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Reformation

(701 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
New Type of Religiosity 1. The Reformation radiating from Germany hosted a confluence of social, political, and religious developments. In terms of religion, the various motifs were focused through scriptural principles, and a teaching on justification. The criticism of the Church by that Church itself led to a collapse of the medieval concept of a unitary Christianity, the Corpus Christianum. Into its place stepped the co-existing confessional churches. In the Protestant regional churches, there arose a new type of Christian religiosity, one characterized by a rational piety, with an orientation to pre…

Luther, Martin

(2,452 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
The Person 1. Martin Luther was born on November 10, 1483, at Eisleben, in Saxony, Germany. In 1505, to fulfill a private vow that he had made in acute fear of death and the Last Judgment, he entered the monastery of Augustinian hermits in Erfurt. His experience of failing to attain a salvific relationship to God even as a monk led him to a gradual change of attitude and the ‘reformatory turn’ that he later stylized in his self-interpretation as a sudden experience of …

Schriftprinzip, protestantisches

(705 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
Date: 2019-11-19

Gemeinde

(1,096 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
1. Christliche 1.1. Spätmittelalter, Reformation und KonfessionalisierungAusgehend von der seit der Karolingerzeit gültigen parochialen Struktur der Kirche (d. h. der Zuordnung von Wohnsitz und kirchlicher G.-Zugehörigkeit) entwickelte sich im späten MA ein starkes Bewusstsein insbes. der städtischen G. als sozialer Zusammenhang in politischer…
Date: 2019-11-19

Gewissen

(738 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
Der G.-Begriff wurde im späten MA in Fortführung der Vorstellung eines G.-Funkens u. a. bei dem lat. Kirchenvater Hieronymus mit der mystischen Vorstellung vom Seelenfünklein produktiv weiterentwickelt. Für die Formierung des nzl. G.-Begriffs war die zunehmend wachsende Kluft zwischen individuellen Überzeugungen und überindividuellen Bindungen an gesellschaftliche Normen und an staatliches Recht entscheidend – eine Kluft, die zuerst in der Religionsfrage fassbar wurde. Die reformatorische TheologieMartin Luthers wurde von dem evang. Theologen Karl Holl geradezu al…
Date: 2019-11-19

Teufelsglaube

(899 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
1. TeufelsvorstellungenDer Teufel hatte in der Frühen Nz. eine Bedeutung sowohl als heilsgeschichtlicher Gegenspieler Gottes wie auch als negative Wirkmacht, deren Kraft unmittelbar in dieser Welt spürbar war. Für die Ausgestaltung des T. blieb entscheidend, wie sich diese reale Gegenüberstellung mit Gottes Allmacht vertrug.Insbes. im Werk Martin Luthers zeigt sich dieses Bemühen paradigmatisch für die nzl. Reflexion: Zum einen wird im anthropologisch zugespitzten Bild der Mensch als Reittier Gottes einerseits, des Teufels andererseits verstanden, wobei sich …
Date: 2019-11-19

Conscience

(792 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
In the late Middle Ages, the notion of a “spark of conscience” found, for example, in the work of the Latin church father Jerome, was developed productively into the mystical notion of the spark of the soul. For the formation of the early modern term  conscience, the decisive factor was the increasing gap between individual convictions and supraindividual obligations to social norms and laws imposed by the state – a gap that first became identifiable in the religious question. The Protestant theologian Karl Holl has even called the Reform…
Date: 2019-10-14

Scripture principle, Protestant

(762 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
The conciliarist controversies of the late Middle Ages over the supremacy of the pope or a council within the church made the question of an authoritative basis for ecclesiastical doctrinal decisions outside the human institutions of the church increasingly controversial. Drawing on the thought of William of Ockham, theologians developed concepts that emphasized the questionable nature of decisions by the papacy and councils (Council [ecclesiastical]), while advocating a…
Date: 2021-08-02

Congregation

(1,187 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
1. Christian 1.1. Late Middle Ages, Reformation, and ConfessionalizationThe parochial structure of the church had been the norm since the Carolingian period (i.e. the association of one’s place of residence with membership in an ecclesiastical congregation). In the late Middle Ages, there developed a strong sense – especially in urban areas – of the congregation as a social nexus politically as well as religiously, so that in this context we can even speak of a  corpus Christianum (“Christian body”) in microcosm [3]. This self-conception, both communal and parochial, g…
Date: 2019-10-14

Devil, belief in

(1,027 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
1. Concepts of the DevilThe Devil in the early modern period had a double role as an opponent of God in the narrative of salvation and as a negative force whose effects were tangible in the everyday world. The key factor in the shaping of belief in the Devil was how this concept of opposition worked in relation to the omnipotence of God.Concern for this issue in early modern reflection is well exemplified in the works of Martin Luther. On the one hand, there is a pointedly anthropological idea of the human individual as a vehicle for both God and the Dev…
Date: 2019-10-14

Denck, Hans

(291 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (c. 1500, Heybach – Nov 1527, Basel). After completing his studies at Ingolstadt (1517–1519), where he was formatively influenced by humanism, ¶ Denck acted as a school rector in Nuremberg from 1523, upon the recommendation of J. Oecolampadius. The ideas of A.B. v. Karlstadt and T. Müntzer strengthened his criticism of the Nuremberg Reformation, which, in his opinion, did too little to encourage inner transformation within the human being. This …

Campanus, Johannes

(159 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (c. 1500, Maaseik – after 1574). After studying at Cologne and a stay in the duchy of Jülich, Campanus came to Wittenberg c. 1527/1528. His exclusion from the debate at the Colloquy of Marburg (Disputations, Religious: I) marked the beginning of his conflict with the Wittenberg Reformers, which was intensified in 1530 when he disputed the divinity of the Holy Spirit. He soon returned to Jülich, where a warrant for his arrest (at first not executed) was issued in 1532. His

Walch

(485 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] 1. Johann Georg (Jun 17, 1693, Meiningen – Jan 13, 1775, Jena). Walch began studying classical languages and ancient history in 1710 at Leipzig, where he delivered his first lectures on classical philology as Magister. In 1718 he was appointed professor of philosophy and antiquities at Jena; in 1719 rhetoric was added and poetry in 1722. In 1724, ev…

Hilten, Johann

(151 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker

Occam, William of

(2,010 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] I. Life – II. Work – III. Influence (Venerabilis Inceptor; c. 1285, Ockham, England – Apr 9, 1347, Munich) I. Life William probably studied a reduced program of arts at the Franciscan college in London before proceeding in 1308 to study theology at the University of Oxford. Here he delivered his lectures on the Sentences from 1317 to 1319. It is not clear whether, or to what extent, William was involved in the disputes between the mendicant orders and the university. In any case, he came under sharp philosophical attack, especially from t…

Robespierre, Maximilien

(380 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (May 6, 1758, Arras – Jul 28, 1794, Paris), lawyer. In 1789 Robespierre became a member of the États-Généraux and of the National Assembly (France : III, 1.i), as deputy of the Third Estate. He occupied a central function for the course of the French Revolution, as spokesman for the Jacobin Club. In 1792 he became one of the leaders of the radical Montagnards in the National Convention; his attacks on the king and the monarchy became increasingly outspoken. In July 1793 he became a member of the Co…

Maistre, Joseph Marie, Comte de

(247 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (Apr 1, 1753, Chambéry – Feb 26, 1821, Turin). After studying law in Turin from 1769 to 1772, Maistre practiced law in his home town, and in 1773 became a freemason (Freemasons). His career reached its peak in 1788 when he became senator of Savoy. The military encroachment of the French Revolution into his home town in 1792 forced him to emigrate the following year to Lausanne. This destabilizing experience made him a political advocate of the Restoration (

Lardner, Nathaniel

(178 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (Jun 6, 1684, Hawkhurst, Kent – Jul 24, 1768, Hawkhurst, Kent). After his formation at a Presbyterian academy in London from 1699 to 1703 and studying in Utrecht and Leiden, Lardner was an independent preacher from 1709, and a private chaplain and tutor from 1713. While officiating as an assistant preacher in London (from 1721), he worked on his main publication, a work of popular enlightenment entitled The Credibility of the Gospel History (17 vols., 1…

Adso

(79 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (c. 910–992), reforming abbot of Montier-en-Der (from 967/68) and St. Bénigne (c. 982–985). Adso composed lives of various saints and (between 949 and 954) an influential summary of the Antichrist tradition in biographical form. In it, Adso categorized the West Frankish Carolingians (to whom his patron Gerberga was related by marriage) as the heirs of Rome in God's plan of salvation.…

Bible of the Poor,

(288 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] Biblia pauperum, was the name given to the Bible abbreviations for preaching purposes in the late Middle Ages. Technically “Bible of the Poor” denotes a specific, primarily pictorial work of monastic provenance. As far as it can be reconstructed, its earliest, originally anonymous exemplar was written in the southeastern German language area in…

Pacca, Bartolomeo

(270 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker

Staël, Anne Louise Germaine de

(80 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] Baroness de Stäel-Holstein (Apr 22, 1766, Paris – Jul 14, 1817, Paris). As an exile during the French Revolution, Mme. de Staël was the central figure of a European network of communication. Refracting the ideas of J.-J. Rousseau through the lens of early German Romanticism, she wrote in criticism of the social conventionality restricting women, and preached the perfecting of humanity in history. Volker Leppin …

Henry of Kalkar

(169 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (1328, Kalkar – Dec 20, 1408, Cologne). Henry of Kalkar received the M.A. in Paris in 1357, and later the Bacc.theol. Renouncing already acquired benefices, he entered the Charterhouse of Cologne (Carthusians) in 1365. From 1368 to 1396, he held leading positions in charterhouses near Arnhem and Roermond, in Cologne, and near Strasbourg, while also officiating as visitor of his province from 1375 ¶ onward. In performing the spiritual dimension of these …

Heidelberg, University of

(493 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] The university founded in 1386 by Rupert I, Elector Palatine, was initially staffed by scholars forced out of Paris and Prague because of ecclesial and national opposition. The founding rector Marsilius of Inghen guided Heidelberg on the path of a moderate via moderna; from 1452, the via antiqua shared equal rights. The scholastic manner of instruction (Scholasticism) was supplemented after 1456 with the humanist (Humanism: III), but not profoundly altered. Brought to the Lutheran Reformation in 1558 by Ottheinrich (1556–1559)…

Sudermann, Daniel

(137 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (1550, Liège – after 1630, Straßburg [Strasbourg]). Though born into a Catholic family, Sudermann came into contact with Calvinism, Lutheranism, and Anabaptism early on. Having worked as a private tutor, after 1585 he served as an educator of the nobility at the Bruderhof in Straßburg. He had already come in contact with the ideas of K. v. Schwenckfeld, some of whose writings he began publishing in 1584. H…

Jena, University

(992 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] After the loss of the Kurkreis with Wittenberg University (Wittenberg, University of) ¶ as a consequence of the Schmalkaldic War, the University of Jena constituted the state university of Ernestine Saxony and its successor states. During the imprisonment of Ernst Friedrich, a school of higher education was established in Jena in 1548. Its first teachers included such important but contrasting figures as V. Strigel, a student of Melanchthon, and the strict Lutheran E. Schnepf (from 1549). The fact that the Ernestin…

Matthew of Krakow

(161 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (before 1350, Krakow –Mar 5, 1410, Heidelberg). Matthew studied in Prague (1367, M.A.; 1384, professor of theology), where he worked also as a clergy-critical preacher and as an edifying writer. In 1394, he went to Heidelberg University, where he became rector in 1396/1397. After supporting the building up of theological studies in Krakow from 1397, he returned to Heidelberg before 1400, and carried out diplomat…

Marbeck, Pilgram

(246 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (c. 1495, Rattenberg, Tyrol – 1556, Augsburg). In his home town Marbeck was given in 1525 the office of Bergrichter (mountain magistrate). He resisted the unreasonable request to use this function to put an end to Anabaptist activity. He gave up his office after the execution of the Anabaptist preacher Leonhard Schiemer in 1528, and was probably baptized himself in Krumau (Bohemia). In 1528 he was granted citizenship of Strasbourg. With his mystical theology of suffering discipleship leading through…

Hut, Hans

(164 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (c. 1490, Haina – Dec 6, 1527, Augsburg). From 1524 and under the influence of A. Bodenstein von Karlstadt and T. Müntzer (Anabaptists), Hut, a bookkeeper, rejected infant baptism and was baptized in 1526 by H.Denck. After participating in the Peasants' War in the hope that it might bring about the eschatological cleansing, he reacted to its failure by prolonging Müntzer's millenarianism (III, 3), now expecting the judgment of the wicked and the thousand-year kingdom to com…

Kautz, Jakob

(163 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (c. 1500, Großbockenheim – after 1532, probably in Moravia). On Jun 9, 1527, Jakob Kautz, then preacher (from 1524) in Worms, publicly posted “Seven Articles” that stressed the importance of the “inner word” under the influence of H. Denck and rejected infant baptism as well as the notion of the Real Presence; the intended disputation was probably meant to i…

Bader, Johannes

(181 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (c. 1470, Zweibrücken – Aug 10 or 15, 1545, Landau). Formerly a teacher and chaplain at the court of Zweibrücken, Bader became pastor in Landau in 1518. Because of his Reformational preaching from 1522 onward, the clerical court of Speyer banned him in 1524, but the council of Landau protected him. His work influenced …

Hoffmann, Melchior

(364 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (c. 1500, Schwäbisch-Hall – 1543, Strasbourg) was a Spiritualist (Spiritualism: II, 1) and an Anabaptist. Hoffmann was active from 1523 as a lay preacher in Livonia. He placed the mysticism of suffering imparted by A. Bodenstein von Karlstadt in an apocalyptic context. The time before the Last Day announced for 1533 was to bring Christians suffering, but also knowledge, directly conveyed by the Spirit. Despite a certificate of orthodoxy issued by Luther in 1525, Hoffmann was expel…

Bader, Augustin

(167 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (died Mar 30, 1530, Stuttgart). The Augsburg weaver Bader, who was released from a brief imprisonment in 1527 following his tactical rev…

Naudé, Philipp

(168 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (Dec 28, 1654, Metz – Mar 7, 1729, Berlin). During his service as a page at the Saxon-Eisenach court in Marksuhl (c. 1666 to 1670), Naudé became familiar with German culture and the internal differences within Protestantism. After the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, he came to Brandenburg in 1687 by way of Saarbrücken and Hanau. There he embarked on a career in mathematics (1687 teaching in the Gymnasium in Joachimsthal, appointed court mathematician in 1696, made a made member…

Henry of Ghent

(152 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (d. Jun 29, 1293, Tournai) supported the Beguines as archdeacon in Brügge (from 1276/1277) and Tournai (from 1279) and had decisive influence as magister regens of theology in Paris from 1275 to 1292. Although he was involved in the condemnation of rigorous Aristotelianism (his role was never completely clarified), during the various stages of his intellectual development, he nevertheless followed Avicenna and Augustine in placing Aristotelian modes of thought in the context of a Christian Neoplatonism (II). The active and critical reception of his thinking, as recorded in his

Henry Bate of Mechelen/Malines

(119 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (Mar 24, 1246, Mechelen – c. 1310). Henry Bate studied the artes in Paris c. 1266–1272; after 1281 he held various clerical offices in Liège. Besides his interest in astronomy and astrology (translating treatises of Ibn Ezra and Abu Ma'zar, Tabulae mechlinenses), he composed a metaphysically oriented, compilatory Speculum based on a hierarchical structure of the intelligible world, displaying influences ranging from Aristotelianism (including Siger of Brabant) to Neoplatonism (esp. Proclus). Volke…

Tauler, Johannes

(556 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[German Version] (c.1300, Strasbourg – Jun 16, 1361, Strasbourg). Al…

Niclaes

(133 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[English Version] Niclaes,  Heinrich (9./10.1.1502 Münster? – nach 1570). Von Jugend an visionär begabt, zog N. nach seiner Berufung zum Propheten 1540 von Amsterdam nach Emden. Spätma. myst. Vorstellungen baute er zu einem prophetisch-chiliastischen Spiritualismus aus. Sich selbst verstand er vor dem Hintergrund pantheistischer Ontologie als Neuinkarnation Christi. Durch Missionsreisen breitete sich das »Haus der Liebe« (engl. »Family of Love«, daher: Familisten) aus, das aufgrund von Geisterfahru…

Tauler

(451 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[English Version] Tauler, Johannes (ca.1300 Straßburg – 16.6.1361 ebd.). T. war neben Meister Eckhart und H. Seuse wichtigster Vertreter der deutschsprachigen Dominikanermystik (Mystik: III.,3.,b) am Oberrhein. Im Straßburger Konvent, dem er mit etwa 14 Jahren beigetreten war, ausgebildet, verfügte er über keinen theol. Abschluß, aber über gute Bildung; philos. hatte er Teil an der Neuplatonismusrenaissance im Domin…

Pacca

(237 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[English Version] Pacca, Bartolomeo (25.12.1756 Benevent – 19.4.1844 Rom). 1785 wurde der aus einer adeligen Familie stammende Doktor beider Rechte zum Titularbf. von Damiette geweiht und trat ohne Anerkennung des dortigen Erzbischofs das 1785 verliehene Amt als Nuntius in Köln an. Gegen den Episkopalismus (: II., Emser Kongreß) vertrat er entschieden die päpstl. Haltung. Als Nuntius in Lissabon (1794/95–1802) kämpfte er – 1801 zum Kardinal erhoben – ebenso entschieden gegen die staatskirchl. Tende…

Wilhelm von Ockham (Ehrenname: Venerabilis Inceptor; ca.1285 Ockham – 9.4.1347 München)

(1,763 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[English Version] I. Leben W. hat sein artes-Studium wohl in reduzierter Form am Ordensstudium der Franziskaner in London absolviert, ehe er wohl 1308 zum Theologiestudium an die Universität Oxford wechselte. Hier hielt er 1317–1319 seine Sentenzenvorlesung. Ungeklärt ist, ob und wieweit W. in die Streitigkeiten zw. den Bettelorden und der Universität involviert war. Jedenfalls kam es bald zu scharfen philos. Attacken, v.a. …

Professio fidei Tridentinae

(206 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[English Version] . In Aufnahme einer Anregung franz. Kardinäle, die angesichts des königlichen Nominationsrechts in Frankreich den röm.-kath. Glauben der Bischöfe sichern wollten, schrieben die Trienter Dekrete der 24. und 25. Sitzung 1563 für Bischöfe und sonstige Seelsorger die Ablegung eines erweiterten Glaubensbekenntnisses bei Amtsantritt und für akademische Lehrer eine regelmäßige eidliche Verpflichtung auf Katholizität vor (Amtseid der Geistlichen und Kirchenbeamten). Den vermutlich im Umk…

Schwenckfeld

(654 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[English Version] Schwenckfeld, Kaspar v. (1489 Ossig – 10.12.1561 Ulm). Der aus einer schlesischen Adelsfamilie stammende Sch. von Ossig stand nach Studien in Köln und Frankfurt/O. in seiner Heimat in adeligem Dienst, den er 1523 aus gesundheitlichen Gründen quittierte. Sch. wurde früh zum Anhänger Luthers und versuchte in ausgedehnter Predigttätigkeit und persönlicher Einflußnahme auf Herzog Friedrich II. von Liegnitz (1480–1547), die Reformation in Schlesien zu verbreiten. Mit der frühen Abhängigkeit von Luther nahm er auch starke myst. Züge in seine eigene Theol. auf, die er dann zu einer eigenständigen, ihn zunehmend in Distanz zu Luther bringenden spiritualistischen Theol. (Spiritualismus: II.) ausbaute. Hintergrund hierfür war auch seine Kritik an einer unzureichenden Verwirklichung der Ref…

Walch

(399 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[English Version] 1.Johann Georg , (17.6.1693 Meiningen – 13.1.1775 Jena). Nach Studium der alten Sprachen und Gesch. in Leipzig ab 1710 und dortigen ersten Vorlesungen als Magister der klassischen Philol. wurde W. 1718 Prof. für Philos. und Altertümer in Jena, 1719 für Beredsamkeit, 1722 zugleich für Poesie. Noch vor seiner theol. Promotion 1726 erhielt er 1724 eine a.o. Professur für Theol. 1728 wurde er Ordinarius. Vorlesungen seines Schwiegervaters J.F. Buddeus zur polemischen Theol. baute er zu einer Darstellung der Religi…

Thomä

(79 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[English Version] Thomä, Nikolaus (1492 Siegelsbach bei Heilbronn – 1546 Bergzabern). Ab 1510 in Heidelberg immatrikuliert, wurde Th. 1519 Pfarrer in Flinsbach, 1520 Magister. Ab 1524 war er Geistlicher und Lateinlehrer in Bergzabern. Im Abendmahlsstreit (Abendmahl: II.,3.) auf schweizerischer Seite, stand er, zumal seit der Auseinandersetzung mit Täufern (1527 Begegnung mit H. Denck), zunehmend unter M. Bucers Einfluß. …

Robespierre

(323 words)

Author(s): Leppin, Volker
[English Version] Robespierre, Maximilien de (6.5.1758 Arras – 28.7.1794 Paris). Der Jurist R. wurde 1789 als Deputierter des Dritten Standes Mitglied der Generalstände und der Nationalversammlung (Frankreich: III.,1., i). In eine zentrale Funktion für den Verlauf der Französischen Revolution kam er als Sprecher des Jakobinerclubs. 1792 wurde er im Nationalkonvent einer der Anführer der radikalen Bergpartei. Mit zunehmender Deutlichkeit foc…
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