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Camboricum

(30 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] ‘Ford on the river bend’ (It. Ant. 474,7), presumably modern Icklingham (Suffolk) [1. 294]. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography 1 A. L. F. Rivet, C. Smith, The Place-names of Roman Britain, 1979.

Ratae

(177 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Roman fort in Britannia, built before AD 50 at the site of an Iron-Age settlement on the present-day Soar River and held for c. 20 years. The fort and its vicus grew into the core of a prosperous town (It. Ant. 477,4; Ptol. 2,3,20: Ῥάγε/Rháge; CIL VII 1169; cf. CIL XVI 160), present-day Leicester [1. 52 f.]. Already before AD 100, R. was the main city of the Coritani or Corieltauvi [2]. The forum and the basilica were built under Hadrian (AD 117-138), the baths in c. AD 150. Parts of the baths have survived as the Jewry Wall, as…

Mons Graupius

(294 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] The Roman invasion of eastern Scotland under Iulius [II 3] Agricola brought Roman troops across the isthmus between the Forth and Clyde in AD 82 or 83 (Tac. Agr. 29,2-38,2; [1]). In contrast to the tribes of southern Scotland, the Caledonii to the north of the isthmus were very much more dangerous opponents. They were led against the Romans by Calgacus, who had probably been elected commander by the clans. He first evaded the legions, but, when the Roman advance made progress acro…

Margidunum

(184 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] On the great Roman road of the Fosse Way between Lincoln and Leicester lay various Roman settlements; one of the largest was M., near East Bridgeford, Nottinghamshire. Originally a Roman fort (late Claudian/early Neronian period), abandoned in around AD 70 [1; 2]. M. probably served as a military supply base, since the local iron ore was intensively smelted. After the end of the military occupation, the civilian settlement continued on both sides of the Fosse Way, possibly in conjunction with a mansio (or mutatio). Residential and other buildings were modest. Th…

Bremenium

(68 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] One of a line of Roman outposts north of Hadrian's Wall near the modern High Rochester. Established by Agricola (AD 77-84), the camp was renovated by Lollius Urbicus (AD 139-142), and again restored under Septimius Severus and Diocletian [1. 242-244]. CIL VII p. 178f.  Limes Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography 1 E. B. Birley, Research on Hadrian's Wall, 1961. D. J. Breeze, The Northern Frontiers of Roman Britain, 1961, 138f.

Ictis

(143 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] British island connected to the mainland at low tide where, according to Diod. Sic. 5,22,2, the inhabitants of Belerion (Land's End in south-west-Britain) sold Tin from their mines - this was the beginning of the tin trade between Britannia and the Mediterranean region. The location of I. is still under debate. Possibilities include St. Michael's Mount in Mounts Bay, Cornwall [1. 176], which is connected to the mainland at low tide, and Mount Batten in the Plymouth Sound, Devon, w…

Durovernum

(150 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | | Britannia | Britannia Modern Canterbury; arose in the form of an Iron Age oppidum on the Stour in the late 1st cent. BC. The Roman city developed shortly after AD 43, perhaps revealing the pre-Roman character of the tribes of Cantion (Kent). Public buildings were erected in the late 1st and early 2nd cents. A large theatre was added in the late 2nd cent. [1]; defensive works were built in the late 3rd cent. An extra muros Christian church, probably from the 4th cent., survived until c. AD 700 (Bede, Hist. Eccl. 1,26). A…

Magnae

(170 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] (or Magni). Roman fort on Hadrian's Wall in northern England (Not. Dign. Occ. 40,43; Geogr. Rav. 107,11), probably dating to the Flavian period (AD 69-96), modern Carvoran, identified because of epigraphical evidence ( numerus Magn(c)es(ium) [1. 1825]). In the early 2nd cent., before M. became part of the Hadrianic Limes after AD 122, it may have been part of Trajan's border line [2. 192-196]. The fort was not integrated into the vallum as was usually the case, but remained situated to the south. Under Hadrian and after him, the cohors I Hamiorum was stationed there unt…

Cantiaci

(107 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Tribe in the area of Kent and East Sussex. Its name is derived from the region of Cantium. Caes. B Gall. 5,22,1 tells of four indigenous kings; this account allows the conclusion that there were a number of sub-tribes. The tribal centre was  Durovernum, also important was Durobrivae (modern Rochester). Numerous villae were built in C. in the early Imperial Age, especially in eastern and southern Kent. In the 3rd cent.,  Rutupiae,  Dubrae, Regulbium (modern Reculver) and  Portus Lemanae (modern Lympne) were garrisons of the classis Britannica. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bib…

Dubrae

(151 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Modern Dover, was of great importance during the period of Roman occupation of  Britannia, as a port and coastal fortress. The first-rate port may well have been used during the invasion of AD 43. A fort was built in the late 2nd cent. to accommodate a unit of the classis Britannica [1]. The fort was replaced in the late 3rd cent. by a coastal fortress as protection against the Saxons. Parts of the docks and the moles have been discovered in the port area of Dover. A well preserved Roman lighthouse on East Hill, octagonal in the …

Tintagel

(81 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] A headland on the northern coast of Cornwall, for a long time connected with King Arthur and his court. Limited settlement in the late Roman period was followed by more intensive settlement from the late 5th cent. AD onwards with many imports from the eastern Mediterranean, particularly amphorae and fine pottery. At that time T. was evidently the residence of the kings of the Dumnonii. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography C. Thomas, The Book of T.: Arthur and Archaeology, 1993.

Orcades

(137 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] (Ὀρκάδες/ Orkádes, Latin Orcades). The archipelago of Orkney (today c. 70 islands, of which 24 are inhabited) off the north coast of Scotland probably first came to the attention of the ancients through Pytheas (late 4th cent. BC). According to ancient authors, there were between 30 (Mela 3,54; Ptol. 2,3,31) and 40 (Plin. HN 4,103) only sparsely inhabited islands. The fleet of Iulius [II 3] Agricola (Tac. Agr. 10) reconnoitred the O. in AD 83/4. Some of the O. were known to Ptolemy (…

Segontiaci

(35 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Celtic tribe, probably in the southeast of Britain, which surrendered to Caesar in 54 BC (Caes. Gall. 5,21). Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography A. L. F. Rivet, C. Smith, The Place-Names of Roman Britain, 1979, 453 f.

Dumnonii

(122 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] The D. lived in south-west Britannia. Their name may be derived from a pre-Roman divinity Dumnonos. During the Iron Age the D. were widely dispersed, without centres or oppida. After the Roman conquest (AD 50/65) the territory was secured by a legionary camp at Isca, later to become the capital of the tribe [1]. Settlements during the Roman period remained dispersed and un-Romanized, some small villae appearing in the vicinity of Isca. The economy was pastoral; ore was mined (e.g. tin in western Cornwall and Dartmoor, silver in eastern Cornwall [2]). Todd, Malcolm (Exet…

Isca Silurum

(154 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: | Legio | Limes | Limes | Britannia Roman legionary camp set up c. AD 74 in Britannia, modern Caerleon (South Wales). The legio II Augusta was stationed there [1; 2]. In about AD 100 the fortifications were renewed in stone, followed by the internal buildings. An amphitheatre has been excavated outside the walls of the camp and likewise wharf constructions on the banks of the Usk [3; 4]. After 300 the garrison was reduced and in the 4th cent. completely withdrawn. From the 2nd cent. an extensive vicus developed. Todd, Malcolm (Exe…

Lindum

(376 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: | Coloniae | Britannia (modern Lincoln in central England; cf. etymology L. + colonia). Town in a strategically important position where the river Witham cuts through the Lincoln Edge. Around a swampy pond in the valley floor ( lindus, Celtic ‘pond’) there was a late Iron Age settlement [1]. A legionary camp formed the core of the Roman colonia on the hills in the north. Founded in about AD 60, this fortress was kept by the legio IX Hispana until around AD 71 and then by the legio II Adiutrix until c. AD 85. With 7.2 acres this fortr…

Lactodurum

(65 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Present-day Towcester, Northamptonshire; It. Ant. 2; 6. Late Iron Age settlement; from the mid 1st cent. AD a Roman army station. The town was protected in the 2nd cent. by the construction of a rampart and ditch; stone fortifications were added in the 3rd cent. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography A. L. F. Rivet, C. Smith, The Place-Names of Roman Britain, 1979, 382f.

Verulamium

(212 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Christianity | Britannia | Britannia City above the south bank of the River Ver at modern Saint Albans to the northwest of Londinium (modern London), settlement centre since the 1st cent. BC of the Catuvellauni [1]. The settlement expanded into the valley, where after AD 43 the Romans built a fort [2]. A municipium possibly since the Flavian period (Tac. Ann. 14,33), affected by Queen Boudicca's uprising in 60/1, V. was given a forum (cf. [3]) in AD 79 or 81 and public buildings c. 100. In about 155 parts of the city…

Habitancum

(126 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Roman camp near modern Risingham (Northumberland), one of the outposts north of Hadrian's Wall in the Rede valley. Little is known about the early phases of occupation; there is no evidence that the fort was built at the same time as Hadrian's boundary wall. A camp certainly existed in the 140s; in the Severan period it was a major base for the occupation of the north. The garrison of H. was the Cohors IIII Gallorum in the 2nd cent . and the cohors I Vangionum in the 3rd cent., accompanied by a numerus exploratorum and a vexillatio Raetorum Gaesatorum. Inside the camp there is…

Tamesa

(54 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] (Tamesis). River in southeastern Britain, modern Thames (Caes. Gall. 5,11,8; Tac. Ann. 14,32; Cass. Dio 40,3,1; 60,20 f.; 62,1). At the mouth of the T., an excellent natural harbour, was Londinium (modern London). Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography M. Förster, Der Flußname Themse, 1942 A. L. F. Rivet, C. Smith, The Place-Names of Roman Britain, 1979, 466.

Camulodunum

(222 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Theatre | Caesar | Christianity | | Coloniae | Limes | Pertinax | Britannia | Britannia The largest iron age oppidum in Britannia was situated on the lower reaches of the river Colne in Essex; under the rule of kings Dubnovellaunus and  Cunobellinus [1]. C., modern Colchester, developed. In its heyday (from about AD 10 to 40), the oppidum comprised 30 km2 within a system of protective dykes. As an important centre of power, C. attracted the import of luxury goods from Gaul and Italy. A richly decorated r…

Caledonii

(196 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Ancient authors applied the name C. variously: either to the inhabitants of Scotland north of a line from the Forth to the Clyde (Tac. Agr. 25), or to a tribe in the region of the Great Glen (Ptol. 2,3,8), or to a group of tribes in northern Scotland (Cass. Dio 76,12). The reference to Caledonia in Tac. Agr. 27 and to silvae Caledoniae in Plin. HN 4,102 suggests that the C. settled across a large area of eastern Scotland. Almost unknown prior to the Roman invasion, they offered fierce resistance to it, before they were decisively defeated by…

Britannia

(1,099 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] A. Name Originally the island was known as Albion (Avien. Ora maritima 108f. probably goes back to Pytheas, c. 325 BC). In the oldest Greek sources, B. appears as Βρεταννικαὶ νῆσοι ( Bretannikaì nêsoi) and the inhabitants as Βρεττανοί ( Brettanoí, Str. 2,1,18; 2,5,12). In Latin authors the form B. is common from the 1st cent. BC (Caes. B Gall. 2,4,7ff.; 4,20ff.; 5,2ff.; Cic. Fam. 7,6ff.). The general term for the island was coined by classical authors [1]. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) [German version] B. Rome and Britannia The first contacts between B. and the Mediterra…

South Cadbury

(53 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Iron Age hill fort in Somerset, used for a short time in the middle of the 1st century AD by the Roman army. Resettled and fortified in the late 5th century. Ceramics were imported from the Mediterranean, other goods from Gaul. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography L. Alcock, Cadbury Castle, 1995.

Vinovia

(131 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] (Οὐιννοούιον/ Ouinnooúion). A Roman fort in Binchester on the important Roman road from Eboracum (modern York) to Hadrian's Wall (Ptol. 2,3,16; [1. 1036]; Limes II), where it crossed the Vedra (modern Wear), 12 km to the south of Durham. V. was founded in the Flavian period (AD 69-96) probably under Cn. Iulius [II 3] Agricola, abandoned under Hadrian, but used again in the late Antonine period and then from the 3rd cent. onwards. An extensive vicus developed outside the fort (with long narrow business premises [2. 111, 299; 3. 253]). Stones from V. were used to b…

Deva

(180 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: | Legio | Limes | Limes | Britannia Modern Chester. Legionary camp, originally set up for the legio II Adiutrix in c. AD 75 [1] as a wooden/earthen fort, with baths (stone); water pipes of lead date the completion to AD 79. The legio XX Valeria Victrix took over the camp in c. AD 86/7. The rebuilding in stone began in c. AD 102. A large amphitheatre situated outside the walls was constructed in the 2nd cent. [2]. West of the camp on the bank of the Dee is a mooring place. The fortress wall was renovated …

Magnae

(136 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[English version] (oder Magni). Röm. Kastell am Hadrians-Wall in Nordengland (Not. dign. occ. 40,43; Geogr. Rav. 107,11) wohl aus flavischer Zeit (69-96 n.Chr.), h. Carvoran, inschr. lokalisiert ( numerus Magn(c)es(ium) [1. 1825]), evtl. Teil der traianischen Grenzlinie im frühen 2. Jh., bevor M. nach 122 n.Chr. in den hadrianischen Limes eingefügt wurde [2. 192-196]. Ausnahmsweise wurde das Kastell nicht in das vallum eingegliedert, sondern verblieb südl. davon. Unter Hadrianus und später war die cohors I Hamiorum hier stationiert, bis zum 3. Jh. durch die cohors II Delmat…

Britannia

(1,016 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[English version] A. Name Urspr. war die Insel unter dem Namen Albion geläufig (Avien. ora maritima 108f. geht wohl auf Pytheas, ca. 325 v.Chr. zurück). In den ältesten griech. Quellen erscheint B. als Βρεταννικαὶ νῆσοι ( Bretannikaí nḗsoi), die Einwohner als Βρεττανοί ( Brettanoí, Strab. 2,1,18; 2,5,12). Bei lat. Autoren ist die Form B. seit dem 1.Jh. v.Chr. üblich (Caes. Gall. 2,4,7ff.; 4,20ff.; 5,2ff.; Cic. fam. 7,6ff.). Der Oberbegriff für die Insel ist eine Schöpfung klass. Autoren [1]. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) [English version] B. Rom und Britannia Die ersten Kontakte zw. B.…

Lactodurum

(47 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[English version] (h. Towcester/Northamptonshire; Itin. Anton. 2; 6). Späteisenzeitliche Ansiedlung; seit Mitte 1. Jh.n.Chr. eine röm. Militärstation. Die Stadt war im 2. Jh. mit Wall und Graben, im 3. Jh. durch eine Steinbefestigung gesichert. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography A.L.F. Rivet, C. Smith, The Place-Names of Roman Britain, 1979, 382f.

Habitancum

(113 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[English version] Römisches Lager beim h. Risingham (Northumberland), einer der Vorposten nördl. des Hadrianswalls im Tal des Rede. Die frühen Phasen der Besetzung liegen im Dunkeln; es gibt keinen Beweis dafür, daß das Fort zur selben Zeit wie der hadrianische Grenzwall gebaut wurde. Ein Lager existierte sicher in den 140er J.; in severischer Zeit war es ein Hauptstützpunkt der Besetzung des Nordens. Die Garnison von H. war im 2. Jh. die cohors IIII Gallorum, im 3. Jh. die cohors I Vangionum, begleitet von einem numerus exploratorum und einer vexillatio Raetorum Gaesatorum. Im Inn…

Catuvellauni

(81 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[English version] Mächtiger Stamm in Britannia nördl. der unteren Themse, der mit den gallischen Catualauni in Verbindung gestanden haben dürfte. Seine einflußreichsten Fürsten waren Tasciovanus und sein Sohn Cunobellinus [1]. Nach der Eroberung von Britannia durch Claudius (Cass. Dio 60,20,2) wurden die C. als eine civitas mit dem Zentrum Verulamium organisiert (Tac. ann. 14,33). Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography 1 S.S. Frere, Britannia, 31987, 44f. S.S. Frere, Verulamium Excavations 1, 1972  R.E.M. und T.V. Wheeler, Verulamium, 1936  K. Branigan, The C., 1985.

Corstopitum

(100 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[English version] Ortschaft im Tal des North Tyne, h. Corbridge. Während der Eroberung durch Agricola (77-84 n.Chr.) wurde hier ein großer Stützpunkt errichtet, den anschließend ein Lager weiter östl. ersetzte (ca. 125 durch Feuer zerstört). Nach der Errichtung des Hadrianswalls 7 km nördl. wurde C. zur Versorgungsbasis ausgebaut. C. spielte im frühen 3. Jh. eine bed. Rolle im Zusammenhang mit den Feldzügen des Septimius Severus. An den Stützpunkt angrenzend, entstand im 3. und 4. Jh. hier eine bed. Stadt [1]. Limes; Britannia Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography 1 M.Bishop, J.N. …

Cassi

(50 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] One of five tribes in Britannia, who surrendered to Caesar in 54 BC (Caes. B Gall. 5,21). Their settlement area, which cannot be localized exactly, was in the south-east of the island. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography A. L. F. Rivet, C. Smith, The Place-names of Roman Britain, 1979, 302.

Glannaventa

(74 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] (probably modern Ravenglass/Cumbria). The camp was laid out at the beginning of Hadrian's rule at an anchorage at the river (not excavated); especially striking is a bathhouse outside the walls; the building's walls with windows 3.5 metres high are still extant. G. was likely abandoned in the late 4th cent. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography E. Birley, The Roman Fort at Ravenglass (Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Archaeological Society 58), 1958, 14-30.

Picti

(162 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Tribe beyond the northern frontier of the Roman province of Britannia, first mentioned in connection with the events of AD 297 (Laterculus Veronensis 13; Pan. Lat. 8,11,4). Constantius [1] I campaigned against them in AD 306, but from the mid-4th cent. they subjected the province to repeated attack (Amm. Marc. 20,1; 26,4,5; 27,8,20). Their territory lay in eastern Scotland, north of the Firth of Forth (cf. the etymology of various place names). Little is known of their settlements…

Rutupiae

(242 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Harbour town in far southeastern Britannia, modern Richborough (Kent), on the now silted-up channel between the island of Tonatis (modern Isle of Thanet) and the mainland of Kent [1]. The settlement, captured by the invading army of the emperor Claudius [III 1] in AD 43, was used as a central military supply base until the late 1st cent. AD. Between AD 80 and 90, a triumphal arch was erected here, probably to celebrate the northern conquests of the Flavian governors [1. 40-73]. Th…

Ordovices

(114 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] British tribe who inhabited the region between Snowdonia and the Severn valley (Ptol. 2,3,18); a site of principal settlement is unknown. They opposed the Roman invasion under Nero (AD 50), but were defeated by Julius Frontinus and Julius [II 3] Agricola between AD 74 and AD 79 (Tac. Ann. 12,33). According to Tac. Agr. 18,2, they were annihilated by Agricola. Nevertheless their name survives: e.g. in Dinorwig and Rhyd Orddwy (Wales). Britannia (with map: the indigenous tribes) Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography M.G. Jarrett, J.C. Mann, The Tribes of Wales, in: W…

Calleva Atrebatum

(135 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: | Britannia | Britannia (modern Silchester). An Iron Age oppidum, main centre of the Atrebates [2], it developed from 100 BC into a significant political centre. Through its links with  Commius, the settlement boomed in the mid 1st cent. BC. It is likely that, after AD 43, Calleva Atrebatum (CA) was incorporated into Cogidubnus' empire. The early Roman town was established within the Iron Age fortifications [1]. From its very beginnings, CA's developmen…

Mamucium

(101 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Roman fort near Manchester, on the road from Deva to Eboracum, first occupied in the Flavian period (AD 69-96), probably under Cn. Iulius [II 3] Agricola. Renovated in the early 2nd cent. [1]. An inscription on a Severan building suggests a further extension in the 3rd cent. [2. 581]. In the 4th cent., M. gained considerable strategic importance, before being abandoned after AD 370. A large vicus surrounded the fort. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography 1 G. D. B. Jones, S. Grealey, Roman Manchester, 1974 2 R. G. Collingwood, R. P. Wight, The Roman Inscriptions of Brita…

Vindolanda

(108 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Roman fort about 40 km to the west of Newcastle upon Tyne, modern Chesterholm, founded in the Flavian period (AD 69-96) [1]. The fort was renovated under Hadrian; Hadrian's Wall runs 3 km to the north of it (Limes II, with map). The fort was also renovated a century later. A large vicus developed to the west of it in the 2nd and 3rd cents. [2. 1700; 3]. The most significant find from V. is the Vindolanda Writing Tablets. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography 1 P. Bidwell, The Roman Fort of V. at Chesterholm, 1985 2 R. G. Collingwood, R. P. Wright, The Roman Inscriptions …

Cattiterides

(271 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] (Καττιτερίδες; Kattiterídes, ‘tin islands’). The C. were probably the regions and islands of the Atlantic coast of both Gaul and Britain; C. also generally referred to the south-west of Britain and the offshore islands. Most ancient authors had but little specific knowledge of this region. Thus Pliny reports that the Greek Midacritus was the first to import tin from the island of Cassiteris ( Midacritus, Plin. HN 7,197), without providing exact topographical details. Hdt. 3,115 doubted the very existence of these tin islands, probably because …

Corstopitum

(109 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] Settlement in the valley of the North Tyne, modern Corbridge. During the conquest by Agricola (AD 77-84) a large base was erected here, subsequently replaced by a camp further to the east (destroyed by fire c. 125). After Hadrian's Wall was erected 7 km to the north, C. was extended to become a supply base. In the early 3rd cent. C. played a decisive role in connection with the campaigns of Septimius Severus. An important city adjoining the base arose here in the 3rd and 4th cents. [1].  Limes;  Britannia Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography 1 M. Bishop, J. N. Dore, Corbridg…

Sutton Hoo

(77 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[German version] In one of the burial mounds at SH near Woodbridge in Suffolk a wooden ship was found with a rich treasure (Gaulish, Scandinavian and Eastern English goods, Byzantine silver bowls, including one with the stamp of Anastasius [1] I, also Frankish coins of the period around AD 625). It is presumably the tomb of Rædwald (6th/7th cent. AD), a king of East Anglia. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography R. Bruce-Mitford, The S. H. Ship-Burial, 3 vols., 1975-1983.

Hibernia

(678 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
(Ireland). [German version] A. Ancient knowledge Ancient geographers report little of the north-west coasts of Europe and the islands off this coast. The first knowledge regarding the island of Ireland, Ierne or H. was probably only obtained during the exploratory journey of Pytheas ( c. 320 BC [1; 2]). Pytheas probably did not visit H. himself and his reports were only second-hand, but Strabo, Diodorus and Mela probably had access to his information (Str. 4,5,4; Diod. Sic. 5,32; Mela 3,6). Some elements of this tradition are pure fantasy…

Kattiterides

(238 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[English version] (Καττιτερίδες, die “Zinninseln”). Mit K. waren wohl Gebiete und Inseln an den gallischen und südwestbritannischen Atlantikküsten gemeint; K. bezog man aber im allg. auf den britannischen SW und die vorgelagerten Inseln. Die meisten ant. Autoren hatten nur ungenaue Kenntnisse von dieser Gegend. So berichtet Plinius, daß der Grieche Midakritos als erster Zinn von der Insel Cassiteris importiert habe ( Midacritus, Plin. nat. 7,197), ohne genauere top. Angaben zu machen. Hdt. 3,115 bezweifelt die Existenz der Zinn-Inseln überhaupt, wohl weil…

Glannaventa

(71 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[English version] (h. wohl Ravenglass/Cumbria). Das Lager wurde zu Anf. der Herrschaft des Hadrianus an einem Ankerplatz am Fluß angelegt (nicht ausgegraben); bes. auffallend ist ein außerhalb der Mauern gelegenes Badehaus, von dem noch Mauern mit Fensteröffnungen 3,5 m hoch anstehen. G. wurde wohl im späten 4. Jh. aufgegeben. Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography E. Birley, The Roman Fort at Ravenglass (Transactions of the Cumberland and Westmorland Archaeological Society 58), 1958, 14-30.

Luguvallium

(259 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[English version] Die röm. Militäreinrichtungen und die Stadt L., h. Carlisle, bilden einen der wichtigsten Komplexe an der Nordgrenze von Britannia. Die meisten Phasen in der Gesch. von L. sind schlecht dokumentiert, und viele der jüngsten Ausgrabungen sind noch nicht veröffentlicht. Die früheste röm. Einrichtung ist ein Kastell am Übergang über den Fluß Eden (wohl 78/9 n.Chr.) [1; 5]. Dieses wurde bis kurz nach 100 n.Chr. gehalten, danach niedergerissen und an anderer Stelle ersetzt (bis 160 n.C…

Londinium

(676 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[English version] Dieser Ort ist auf folgenden Karten verzeichnet: Britannia | Caesar | Christentum | Handel | Limes | Roma | Roma | Straßen (h. London). Die röm. Stadt L. - der Name enthält evtl. den kelt. PN Londinos - lag, wohl ohne vorröm. Vorläufer, an der geeignetsten Übergangsstelle über den Tamesis (Themse), welche die Aufmerksamkeit der Römer z.Z. der Invasion 43 n.Chr. auf sich zog. Die frühe Siedlung lag auf Anhöhen beiderseits des sumpfigen Tals des von Norden in den Tamesis einmündenden Walbrook. Hier konn…

Cilurnum

(107 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[English version] Röm. Lager am Westufer des North Tyne, wo der Hadrianswall den Fluß kreuzt, h. Chesters; ca. 125 n.Chr. an der Stelle des Turms 27a errichtet [1. 89-91]. Hier war im 3.Jh. n.Chr. die ala II Asturum stationiert (CIL VII 585); zuvor könnte hier Reiterei untergebracht gewesen sein (auch Sarmatae). Erh. sind die Lagertore, principia, praetorium, zwei Mannschaftsgebäude, Thermen außerhalb der Mauern und die Fundamente einer Brücke. Südl. des Lagers lag ein ausgedehnter vicus [2]. Limes Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) Bibliography 1 D.J. Breeze, The Northern Frontiers of …

Mons Graupius

(276 words)

Author(s): Todd, Malcolm (Exeter)
[English version] Die röm. Invasion in Ost-Schottland unter Iulius [II 3] Agricola führte 82 oder 83 n.Chr. röm. Truppen über den Isthmus von Forth und Clyde hinaus (Tac. Agr. 29,2-38,2; [1]). Im Gegensatz zu den Volksstämmen im südl. Schottland waren die Caledonii nördl. des Isthmus sehr viel gefährlichere Gegner. Sie wurden von Calgacus, der wohl von den Clans zum Anführer gewählt worden war, gegen die Römer geführt. Zuerst wich er den Legionen aus; als aber der röm. Vormarsch durch die Küsteneb…
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