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Mountain sanctuaries

(357 words)

Author(s): Frateantonio, Christa (Gießen) | Kunz, Heike (Tübingen)
[German version] MS (= sanctuaries on rises or anticlines) were to be found in various ancient civilizations. Among the oldest monuments known to archeology are the so-called fire sanctuaries of Baal in the Near East [1]. It has been assumed that the numerous sanctuaries of the 2nd millennium on Crete were influenced by this tradition [2. 60f.]. More than 20 MS have been found there, identifiable by excavated clay figures and traces of altars. Another form of MS is represented by Greek cult sites of the Classical period (mainland, islands, Asia Minor) on heights outs…

Dedicatio

(171 words)

Author(s): Frateantonio, Christa (Gießen)
[German version] (from dedicare, ‘dedicate/consecrate’). In Latin texts (inscriptions and literature) the most frequent expression for the transfer of objects and property (plots of land, temples, altars, votive offerings) to a divinity. The term was used in connection with private as well as official  dedications (private i.a. Suet. Vit. 7,10,3 and Dig. 24,1,5,12; official i.a. Suet. Tib. 3,40,1 and Dig. 1,8,6,3). The distinction between private and official dedicatio resided in the fact that in the case of official dedication the object or item of property ac…

Consecratio

(544 words)

Author(s): Frateantonio, Christa (Gießen)
[German version] Verbal noun of

Bacchanal(ia)

(634 words)

Author(s): Frateantonio, Christa (Gießen)
[German version] In its oldest source, the   senatus consultum de Bacchanalibus from 186 BC, the Latin word bacchanal is used in the singular to designate a place of cult worship (Schuhmacher, Roman Inscription II 11). In the plural, it designates religious groups and cult rituals (Macrob. Sat. 1,18,1-5). The term bacchanal is based on a cult name of  Bacchus, the Greek Dionysus, or rather his offshoot Pacha, epithet of the Etruscan god Fufluns who was identified with Dionysus [1. 127] (detailed history of the term [6. 24f.]). It is controversial what type of cult place a bacchanal could have been (‘an initiation grotto’? a place for ‘mystery cults’?), because the existence of bacchanal in Rome and Italy is taken for granted in the senatus consultum and by Livius (39,8-19) but could as yet not be proved with certainty by archaeology. We know of both Dionysus sanctuaries ( stibadeia), such as in Pompeii and Sentinum [5. 651], and of Etruscan cult places of Fufluns Pachies [1. 129f.]. Livy describe…
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