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Epii

(103 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Ἐπειοί; Epeipoí). The oldest population in Elis (Pind. Ol. 9,58).  Augeias was regarded as one of their kings (Pind. Ol. 10,35; Hom. Il. 11,698). According to the Homeric catalogue of ships, the E. fall into four different groups (Hom. Il. 2,618-625). Nestor reports of conflicts between the E. and Pylians in Hom. Il. 11,670-762. According to Paus. 5,1,4; 8, they were named after Epius, but later their name was changed into Elii (cf. also Hecat. FGrH 1 F 25). Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography E. Visser, Homers Katalog der Schiffe, 1997, 195; 556-557; 562-563 B. Hainsworth…

Eleos

(121 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Ἔλεος; Éleos). ‘Compassion’. Appears personified in Timocles fr. 33 PCG. An altar dedicated to E. stood on a market square in Athens (Paus. 1,17,1; Diod. Sic. 13,22,7) [1], a well-known  asylon/asylum (Lucian Demonax 57 and schol.; Schol. Aeschin. 2,15). According to Apollod. 2,167, it was there that the Heraclides sought refuge, according to Philostr. Epistula 39, they even appear as the founders of the altar. According to Aristotle's poetic theory, through éleos and phóbos (‘pity and fear’), tragedy should lead to  katharsis (Aristot. Poet. 5, 1449 …

Botres

(76 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Βότρης; Bótrēs). Son of the Theban Eumelus. When the latter, in B.'s presence, is about to sacrifice a sheep to Apollo, B. eats the animal's brains before it is placed on the altar. Thereupon his father strikes him with a firebrand. Apollo, however, takes pity on him and turns him into the bird, Aeropus (Bee-eater), which broods in an underground nest and continually seeks to fly (Ant. Lib. 18). Bloch, René (Berne)

Diores

(130 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
(Διώρης; Diṓrēs). [German version] [1] Son of Amarynceus Son of  Amarynceus [1]. One of the four leaders of the Epeians from Elis who went to Troy. He was killed by the Thracian Peirous (Hom. Il. 2,622; 4,517; Paus. 5,3,4). Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography …

Demodice

(111 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Δημοδίκη; Dēmodíkē). Second wife of the Boeotian king  Athamas and stepmother of Phrixus whom she pursues in unrequited love. Phrixus takes flight for this reason (Pind. fr. 49, Damodika; Schol. Pind. Pyth. 4,288a). Usually she is called  Ino (Apollod. 1,80-84). In another version she is the wife of Cretheus, brother of Athamas. She slanders Phrixus, who will not return her love, before Cretheus, whereupon he demands Phrixus' death from Athamas. However, Phrixus is removed by his mother  Nephele (Hyg. Poet. Astr. 2,20).…

Euphrosyne

(61 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Εὐφροσύνη; Euphrosýne, ‘cheerfulness’). One of the  Charites (Hes. Theog. 909; Pind. Ol. 14,14; Apollod. 1,13). In Hyg. Poet. Fab. praef. E. is a daughter of Erebos and  Nyx (cf. Gratia in Cic. Nat. D. 3,44). In Orph. H. 3,5 E. is an epithet of Nyx. Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography K.-H. Tomberg, E. B. Harrison, s.v. Charis, Charites, LIMC 3.1, 191-203.

Doris

(518 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne) | Funke, Peter (Münster)
(Δωρίς; Dōrís). [German version] I. Personal names Feminine shortened version of the name Eúdōros and similar, likely often understood as ‘the giver’ (cf.

Eumelus

(707 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne) | von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) | Latacz, Joachim (Basle)
(Εὔμηλος; Eúmēlos). [German version] [1] Leader of the pherae. fleet against Troy Son of  Admetus and  Alcestis. He led (only) 11 ships from Pherae against Troy (Hom. Il. 2,711-715) [1]. Although he had the best horses (Hom. Il. 2,763-767), he did not win the chariot race at the funeral games for Patroclus, as Athena broke the yoke of his chariot (Hom. Il. 23,391-397). Achilles nevertheless awarded him a prize (23, 533-538). According to Apollod. epit. 5,5, he is said to have won at the funeral games for Ac…

Iapetus

(185 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Ἰαπετός; Iapetós). The etymology is uncertain, perhaps ‘the one hurled down’ (on ἰάπτειν; iáptein, ‘to hurl’ [1]). The often postulated connection to OT Japheth, the third son of Noah (Gen. 5,32 et passim), cannot be proven [2; 3]. I. is the titan who was hurled by Zeus into Tartarus along with  Kronos (Hom. Il. 8,479). Son of  Gaia and  Uranus (Hes. Theog. 134). He fathered the sons  Atlas [2],  Menoetius,  Prometheus and Epimetheus with the Oceanid Clymene (Hes. Theog. 507-511). Among others, Asia (Apollod. 1…

Eetion

(371 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome)
(Ἠετίων; Ēetíon, linguistically probably not of Greek origin [1]). Name, especially of foreign heroes. [German version] [1] King of the Cilicians in Mysian Thebe King of the Cilicians in Mysian Thebe (Hom. Il. 1,366). His daughter  Andromache told her husband Hector how Achilles killed her father E. and her seven brothers during the conquest of Thebe: Achilles set up …

Euryale

(47 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)

Dione

(228 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Διώνη; Diṓnē, cf. Ζεύς, Διός; Zeús, Diós). Perhaps Zeus' original wife [1], though she was already replaced by  Hera in Mycenaean times (cf. PY Tn 316). A coin from Epirus [2] shows an enthroned D., with Zeus on the verso; in the Zeus sanctuary at  Dodona, she was worshipped alongside Zeus [3].  Aphrodite was also regarded as the daughter of the two (Hom. Il. 5,370; Eur. Hel. 1098; [4]; Theoc. Id. 15,106; 17,36; cf. Pl. Symp. 180d). In Cic. Nat. D. 3,23, D. is the mother of the third V…

Eurymedon

(520 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne) | Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Martini, Wolfram (Gießen)
(Εὐρυμέδων; Eurymédōn, ‘far-prevailing’ [2]). The name of several heroes, usable in hexameters. [German version] [1] King of the Giants King of the  Giants, by his daughter Periboea grandfather of Nausithous the son of Poseidon, ancestor of the Phaeacian kings. E. brought himself and his people to ruin (Hom. Od. 7,58-60 with schol. and Eust.). According to  Euphorion fr. 99 Powell (schol. Hom. Il. 14,295-296) he raped Hera, whereupon she bore  Prometheus. For this Zeus later hurled E. into the Tartarus. Bloch, René (Berne) Bibliography 1 F. Vian, s.v. E.1, LIMC 4.1, 105 2 Kamptz 84, …

Eurybates

(110 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)

Enceladus

(103 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (Ἐγκέλαδος; Enkélados, ‘The Raging One’, from κελαδέω; keladéō; EM. s.v. E. 310,35 Gaisford; Hsch. s.v. E.). One of the  giants, son of Tartarus and Ge (Hyg. Fab. praef. 4). He fought against Zeus (Batr. 283), Dionysus (Eur. Cycl.5-9) and─according to the most widely dissemina…

Exuviae

(185 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
[German version] (from exuere, ‘take off, remove’). In addition to its profane meaning (‘discarded items of clothing, captured weapons, stripped animal hide’), exuviae (cf. ThlL s.v. exuviae) is used to signify the attributes of the gods that are paraded on festiv…

Basilinda

(101 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)

Dryope

(212 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
(Δρυόπη; Dryópē). [German version] [1] Nymph, transformed into a tree Name of a nymph. Two widely diverging accounts exist of D.'s metamorphosis. According to Nik. in Antonius Liberalis 32, D. was the daughter of  Dryops and wife of  Andraemon [2]. She took onto her lap Apollo, who had been transformed into a tortoise, and subsequently gave birth to  Amphissus. D. was abducted by the nymphs with whom she played as a girl and to whose world she originally belonged. In her place, a black poplar and a spring…

Echeclus

(108 words)

Author(s): Bloch, René (Berne)
(Ἔχεκλος; Écheklos). [German version] [1] Son of the Trojan Agenor Son of the Trojan Agenor, killed by Achilles (Hom. Il. 20,474). Paus. 10,27,2 points to a parallel motive in the Iliad parva (18 PEG I) where the son of Achill…
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