200 ha) with murus Gallicus (scarcely traces of settlement), with a 2nd/1st century BC settlement area outside it (approximately 12-16 ha) (Celtic coins, products of gold smelting, a planchet, amphora sherds, a glass bracelet, ring beads). Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliography F. Fischer, Beiträge zur Kenntnis von T., i…

Nida

(364 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre Roman vicus, modern Frankfurt am Main-Heddernheim in Germany. Beginning with the Flavian period (2nd half of 1st cent. AD) there is evidence for at least 10 camps between Heddernheim and the adjoining Praunheim. Evidence of longer-term activity is only found in a cavalry fort (5 ha in size) which was constructed in the early Flavian period in timber and earth and then extended in stone towards the end of the 1st cent. It was presumably occupied by the ala I Flavia Gemina. There is also epigraphical evidence of the cohors IV…

Rigodulum

(115 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Batavian Revolt Town located on the right shore of the Mosella, present-day Riol; its name is Celtic. In AD 70, during the Batavian Revolt, it was the location of the battle between the entrenched Treveri under Iulius [II 43] Civilis and the Romans who had been brought there from Mogontiacum (Mainz) by Petilius [II 1] Cerialis. During this battle, the most prominent of the Belgae were taken prisoner by the Romans (cf. Tac. Hist. 4,71,4 f.). Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliography J. Keune, s. v. R., RE 1 A, 803 f.  H. Heubner, P. Co…

Mons Melibocus

(91 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Μηλίβοκον ὄρος/ Mēlíbokon όros). According to Ptol. (2,11,7), the most northerly and important mountain range in Germania, which stretched over several degrees of longitude; the southern frontier of the Cherusci and the Chamavi. Its precise identification is disputed. Recently the Thuringian Forest and the Erzgebirge mountains have been put forwards. Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliography A. Franke, s.v. Melibocus mons, RE 15, 509  G.Chr. Hansen, in: J. Herrmann (ed.), Griechische und lateinische Quellen zur Frühgeschichte Mitteleuropas bis z…

Colonia Ulpia Traiana

(399 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: | Coloniae Roman colony on the left side of the Lower Rhine, modern Xanten, on a low terrace between two Rhine branches in an area only suited to a limited extent for cultivation. While early signs of settlement from the 4th or 3rd cents. BC indicate no continuity with the Roman period, a favoured central location of the  Cugerni already arose there at the turn of the millennium because of the proximity of the legion camp of  Vetera. According to Tac. Hist. 4,22,1, the settlement was set up in the 60s of the 1st cent. AD ‘in the style of a   mu…

Laciburgium

(62 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Λακιβούργιον; Lakiboúrgion). Site in northern Germania magna, west of the Oder (Ptol. 2,11,12), not yet localized. Possibly a misspelling of Asciburgium (modern Moers-Asberg). Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliography A. Franke, s.v. L., RE 12, 344f. G. Chr. Hansen, in: J. Herrmann (ed.), Griech. und lat. Quellen zur Frühgesch. Mitteleuropas bis zur Mitte des 1. Jt. u.Z., Teil 3, 1991, 581.

Tolbiacum

(140 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] (modern Zülpich, district of Euskirchen in North Rhine-Westphalia). Town ( vicus: CIL XIII 7920;  It. Ant. 373,4: vicus Sopenorum - possibly a Celtic tribal name), originally in the settlement area of the Eburones, then of the Ubii (Tac. Hist. 4,79,2). Presumably the location of a station of beneficiarii . Remains survive of thermae and burial monuments. After being destroyed in Germanic attacks in 275/6 AD, T. was fortified at the beginning of the 4th cent. AD . There is evidence of Romanic settlement until the middle of the 5th cent. Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliogr…

Taunus

(302 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] One of the highest mountain ranges in Germania (Mela 3,30; name possibly Celtic). In AD 15 Germanicus [2] had a fort built in monte Tauno on the ruins of a fortress designed by Claudius [II 24] Drusus (Tac. Ann. 1,56,1). This fortress has often been identified with a fort established by Drusus 'among the Chatti immediately on the Rhine' in 11 BC (Cass. Dio 54,33,4). Since the latter is now presumed rather to be in the area of the Neuwieder Basin, the identification of Drusus' two fortresses is as uncertain as the connection with Ἄρταυνον/ Ártaunon in Ptol. 2,11,29. The T…

Vetera

(975 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: | Gallia/Gaul | Legio | Legio | Limes | Limes | Batavian Revolt Roman camp on the Rhine at the 60th milestone downstream from Colonia Agrippinensis (modern Cologne; Tac. Ann. 1,45,1) between the modern towns of Birten and Xanten. The camp originated from the early Imperial period. The name, probably indigenous, refers to an archaeologically unattested earlier settlement nearby (cf. Tac. Hist. 4,18,3: castra quibus Veterum nomen est, 'camp with the name V.', quite often in accounts of the Batavian Revolt; Ptol.…
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