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Dual

(226 words)

Author(s): Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] Numerical category, which in contrast to the sg. (singular) and pl. (plural) denotes a (conjugate or accidental) duality. While the dual was used extensively in the Indo-European parent language throughout the whole inflection system for nouns and verbs, in most individual Indo-European languages it survives only in a more rudimentary form. The most extensive dual-system is preserved in Indo-Iranian, whereas in Latin, for example, the only vestiges of dual inflection are to be found in duo < duō ‘two’ and ambō ‘both’ (dat.-abl. duōbus, ambōbus). Dual forms occur …

Syntax

(682 words)

Author(s): Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main)
σύνταξις/ sýntaxis in Apollonius [11], Latin constructio in Priscian; it deals with the sentence as the basic form of meaningful utterances, and with its structure and constituents. [German version] I. Foundations Syntactic analysis is based on the differentiation between the parts of speech and their use as sentence elements or constituents, already developed by the ancient grammarians (μέρη τοῦ λόγου/ mérē toû lógou, Lat. partes orationis 'parts of speech': e.g. ὄνομα/ ónoma, Lat. vocabulum 'noun'; ῥῆμα/ rhêma, Lat. verbum 'verb'; in their use as sentence constituents: …

Language

(1,091 words)

Author(s): Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] The term designates the primary medium of human communication and the ability to communicate by means of it, as well as the specific occurrences of this medium of communication as adopted by individual speech communities (i.e. individual languages). In the former definition, language was already an object of scientific consideration ( Linguistic theory) in antiquity, Plato's dialogue ‘Cratylus’ being its most prominent product. Plato discusses, among other things, the question, if ‘names’ originated θέσει/ thései (i.e. ‘by fixation’ or ‘agreement’ of th…

Thematic vowel

(198 words)

Author(s): Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] Vocalic element used (alone or in combination with preceding sounds) to form word stems (Greek θέμα/ théma). In Indo-European languages, TVs typically appear as e and o; they are characteristic of both nominal stems (e.g. the accusative singular Latin agrum, Greek ἀγρόν/ agrón, Sanskrit ájram, from the underlying stem * h2aǵ-r=o- ‘field’, known as the o-declension) and verbal stems (e.g. the present stem * h2aǵ-e/o- underlying Latin agite/agunt, Greek ἄγετε/ἄγουσι(ν) ( ágete/ ágousi(n)), Sanskrit ajata/ajanti ‘drive (imperative plural)’/‘they drive’). O…

Language change

(756 words)

Author(s): Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] I. General A universal tendency of human language is perpetual change on all levels caused by external factors (e.g. Language contact) as well as internal ones (e.g. anomalies). Language change (LC) over a long period of time in any given language will first lead to dialectal diversification ( Language strata), then, esp. in cases of geographical separation, may result in a division into related yet independent languages. It is therefore reasonable to assume that not only languag…

Language strata

(763 words)

Author(s): Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main) | Binder, Vera (Gießen)
[German version] I. Overview From a synchronic point of view, ‘language strata’ (LS) represents a cover term for the different forms that a given language takes in its use by individual speakers (idiolect), by speaker groups defined by their social position (sociolect) or by geographically determined speaker communities ( Dialect); from a diachronic point of view, LS refers to the various historical strata of a given language that can be identified on the lexical (inherited and loan vocabulary), grammatical (syntactic or morphological) and phonological levels. The existence of L…

Syncretism

(1,979 words)

Author(s): Gordon, Richard L. (Ilmmünster) | Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main)
I. In the context of religious studies [German version] A. General remarks In a religious context, syncretism can be defined as the process of either a peaceable or a contentious mutual permeation of elements taken from two or more traditions [1]. Here 'tradition' is inevitably an ambiguous concept; in considering Antiquity, scholars traditionally distinguish between 'internal syncretism' and 'contact-based syncretism'. 'Internal syncretism' refers to the transfer of manifestations, names and epithets from one deity to another within a single polytheisti…

Synkretismus

(1,756 words)

Author(s): Gordon, Richard L.; Ü:S.KR. | Gippert, Jost
I. Religionswissenschaftlich [English version] A. Allgemeines Im rel. Bereich kann S. als der Prozeß der friedlichen oder strittigen gegenseitigen Durchdringung von Elementen aus zwei oder mehr Traditionen definiert werden [1]. “Trad.” ist hierbei notwendigerweise ein mehrdeutiger Begriff; für die Ant. unterscheidet man herkömmlicherweise zw. “internem S.” und “Kontakt-S.”. Als “interner S.” wird die Übertragung von Erscheinungsformen, Namen und Epitheta von einer Gottheit auf eine andere innerhalb eines einzigen polytheistischen Systems beze…

Analogie

(826 words)

Author(s): Crubellier, Michel (Villeneuve d'Ascq) | Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main)
[English version] [1] philosophisch Ἀναλογία, ἀνὰ λόγον bezeichnen urspr. die mathematische Proportion, d. h. die Gleichheit von Zahlen- oder Größenverhältnissen (Definition: Eukl. elem. 5, Def. 5 und 6; 7, Def. 20; Aristot. eth. Nic. 5,6; 1131 a 6-b9 poet. 21,11-14; 1457 b 16-30). Die Lehre von den Proportionen wurde zunächst als Problemlösungsinstrument benutzt, entwickelte sich jedoch sehr bald zu einer allg. theoretischen Konstruktion, die Euklid im fünften Buch der ›Elemente‹ darstellt. Platon …

Analogy

(895 words)

Author(s): Crubellier, Michel (Villeneuve d'Ascq) | Gippert, Jost (Frankfurt/Main)
[German version] [1] Philosophical Ἀναλογία, ἀνὰ λόγον ( Analogía, anà lógon) designate originally the mathematical proportion, i.e., the correspondence of numerical or volume relationships (definition: Euc. 5, Def. 5 and 6; 7, Def. 20; Aristot. Eth. Nic. 5,6; 1131 a 6-b9 Poet. 21,11-14; 1457 b 16-30). The teachings about proportions were used in the first instance as a tool to solve problems; it soon developed, however, into a general theoretical construction, which Euclid presented in the fifth book of …
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