Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)" )' returned 167 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Archiereus

(279 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] [1] Greek see  Priests Ego, Beate (Osnabrück) [German version] [2] Jewish Already during the pre-Maccabean period, the High Priest (Hebr. kohen ha-gadol; Greek archiereus) was the highest religious and political authority (cf. Sir 50,1 ff.), heading a hierarchically structured priesthood comprising several thousand individuals. Holding the status of ‘eternal holiness’ (mNaz 7,1), it was his responsibility to preserve certain rules of purity with regard to marriage and dealings with the dead. During the …

Sammai, Shammai

(150 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] ( c. 50 BC-AD 30). Significant representative of Pharisaic Judaism (Pharisaei). Š. figures in the traditional rabbinical chain from the revelation of the Torah of Moses (Pentateuch) to the 'Five Pairs' ( zugot; cf. mAvot 1,15); his counterpart is Hillel, to whom Š. is opposed in a cliché fashion in rabbinical literature: in questions of law, whereas Hillel made rather lenient decisions, Š. is characterized by strictness and rigour (cf. bShab 31a). Rabbinical tradition sees Š. as the founder of a school of scholars (Hebrew bēt-Šammai) that is likewise contrasted wi…

Seraph(im)

(187 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Hebrew sārāf, plural serāfîm, from the verb srf, 'burn'; Greek σεραφιν/ seraphin, Latin seraphin). Old Testament term for the cobra (cf. Egyptian Uraeus). Apart from the natural threat from this animal (Dtn 8,15; Nm 21,9) an apotropaic aspect plays a particular role in the Old Testament tradition: a seraph attached to a pole repels a plague of snakes in the Israelites' camp (Nm 21,7-10) {{6-9 in AV, but not saying this}}. Finds of numerous seals, primarily from the 8th century BC, indicate th…

Kerub

(322 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Hebrew ‎‏בורכ‏‎, from Akkadian karābu, ‘to dedicate, to greet’; pl. kerubs or cherubs/ kerubim). Composite creature with a human head, body of a lion and wings symbolizing the highest power. According to Gn 3:24, kerubim served to guard the garden of Eden (cf. also Ez 28:14 and 16). Particular significance is attached to the kerubim in the Biblical tradition of the arrangement of the Temple of Solomon. In the holy of holies there are two kerubim made of olive wood and plated with gold, each 10 cubits in height. With their wings with a span each of 5 cub…

Sammael

(188 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Hebrew Sammāel). Negative angel figure in Jewish tradition, often identified with Satan. S. is mentioned for the first time in Ethiopic Henoch 6, where he is one of a group of angels that rebels against God (cf. the name Σαμμανή/ Sammanḗ or Σαμιήλ/ Samiḗl in the Greek version). According to Greek Baruch 4,9, he planted the vine that led to the fall of Adam; S. was therefore cursed and became Satan. In the 'Ascension of Isaiah', S. is identified with the figure of Beliar (4,11). Rabbinical literature represents S. in the s…

Talmud

(142 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] ('study, learning', from Hebrew lamad, 'learn'). The central work within rabbinical literature, consisting of a) the Mishnah, the oldest authoritative collections of laws of rabbinical Judaism ( c. AD 200) and b) the Gemara, i.e. interpretations of and discussions on the material of the Mishnah. Since in the rabbinical period there were two centres of Jewish scholarship, i.e. Palestine and Babylonia (Sura, Pumbedita), two different Talmudim came into being: the Palestinian (= Jerusalem Talmud; essentially finalized c. AD 450) and the Babylonian (essentiall…

Esther

(340 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Ester). The Hebrew Book of Esther, dated to either the end of the Persian or the beginning of the Hellenistic period, recounts (a) the decision that the Persian King Ahasverus (485-465 BC) is said to have taken (cf. especially 3,13), at the urging of the anti-Jewish Haman, one of his most influential officials, to eliminate his kingdom's Jews, and (b) the salvation of the Jews, in which a major part was played by the Jewish E., who had entered the court without being recognized, …

Pumbedita

(140 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Hebrew pwmbdyt). Babylonian (Babylonia) city on the Euphrates. According to rabbinical tradition, it was distinguished by the fertile land around it (cf. bPes 88a), and because of its flax production, it represented an important site for the textile industry (bGit 27a; bBM 18b). The epistle of Rav Šerira Gaon indicates a centre for studying the Torah (Pentateuch) there by the time of the Second Temple (520 BC - AD 70). The destruction of Nehardea by the Palmyrans (Palmyra) in AD…

Adam

(322 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] The early Jewish and rabbinic traditions of A., the first man whom God created from the dust of the Earth (Hebr. adama) and gave the breath of life (see the Yahwistic account of creation), mainly revolved around the original sin. Early Jewish writing emphasized A.'s original glory (Wisdom 10,1 f.; Sir 49,16; 4 Ezra 6,53 f.) and beauty (Op 136-142; 145-150; Virt 203-205), occasionally even describing him as an angel (slHen 30,11 f.). However, his sin brought death to his descendants (4 Ezra 3,7,21; 7,…

Adversus Iudaeos

(242 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] Title of several patristic treatises that discuss Christianity's relationship to Judaism in apologetic terms ( Tertullianus,  Cyprianus,  Iohannes Chrysostomos,  Augustine) and other works of similar content ( Epistle of Barnabas, the Epistle to  Diognetus,  Justinus' Dialogue, the Passa Homily of  Melito etc.). Instruction within Christianity and religious teaching that attempted to legitimize the content of the Christian faith in the presence of Judaism (which was considered a p…

Pentateuch

(576 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (ἡ Πεντάτευχος sc. βίβλος/ hē Pentáteuchos sc. bíblos, literally 'book of five scrolls', Orig. comm. in Jo 4,25; cf. Hippolytus 193 Lagarde; Latin Pentateuchus, Tert. in Isid. orig. 6,2,2). In the Christian tradition, a collective term for the the books Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy at the beginning of the Hebrew Bible. The Jewish tradition, however, refers instead to the spr htwrh, 'book of instruction' (cf. also the NT term νόμος/ nómos, Luke 10:26, or νόμος Μωϋσέως/ n. Mōÿséōs, Acts 28:23) or to ḥmyšh ḥwmšy twrh (literally 'five-fifths of t…

Hekhalot literature

(365 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] Hekhalot literature (HL), to which belong, as the most important types, Hekaloth Rabbati (‘the great palaces’), Hekaloth zuṭarti (‘the small palaces’), Maʿase Merkabah (‘the work of the throne chariot’), Merkabah Rabbah (‘the great throne chariot’), Reʾuyyot Yeḥeqkel (‘the visions of Ezechiel’), Massekhet Hekaloth (‘treatise of the palaces’) and the 3rd Henoch, is a testimony to early Jewish mysticism constituted by an ‘experimental knowledge of God won through lively experience’ [4. 4]. One of the most significant motifs…

Jabne

(183 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Ἰάμνια; Iámnia). City, situated south of modern Tel Aviv. After the destruction of the Temple of Jerusalem in AD 70, it became the new centre in which Judaism reconstituted itself as rabbinic Judaism, initially under Rabbi Jochanan ben Zakkai and later under Gamaliel [2] II. A first formulation of the material which was later to be incorporated into the Mišna was undertaken here, whereby the aspect of an ordering of the religious life without temple cult and priests, as well as th…

Baruch

(193 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] According to Biblical tradition, he was Jeremiah's companion and scribe. A highly significant figure in early Jewish tradition. In the apocryphal Book of B., he appears foremost as a preacher who calls Israel to penance but also promises consolation. In the B. writings (for instance in SyrBar and GrBar, Ethiop. B. apocalypse), B. predominantly acts as a prophetic recipient of revelation, who can even be superior to Jeremiah when telling him about God's decision (SyrBar 10,1ff). B.…

Circumcisio

(346 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] Circumcision (Hebrew mûla, mîla; Greek περιτομή; peritomḗ; Latin circumcisio), the removal of the foreskin of the male member, was originally an apotropaic rite widespread amongst western Semitic peoples that was performed at the onset of puberty or prior to the wedding (cf. Exodus 4,26 Is. 9,24f; Jos. 5,4-9; Hdt. 2,104,1-3). As this custom was not known in Mesopotamia, circumcision became a distinguishing feature between the exiled people and the Babylonians during the time of Babylonian…

Exilarch

(195 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] The Exilarch (Aramaic rēš alūṯā, ‘Head of the diaspora’) was the leader of the Babylonian Jews and the official representative at the court of the Parthian king in the Talmudic and Gaonic periods ( c. 3rd-10th cents. AD). This institution, which claimed its origins in the House of David, was probably introduced during the administrative reforms of Vologaeses. I. (AD 51-79) [3]. The first certain details about the office date from the 3rd cent. (cf. yKil 9,4ff [32b]). The Exilarch had authority primarily in juridic…

Saboraeans

(71 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (from Hebrew śābar, 'consider', 'verify', 'reason' ). Term for those Jewish Talmud scholars of the 6th/7th cents. AD who carried out the final editing of the Babylonian Talmud (Rabbinical literature) and copiously amplified it with more extensive chapters. The Saboraeans followed the Tannaites (late 1st - early 3rd cents. AD) and the Amoraim (3rd-5th cents. AD). Ego, Beate (Osnabrück) Bibliography G. Stemberger, Einleitung in Talmud und Midrasch, 81992, 205-207.

Adonai

(107 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] Literally: ‘my Lords’. The plural suffix presumably recurs as an adjustment to the Hebrew word for God, Elohim, which is grammatically a plural form. When early Judaism tabooed the divine name Yahweh for fear of an abuse of its utterance (cf. i.a. Ex 20.7), adonai became a substitute. Thus, the Septuagint expresses the name ‘Yahweh’ as the divine predicate ‘Lord’ (κύριος; kýrios). The  Masoretes ( c. 7th-9th cents. AD), who initially set the text of the Hebrew Bible which only consisted of consonants and supplied its vowels, vocalized the tetra…

Noah

(340 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Νῶε/ Nôe, Lat. Noa, Noe; Hebr. Nōaḥ). In the Bible, Noah is the main character in the story of the Flood in Gn 6,5-9,29. This story originated in Mesopotamia (cf. the Gilgamesh Epic and the Atraḫasis Epic; legend of the Flood). As a righteous man Noah is spared God's punishment and thus he became the father of mankind, as father of Shem, Ham und Japheth (Gn 6,10; 9,18), who represent the three continents. According to the traditional interpretation of the Pentateuch, the Biblical story…

Theodotion

(133 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Θεωδοτίων/ Theodotíōn; according to Epiphanius, De mensuris et ponderibus 17; 2nd cent. AD), in the view of the ancient Church a proselyte from Ephesus (Iren. Adversus haereses 3,21). T. did not produce (in contrast to Aquila [3] and Symmachus [2]) a new Greek translation of the Old Testament, rather he revised a Greek translation in accordance with the Hebrew text. Whether his model was identical with the Septuaginta is debatable, since there are also 'Theodotionic' readings in texts earlier than T. [1] identified T. with the author of the k aige- or Palestinian rece…

Rabbinical literature

(1,703 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] I. Definition Collective term for the literature of rabbinical Judaism (AD 70 to 1040), traditionally considered the 'oral Torah' ( tōrā šæ-be-al-pæ) revealed to Moses [1] on Mount Sinai (mAb 1,1). In terms of content, a distinction is made between Halakhah, i.e. the legal-judicial tradition, and Haggadah, which contains narrative elements. The essential literary works of this transmitted corpus are the Mishnah, Tosefta, Talmud, various Midrash works and the Targumim (Targum). RL is not the work of i…

Šekinā

(271 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (literally the 'inhabitation [of God]' from Hebrew šāḵan, 'dwell, inhabit'). Rabbinical term for the presence of God in the world; follows notionally from the description of God's dwelling in the Temple (Jes 8,18; Ez 43,7-9) or in his people (Ex 29,45) (cf. also the comparable reception of the concept in John's theology of incarnation, Jo 1,14). The concept of Šekinā is used to describe the immanence of an intrinsically transcendental deity. Proceeding from the idea of the continuous presence of the Šekinā in the Temple (according to [1] …

Nehardea

(122 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] City on the Euphrates in Babylonia which, even before the destruction of the temple in Jerusalem in AD 70, showed a Jewish settlement (Jos. Ant. Iud. 18,311). According to rabbinical tradition, an important Talmud school (Judaic law) was situated there as well as the headquarters of the Babylonian exilarchs (Exilarch). The city's heyday was in the middle of the 3rd cent. After it had been destroyed by the Palmyrenes in AD 259 - probably in order to break its economic strength - the centre of Babylonian Judaism moved to Pumbedita. Ego, Beate (Osnabrück) Bibliography Y.D. Gi…

Pesah

(491 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Hebrew psḥ; Greek πάσχα, LXX, explained in Phil. De sacrificiis Abelis et Caini 63 and Phil. Legum allegoria 3 as διάβασις/ diábasis; German Passah; English Passover). Annual spring celebration from 15 to 22 Nisan according to the Jewish calendar. It is one of the most important Jewish festivals and commemorates the Exodus and the deliverance of the Israelites from Egypt (cf. Ex 7-14). A central symbol is unleavened bread (Hebrew maṣṣōt), which is supposed to recall the haste of the Exodus (Ex 12:34; 14:39). Hence any leavened bread has to be remov…

Aaron

(228 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] Post-Biblical traditions of A. are designed to idealize this figure, who appears ambivalent in the Biblical tradition (e.g. the Golden Calf episode), against a background of disputes starting with  Menelaus over the office of High Priest, which had abandoned hereditary succession, and thus affirming that A. (and his successors) were worthy of the office. The  Qumran community, which broke with the Jerusalem community of worship in protest over the progressive desacralization of th…

Nazirite, Nazir

(226 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] According to biblical records (Nm 6:1-21), a male or female (cf. Jos. BI 2,313: Berenice) nazirite vowed - normally for a limited period of time - to take up certain ascetic rules of behaviour: abstention from vine products and haircutting, ban on getting impure by touching a dead person (Nm 6:3-12; cf. also the rules in the Mishnah, or Talmud and Tosefta tract Nazir). If the nazirite vow was not, as in the case of Samson (Judges 13,5), taken for life, then it ended, after the deadline set in the vow, with offers of various sacrifices (cf. Ac…

Jezira, Sefer ha-

(259 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[German version] (Hebrew ‘Book of creation’). Attempt at a systematic description of the fundamental principles of the world order. This Hebrew text, comprising only a few pages and extant in three different recensions, was probably written between the 3rd and 6th cent. and thus is one of the oldest texts of Jewish esoteric writing. In the first part, the ten original numbers, and in the second part the twenty-two letters of the Hebrew alphabet are presented as elements of creation through whose c…

Adonai

(101 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] wörtlich “meine Herren”. Das Pluralsuffix rekurriert vermutlich auf eine Angleichung an das hebr. Wort für Gott, Elohim, das gramm. eine Pluralform ist. Als das Frühjudentum aus Furcht vor Mißbrauch die Aussprache des Gottesnamens Jahwe tabuisierte (vgl. u. a. Ex 20,7), diente A. als Ersatz. Die Septuaginta gibt dementsprechend den Eigennamen “Jahwe” durch das Gottesprädikat “Herr” (κύριος), wieder. Die Masoreten (ca. 7.-9. Jh. n. Chr.), die den zunächst fast nur aus Konsonanten bestehenden Text der hebr. Bibel fixierte…

Magog

(210 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] In Ez 38,2 ist M. der Name des Landes des Großfürsten Gog, den Gott zusammen mit seiner Heeresmacht gegen Israel heranziehen läßt, um dieses zu überfallen; dabei wird er aber umkommen (zum Text Ez 38,1-39,29 und seinen einzelnen Schichtungen vgl. [1]; s. auch Gn 10,2, wo M. zu den Söhnen Jafets gezählt wird). Es wurde erwogen, ob Gog mit einer histor. Gestalt wie z.B. dem Lyderkönig Gyges in Verbindung steht, der in den Nachrichten Assurbanipals unter dem Namen Gug(g)u erscheint. M. wäre dann mit Lydien gleichzusetzen. Die Episode erfuhr eine breite Auslegung: Ios…

Kerub

(254 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] (hebr. בורכ, von akkad. karābu, “weihen, grüßen”; Pl. Keruben/ kerubim). Mischwesen mit Menschenkopf, Löwenkörper und Flügeln, das höchste Kraft symbolisiert. Nach Gn 3,24 dienten K. zur Bewachung des Gartens Eden (vgl. auch Ez 28,14 und 16). Bes. Bed. kommt den K. in der biblischen Überl. von der Ausgestaltung des Salomonischen Tempels zu: Im Allerheiligsten befinden sich zwei aus Olivenholz angefertigte und mit Gold überzogene K. von je 10 Ellen Höhe. Mit ihren Flügeln von je 5 Ellen Sp…

Pesah

(446 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] (hebr. psḥ; griech. πάσχα, LXX, bei Phil. de sacrificiis Abelis et Caini 63 und Phil. legum allegoria 3 als διάβασις/ diábasis erklärt; dt. Passah). Alljährlich nach dem jüd. Kalender im Frühjahr vom Abend des 14. bis zum 22. Nisan begangenes jüd. Fest. Es zählt zu den wichtigsten jüd. Festen und erinnert an den Auszug und die Errettung Israels aus Äg. (vgl. Ex 7-14). Zentrales Symbol sind die ungesäuerten Brote (hebr. maṣṣōt), die die Eile des Auszugs versinnbildlichen sollen (Ex 12,34; 14,39). Daher ist alles Gesäuerte vor dem Fest aus dem Haus z…

Aqiba

(148 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] Rabbi A. (ca. 50-135 n. Chr.), bedeutender jüd. Lehrer aus der Zeit von Jabne, erscheint in den Diskussionen um die Auslegung der Schrift häufig als Kontrahent Rabbi Jischmaels. Er spielt im Kontext früher esoterischer Traditionen eine bedeutende Rolle (vgl. die Erzählung von den Vieren, die das Paradies betraten; bHag 14b par.). Er soll Bar Kochba als Messias Israels proklamiert haben (“Stern aus Jakob”; vgl. Nm 24,5), was - wegen der vorwiegend anti-apokalyptischen Tendenz der …

Eliezer ben Hyrkanos

(194 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] Der Rabbi E. (ca. E. 1. bis Anf. 2. Jh.) gehört zu den in der Mischna und im Talmud meistgen. Tannaiten. Über sein Leben liegen zahlreiche legendenhafte Traditionen vor: Nachdem er erst im Alter von über zwanzig Jahren zur Tora gefunden hatte, verließ er sein reiches Elternhaus, um sich dem Studium der Tora im Schülerkreis Rabbi Jochanan ben Zakkais zu widmen. Dort fiel er durch seine große exegetische Begabung auf, die sogar seinen Vater von seinem Entschluß abbrachte, ihn zu en…

Jezira, Sefer ha-

(239 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] (hebr. “Buch der Schöpfung”). Versuch einer systematischen Beschreibung der fundamentalen Prinzipien der Weltordnung. Das nur wenige Seiten umfassende hebr.-sprachige Werk, das in drei verschiedenen Rezensionen vorliegt, entstand wohl zw. dem 3. und 6. Jh. und gehört damit zu den ältesten Texten der jüd. Esoterik. Als Elemente der Schöpfung werden im ersten Teil die zehn Urzahlen sowie im zweiten Teil die zweiundzwanzig Buchstaben des hebr. Alphabets vorgestellt, durch deren Komb…

Geniza

(312 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] Eine G. (“Aufbewahrung”, von aram. gnaz, “verbergen”) ist ein Ort, an dem im Judentum aus dem Gebrauch gezogene Bücher, die den Gottesnamen enthalten, oder Ritualobjekte aufbewahrt werden, um Mißbrauch oder Profanierung auszuschließen. Solche Räume befanden sich häufig in Synagogen; wurden diese abgerissen, dann “bestattete” man die Schriften auf dem Friedhof. Unter der Vielzahl von Genizot der jüd. Welt kommt der G. der Esra-Synagoge von Fusṭāṭ (Alt-Kairo) ganz bes. Bedeutung zu, deren wiss. Erschließung v.a. dem britischen Gelehrten S.…

Elischa ben Abuja

(147 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] (Eliša b. Abuja). Jüd. Gelehrter aus der ersten Hälfte des 2. Jh.n.Chr., gilt in der rabbinischen Lit. als der Prototyp des Apostaten und trägt wohl daher den Namen Aḥer (hebr. “der Andere”). Dabei nennt die legendenhafte rabbinische Überlieferung aber ganz unterschiedliche Häresien: Die Aussage von bHag 15a, wonach er an die Existenz zweier himmlischer Gewalten geglaubt haben soll, läßt auf gnostisches (Gnostiker) Gedankengut schließen; nach yHag 2,1 (77b) soll er alle getötet h…

Gaon

(213 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] (hebr. gāōn, “Erhabenheit”, dann “Exzellenz”; Pl.: Gōnı̄m). Offizieller Titel der Vorsteher der rabbinischen Akademien im babylon. Sura und Pumbedita. Die G. fungierten dort vom 6. Jh. n.Chr. bis zum Ende der Akademien im 11. Jh. als die höchsten Lehrautoritäten (vgl. die Bezeichnung dieser Epoche als “gaonische Zeit”). Als bedeutendste Vertreter dieses Amtes gelten Amram ben Scheschna (gest. ca. 875 n.Chr.; Verf. des frühesten uns erh. Gebetbuches), Saadja ben Josef (882-942; z…

Leviten

(365 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] Nach dem chronistischen Geschichtswerk (Bibel) bilden die L. - von den Priestern deutlich unterschieden - eine Art Klerus minor, der mit der Aufsicht über Tempelhöfe, Vorratskammern mit kultischen Gerät, Opfer und Abgaben betraut bzw. als Sänger, Musiker und Türhüter tätig ist und der die Priester beim Opferdienst unterstützt. Aus unterschiedlichen Genealogien gehen interne Streitigkeiten und Rivalitäten hervor. Die Gesch. der L. ist im einzelnen nur schwer und bedingt aufzuhelle…

Adversus Iudaeos

(216 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] Titel verschiedener patristischer Traktate, die sich apologetisch mit dem Verhältnis des Christentums zum Judentum auseinandersetzen (Tertullianus, Cyprianus, Johannes Chrysostomos, Augustinus) und weitere Werke gleichen Inhalts (Barnabasbrief, der Brief an Diognetos, Justinus' Dialog, die Passa-Homilie des Melito etc.). Im Vordergrund steht weniger Judenfeindschaft und Mission, sondern die innerchristl. Belehrung und rel. Unterweisung, die die christl. Glaubensinhalte angesichts…

Hekhalot-Literatur

(327 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] Die H., zu der als wichtigste Makroformen Hekhalot Rabbati (‘Die großen Paläste), Hekhalot zuṭarti (‘Die kleinen Paläste), Maase Merkaba (‘Das Werk des Thronwagens), Merkaba Rabba (‘Der große Thronwagen), Reuyyot Yeḥeqkel (‘Die Visionen des Ezechiel), Massekhet Hekhalot (‘Traktat der Paläste) und der 3. Henoch gehören, ist ein Zeugnis der frühen jüd. Mystik, für die ein ‘experimentelles, durch lebendige Erfahrung gewonnenes Wissen von Gott’ [4. 4] konstitutiv ist. Eines der bedeutendsten Motive ist die Himmelsre…

Judith

(313 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] (Ιουδιθ, Iudith, Iudit). Das Buch J., das uns h. nur in griech. und (davon abhängig) in lat. Sprache erh. ist und zu den Apokryphen (Apokryphe Literatur) zählt, geht auf ein hebr. Original zurück. In der polit. und mil. schwierigen Lage, in der die Bewohner der Gebirgsstadt Betylia von Holofernes, dem Feldherrn Nebukadnezars belagert werden und daher unter Wassermangel leiden, erscheint J., die Heldin der Erzählung, eine junge, reiche und gottesfürchtige Witwe. Nach der Ermahnung d…

Mamre

(339 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] Nach biblischer Überl. (wahrscheinlich von hebr. Wz. mr, “fett werden, mästen”, als “Ort, der fett ist/macht”; griech. Μάμβρη; lat. Mambre) ein Eichenhain, an dem Abraham [1] einen Altar erbaute (Gn 13,18) und wo ihm bei der gastlichen Aufnahme dreier Männer, als Gotteserscheinung gedeutet, die Geburt seines Sohnes Isaak [1] angekündigt wurde (Gn 18). Nach biblischen Angaben ist diese Ortslage mit Hebron identisch (so Gn 23,17 u.a.; vgl. aber Gen 13,18: “in” bzw. “bei Hebron”). Ab dem 2. Jh.v.Chr.…

Nasi

(168 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] (hebr. “Fürst”). Bezeichnung des jüd. Patriarchen, der nach der Zerstörung des Jerusalemer Tempels (70 n.Chr.) als offizieller Repräsentant des Judentums gegenüber den Römern fungierte und die oberste Autorität in halakhischen Fragen (Halakha) nach innen darstellte. Ob bereits Gamaliel [2] II. (ca. 80-120 n.Chr.) dieses Amt innehatte, ist nicht gewiß; verm. war Simon ben Gamaliel II. (140-175 n.Chr.) der erste N. Die größte Machtentfaltung erfuhr das Amt unter Jehuda ha-Nasi, mei…

Diaspora

(383 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] Der Begriff D. (griech. διασπορά, “Zerstreuung”) bezeichnet israelitische bzw. jüd. Siedlungen, die sich außerhalb Palästinas befinden. Hauptgrund für ihre Entstehung waren Deportationen (Verschleppung) der Bevölkerung aufgrund mil. Eroberungen; daneben spielte auch die Flucht aus polit. Gründen, Auswanderungen wegen wirtschaftlicher Notsituationen oder der Handel eine Rolle. Bei beträchtlichen kulturellen Unterschieden bildete das Land Israel und speziell der Jerusalemer Tempel …

Gamaliel

(288 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] [1] G. I. G. I., »der Alte«; Enkel Hillels, gest. ca 50 Auch “der Alte” gen. (gest. ca. 50 n.Chr.), ein Enkel Hillels. G. war Pharisäer (Pharisaioi) und Mitglied des Sanhedrin (Synhedrion). G., über den histor. nur wenig bekannt ist (zur Problematik vgl. [1]), gilt als der Lehrer des Paulus vor seiner Bekehrung zum christl. Glauben (Apg 22,3). Nach Apg 5,34-39 rettete er durch sein Eingreifen Petrus und andere Apostel vor der Anklage des Sanhedrins. Ego, Beate (Osnabrück) [English version] [2] G. II. G. II., Nachfolger von Jochanan ben Zakkai, 1. Jh. Enkel von [1], wi…

Karäer

(260 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] Die K. sind eine Gruppierung innerhalb des Judentums, die in der 2. H. des 8. Jh.n.Chr. unter der Führung Anans entstand, eines Mitglieds der Exilarchenfamilie (Exilarch), der bei bei der Besetzung des Exilarchats im J. 767 übergangen wurde. Fundament des Karäertums, das sich in verschiedene Unterströmungen aufspaltet, ist die Anerkennung der jüd. Bibel (hebr. miqra) als einziger Grundlage des Glaubens (vgl. daher auch die Bezeichnung K., die sich von hebr. qaraim oder bne bzw. baale-ha-miqra ableitet). Damit stellten die K. die Gültigkeit der Trad.…

Abbahu

(91 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] Jüd. Lehrer und Rabbi (ca. 250-320 n. Chr.), Schulhaupt in Kaisareia [3]. A., Kenner griech. Sprache und Kultur, ist bekannt durch seine Disputationen mit den sog. “Minim” (Häretikern). Umstritten ist, inwiefern Christen zu den Diskussionspartnern A.s zu zählen sind. Darüberhinaus soll er samaritanische Priester seiner Stadt von der jüd. Gemeinde ferngehalten und die Samariter in rituellen Belangen den Heiden gleichgestellt haben. Ego, Beate (Osnabrück) Bibliography L. J. Levine, Caesarea under Roman Rule, SJLA 7, 1975  S. T. Lachs, Rabbi A. and the Minim…

Pumbedita

(133 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] (hebr. pwmbdyt). Stadt am Euphrat in Babylonien, die sich nach rabbinischer Überl. durch ihr fruchtbares Umland (vgl. bPes 88a) auszeichnete und aufgrund des dortigen Flachsvorkommens einen wichtigen Standort der Textilindustrie darstellte (bGit 27a; bBM 18b). Nach dem Sendschreiben des Rav Šerira Gaon befand sich dort bereits in der Zeit des Zweiten Tempels (520 v. Chr. - 70 n. Chr.) ein Zentrum des Studiums der Tora (Pentateuch). Nach der Zerstörung Nehardeas durch die Palmyre…

Halakha

(644 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] Der Terminus H. (abgeleitet von der hebr. Wz. hlk - “gehen”) bezeichnet sowohl eine einzelne jüd. Gesetzesbestimmung oder feststehende Regel als auch das gesamte System der gesetzlichen Bestimmungen der jüd. Tradition. Die Grundlagen dieser Bestimmungen, die nach traditioneller Auffassung als “mündliche Tora” ( Tora she-be-al-pä) und als Mose am Sinai offenbart gelten, bilden die Gesetzescorpora des Pentateuch (z.B. das sog. “Bundesbuch” Ex 20,22-23,19), deuteronomisches Gesetz (Dt 12,1-26,15) oder Heiligkeitsgesetz (Lv 17…

Archisynagogos

(88 words)

Author(s): Ego, Beate (Osnabrück)
[English version] (hebr. rosh ha-knässet). Titel des Synagogenvorstehers, in dessen Verantwortung der Ablauf des Gottesdienstes stand. Das Amt ist für Palästina und die Diaspora lit. (u. a. Mk 5,21-43; Lk 13,14; Act 18,8) und epigraphisch belegt (u. a. CIJ II 991; 1404; 741; 766; CIJ I 265; 336; 383). Da der Titel in späterer Zeit für Frauen und Kinder verwendet wurde, wird diskutiert, ob auch Frauen das Amt innehaben konnten oder ob die Bezeichnung lediglich als Ehrentitel diente . Ego, Beate (Osnabrück) Bibliography Schürer, Bd. 2, 434-436.
▲   Back to top   ▲