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Maximianus

(1,672 words)

Author(s): Bleckmann, Bruno (Strasbourg) | Nauerth, Claudia (Heidelberg) | Stroh, Wilfried (Munich)
[German version] [1] M. Aurelius Valerius M. Herculius Roman emperor, 286-305 AD Roman emperor, AD 286-305 or 310; on 13 December 285 (?) proclaimed Caesar by Diocletianus and employed in the fight against the Bagaudae (Eutr. 9,22,1; Pan. Lat. 7,8,3); after proving himself he was proclaimed Augustus on 1 April (Chron. Min. I, p. 229 f.) or 1 May 286 (cf. [1. 22]). Diocletian received him as a brother in his family, with M. acquiring the epithet Herculius while Diocletian became Iovius ( Tetrarchy). As Augustus, M. continued military operations in the western part of the empire,…

Cornelius

(14,783 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Eder, Walter (Berlin) | Frateantonio, Christa (Gießen) | Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Stroh, Wilfried (Munich) | Et al.
Name of one of the oldest and most celebrated Roman patrician families; during the Roman Republic the largest and most extensive gens, giving its name to the tribus Cornelia. Its patrician branches probably stem from the Maluginenses, frequently attested in the 5th cent. BC (C. [I 57-58]); the sequence was probably as follows: in the 5th cent. the Cossi [I 20-22]; in the 4th cent. the Scipiones [I 65-85], Rufini [I 62] and Lentuli [I 31-56]; from the 3rd cent. the Dolabellae [I 23-29], Sullae [I 87-90], Blasiones [I 8-10],…

Living Latin

(3,362 words)

Author(s): Stroh, Wilfried (Munich)
Stroh, Wilfried (Munich) [German version] A. Living Latin: The Concept (CT) Although Latin, in a linguistic sense, died 2000 years ago in that it stopped developing at least in its morphology and syntax, it was the leading language in European literature until the late 17th cent. [19 vol. I.471 f., 607]. Since that time it has occasionally been regarded -although not unanimously - as dead [30. 199; 28. 272].  Although, in the course of the 18th cent. due to the rise of modern nationalism, it lost its statu…