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Wiseman, Nicholas Patrick Stephen

(186 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Aug 2, 1802, Seville – Feb 15, 1865, London), cardinal archbishop of Westminster. Born in Spain, son of Irish parents, he was ¶ raised in Ireland and England. He attended Unshaw College, Durham, before studying at the English College in Rome (D.D. 1824). After his ordination in 1825, he rose quickly through a succession of appointments, including rector of the English College in Rome (1828), coadjutor to Bishop Walsh, vicar-apostolic and president of St. Mary’s College, Oscott (1840). After the reestab…

Marsh, Herbert

(160 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Dec 10, 1757, Faversham, England – May 1, 1839, Peterborough, England), Anglican theologian and bishop. Educated at Cambridge, in 1779 he became a fellow of St. John's College. While studying in Germany under J.D. Michaelis, he was exposed to the new biblical scholarship, later translating Michaelis's Introduction to the New Testament. In 1807 Marsh was appointed Lady Margaret Professor at Cambridge. With his enthusiastically received lectures on biblical criticism (1809–1816), he was among the first to popularize the new German…

Simeon, Charles

(169 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Sep 24, 1759, Reading, Berkshire – Nov 13, 1836, Cambridge, UK), English evangelical clergyman. In 1782 he was made a fellow of King’s College, Cambridge, and, in the following year, appointed vicar of Holy Trinity Church. Despite initial opposition, Simeon persevered, eventually becoming one of the most influential figures in the Church of England. His rise to prominence was due to a combination of influences, including his innovative parish ministry, his skill in nurturing seve…

Underhill, Evelyn

(160 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Dec 6, 1875, Wolverhampton – Jun 15, 1941, London), author of spiritual works. Educated at King’s College, London, in 1907 she experienced a religious conversion of a mystical nature. Her early spiritual views were described in her first book, Mysticism (1911, Mysticism). Before long she met Friedrich v. Hügel, who would later become her spiritual director. Under his influence, her interest in historical Christianity developed so that she abandoned her mystical, intellectual, Neo-Platonist views in favor of a more pra…

Tait, Archibald Campbell

(167 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Dec 21, 1811, Edinburgh – Dec 3, 1882, Episcopal Place at Addington), archbishop of Canterbury. Educated at Edinburgh and Oxford, Tait converted to the Church of England in 1830. Three years later, he was appointed tutor at Balliol College, Oxford. Though sympathetic to the aims of the Oxford Movement, in 1841 he joined in the public protest against Tract 90 (J.H. Newman). Talented and widely admired, Tait quickly advanced through a succession of clerical appointments, including headmaster of Rugby (1842, succeeding T. Arnold); bishop of…

Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts (SPG)

(277 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] The SPG was established under royal charter by T. Bray in 1701 to supply the “want of learned and orthodox ministers” in the plantations, colonies, and “factories beyond the seas.” The rapidly expanding British Empire presented both challenges and opportunities for the Church of England. The SPG set out to “settle the State of Religion” for the colo­nists before undertaking “the conversion of the Natives.” During the 18th century the SPG’s efforts focused on the American colonies,…

Thornton, Henry

(131 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Mar 10, 1760, London – Jan 16, 1815, Kensington Gore), philanthropist, banker, member of parliament, and abolitionist (Abolitionism). Younger son of the wealthy evangelical merchant John Thornton, he worked in banking before being elected member of parliament in 1782. His writings on economic affairs were much admired. In Parliament he was active in humanitarian affairs and, as a member of the celebrated Clapham Sect, joined with W. Wilberforce in advancing the abolitionist cause…

Moody, Dwight Lyman

(292 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Feb 5, 1837, Northfield, MA – Dec 22, 1899, Northfield, MA), evangelist. Moody left his birthplace in New England and went to Chicago, where he gave up a promising career in the shoe business to work as a minister (esp. with the YMCA [Young Men's Christian Association: II]). During the Civil War he converted wounded soldiers; thereafter he returned to Chicago, where he organized conferences for Sunday School teachers. There he met I.D. Sankey, whose music contributed greatly to t…

Stillingfleet, Edward

(94 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Apr 17, 1635, Cranborne, Dorset – Mar 27, 1699, Westminster), Latitudinarian theologian and antiquary. After becoming a fellow of St. John’s College, Cambridge, in 1653, he published a series of works, including his Irenicum (1659), Origines Sacrae (1662), and Rational Account (1664), which established his reputation as a theologian and brought rapid preferment. He then became, in succession, archdeacon of London, dean of St. Paul’s, and bishop of Worcester. Grayson Carter Bibliography Works: The Works, ed. R. Bentley, 6 vols., 1709/1710 On Stillingfleet: W. …

Liddon, Henry Parry

(182 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Aug 20, 1829, North Stoneham, Hampshire – Sep 9, 1890, Weston-super-Mare, Gloucestershire) was an Anglican cleric. Educated at Oxford, he was ordained in 1852. After a succession of church appointments, he became, in 1870, a canon of St. Paul's Cathedral in London, where his able preaching attracted sizable congregations. A leader of the catholic revival (Oxford Movement), Liddon opposed the advance of both its ritualist and liberal-Catholic wings; the publication of Lux Mundi (1889) proved particularly distressing as well as the growing use of criti…

Seabury, Samuel

(110 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Nov 30, 1729, Groton, CT – Feb 25, 1796, New London, CT). After ordination in the Church of England (1753), Seabury served as a missionary in several American parishes. During the American Revolution (North America: I, 2), he remained a Loyalist. Nominated the first bishop in the Protestant Episcopal Church, he was consecrated in Aberdeen in 1784 by bishops of the Scottish Episcopal Church. He then became rector of St. James’ parish church, New London, bishop of Connecticut, and (1790) bishop of Rhode Island. Grayson Carter Bibliography E.E. Beardsley, Life and Corre…

James I

(169 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson R.
[German Version] (Stuart, of England; Jun 19, 1566, Edinburgh – Mar 27, 1625, London). In 1603, on the death of Elizabeth I, James VI of Scotland was crowned King James I of England. Opposed to Presbyterianism and the Church of Scotland 's political influence he attempted to impose episcopacy in Scotland. In England, James's ecclesiastical policies met with mixed success. At the Hampton Court Conference (1604) he exhibited considerable theological knowledge and authorized a new translation of the …

Dissolution of the Monasteries Act

(275 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] As the result of moral, economic, political and religious factors, Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries in England and Wales in the 1530s. Assisted by T. Cromwell, the process continued intermittently. In 1536, Parliament passed an act – the co-called “Dissolution of the Monasteries Act” – that led to the closure of around 250 of the smaller houses of the orders (roughly a third of the …

Paley, William

(318 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Jul, 1743, Peterborough, UK – May 25, 1805, Lincoln, UK), Anglican theologian, who was educated by his father and then studied at Cambridge before being elected Fellow of Christ’s College there in 1766. In his first book The Principles of Moral and Political Philosophy (1785), which later became a favorite educational resource, Paley outlined a system of utilitarian ethics (Utilitarianism; see also England, Theology in) in which he anticipated many of the themes of his contemporary, J. Bentham). Paley proved great originality in his Horae Paulinae (1790) in which…

Maurice, Frederick Denison

(363 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Aug 29, 1805, Normanston, Suffolk, England – Apr 1, 1872, Cambridge, England), Anglican theologian. Raised as a Unitarian (Unitarians/Universalists), Maurice first studied law at Cambridge and, after leaving without taking a degree, he studied theology at Oxford. He was ordained in the Church of England in 1834. After serving in a parish and as chaplain at Guy's Hospital, London, he was elected professor of English literature and history at King's College, London. Six years later…

Toplady, Augustus Montague

(103 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Nov 4, 1740, Farnham, Surrey – Aug 12, 1778, London), Anglican priest and hymn-writer. Though occupying a number of pulpits in the Church of England, Toplady remained mostly in London where he preached and, as a staunch Calvinist, engaged in spirited controversy with the Arminian J. Wesley, among others. He is chiefly remembered as the author of the hymn “Rock of Ages” (c. 1775). Grayson Carter Bibliography Works, ed. W. Row, 1794 On Toplady: T. Wright, The Life of Augustus M. Toplady, 1911 G. Lawton, Within the Rock of Ages, 1983 A. Pollard, Oxford DNB LV, 2004, 37–39.

Spencer, John

(171 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (1630, Bocton, Kent, England, baptized Oct 31, 1630 – May 27, 1693, probably Cambridge, England), English theologian and Hebraist. He ¶ served as fellow (1655) and master (1667) of Corpus Christi College, in Cambridge, before being appointed dean of Ely (1677). His most influential work, De Legibus Hebraeorum (1685), traced the religious antiquities of the ancient Hebrews and laid the foundation for the subsequent emergence of the study of comparative religion. He was the first scholar to observe the similarities between Hebre…

Chapel of Ease

(277 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson | Tiling, Peter v.
[German Version] I. History – II. Legal Status of Daughter Parishes I. History In the Western church, from the 12th century on separate chapels were established for preaching and administration of the sacraments. They were meant for those who lived in villages far from the parish church or those who could not (afford to) rent a pew. They were also an effective means of extending the church's outreach where it was difficult (or impossible) to establish new parishes. Often found in …

Gunpowder Plot

(194 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] On Mar 25, 1605, a small band of Catholics hired a cellar under the Houses of Parliament ¶ in London, storing gunpowder there. Although Guy Fawkes (1570–1606) was not their leader, he became the most famous member of the group. Their aim was to blow up the Houses of Parliament on Nov 5, 1605 – the day Parliament opened – and, at the same time, murder the attending king James I and the members of Parliament, in the hope that this would encourage Catholics to seize control of the government. William …

Pearson, John

(172 words)

Author(s): Carter, Grayson
[German Version] (Feb 28, 1613, Great Snoring, Norfolk – Jul 16, 1686, Chester), Anglican theologian and bishop. Educated at Eton and at Queens’ and King’s Colleges, Cambridge, he was ordained in 1639, but had little experience of parish ministry. As a result of his support of the Royalist cause in the Civil War, he was deprived of his appointments; he lived quietly in London during the Commonwealth (O. Cromwell). At the Restoration, he was appointed to a quick succession of Cambridge honors, incl…
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