Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)" )' returned 65 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Gaesati

(166 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] According to Polybius (Pol. 2,22,1; 2,34), the G. were a Gallic tribe, living in the Alps and along the Rhône; G. went into service as mercenaries, hence their name (Pol. 2,22,1). They took part in the Gallic invasion of Italy in 225 BC, but were beaten off, and subsequently defeated in 222 BC. Gaesum is also the name of a Gallic spear (Caes. B Gall. 3,4), sometimes carried by lightly armed Roman troops (Liv. 8,8,5). In the early Principate, auxiliary troops recruited from Raetia and apparently equipped with this kind of spear were referred to as gaesati. They were stationed…

Praetorium

(247 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] The praetorium  was the tent of the commanding officer of a Roman army in the Republic. The term betrays the fact that the praetor was originally the supreme Roman commander. Once camp was reached on the march, the location of the praetorium was first decided (Pol. 6,27; cf. Caes. B Civ. 1,76,2); it occupied centre stage in the camp (Castra) and was flanked by an open square serving as the market and by the tent of the quaestor . The via praetoria and the porta praetoria were probably the street and gate adjoining the praetorium. The word praetorium also denoted the advisory m…

Discens

(128 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] In a military context, this term denotes a soldier who has received special training for a certain special tasks or roles. There is epigraphical evidence that among soldiers serving in a legion were some who had received special training to prepare them for service as cavalry (CIL VIII 2882 = ILS 2331), medical orderlies, architects, or to act as standard or eagle bearers ( discens aquiliferu(m) leg(ionis) III Aug(ustae), CIL VIII 2988 = ILS 2344). It is not clear whether the discentes were of the same rank and standing as the immunes, i.e. soldiers who had special resp…

Equites singulares

(708 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] From the 2nd cent. BC at the latest, Roman commanders had an elite unit composed of mounted troops and foot soldiers, its members drawn from the contingents of the Italian socii, as was the case with the   extraordinarii . Towards the end of the Republic the elite units were recruited from the   auxilia ; it is unknown whether these, too, had a particular name. Similar units appear to have existed at the beginning of the Principate. During the German campaign of Germanicus (AD 11-14), Fabricius Tuscus commanded an ala praetoria, by which is probably meant the commander'…

Auxilia

(519 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] During the last two centuries of the Republic, Rome forcibly recruited or enlisted as mercenaries members of non-Italian peoples with particular military skills e.g. Cretan archers, slingers from the Balearics and horsemen from Numidia, Spain or Gaul. After the Battle of Actium, many of these units remained in the service of Rome either voluntarily or as bound by contract, whilst others went on to serve under their own military leaders in their native country or in its vicinity. A…

Praetorians

(876 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] ( cohortes praetoriae). In the Roman Republic, the cohors praetoria was a small military unit which guarded the praetorium and acted as an escort for the commander. According to Festus (Fest. 223M.), Cornelius [I 71] Scipio Africanus was the first to have selected 'the bravest' for his protection. Freed from other duties, they also drew higher pay. In the late Republic, powerful commanders had strong bodyguards; thus in 44 BC, M. Antonius [I 9] assembled a bodyguard of 6,000 from his veterans. In 27 BC, Augustus [1] created a standing corps of praetorians who…

Singulares

(73 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] were Roman soldiers specially selected to serve as aides or orderlies to high-ranking officers (P. Oxy. 7.1022; CIL III 7334). Singulares are found serving in the officia of the praefectus praetorio , the tribunes of the praetorian and urban cohorts, senatorial military tribunes, and the cavalry prefects. The singularis of the praetorian prefect ranked below the tesserarius and belonged to the principales . Equites singulares Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)

Kataphraktoi

(353 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] (κατάφρακτοι; katáphraktoi). The term kataphraktoi refers to the armoured cavalry, which was first encountered by the Romans in 190 BC, in the war against Antiochus III (Liv. 37,40,5). At Carrhae, the army of Crassus was defeated, in 53 BC, by the Parthian cavalry whose men and horses were armoured (Plut. Crassus 24f.). From AD 69 on, the Romans were confronted with the armoured cavalry of the Sarmatians on the lower Danube (Tac. Hist. 1,79). In the Roman army, the first unit of armoured cavalrymen was probably deployed by Hadrian ( ala I Gallorum et Pannoniorum catafr…

Cohors

(498 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] During early Republican times, the  allies placed units of 500 men under the command of the Roman army, which were later called cohortes and came under the command of a prefect of the relevant town. It remains unclear when the cohortes were integrated into the army as tactical units. Polybius called a cohort a unit consisting of three  maniples (Pol. 11,23; Battle of Ilipa 206 BC), but in his famous description of the Roman army, cohortes are not mentioned. Livy mentions cohortes in his representation of the campaigns in Spain during the 2nd cent. BC, sometime…

Legio

(5,549 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] A. Republic In early times, the Roman military contingent probably consisted of 3,000 soldiers in total, each of the three tribus of the royal era providing 1,000 men (Varro, Ling. 5,89) - a military force described as ‘the levy’ ( legio). The division of the Roman people into six classes of wealth, ascribed by historiographical tradition to Servius Tullius (Liv. 1,42,4-43,13; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 4,15-18) also had a military purpose: a citizen's assets dictated with which weapons he was to equip himself. Those without property ( capite censi) were excluded from mili…

Bucellarii

(172 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] In late antiquity, bucellarii described groups of barbarian soldiers in the service of respected warriors, who from time to time deployed them in the interest of Rome. Eventually, the term bucellarii developed a particular meaning: an armed retinue, who served large landowners as bodyguards, a practice which -- despite being banned by Leo -- was frequently encountered. Bucellarii could also be found around high-ranking officials, mostly officers; they swore an oath of allegiance to both their lord and the emperor, which seems to indicat…

Exploratores

(303 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] Exploratores were the scouts of the Roman army. They reconnoitred the movements and deployments of the enemy as well as the terrain and positions of camps. In the early years of the Principate, soldiers selected from the   auxilia were commandeered from their units for a certain length of time to act as scouts. In the Dacian War (AD 105-106), Ti. Claudius Maximus, then serving in an ala, was selected by Trajan himself as a scout and brought the princeps the head of King Decebalus. In the mid 2nd cent. there is evidence of small reconnaissance units called explorationes. They w…

Aerarium militare

(577 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] Since the Roman senate in the Republican Period was unwilling to support the soldiers after they left the army with provisions of land or money ( praemia), certain commanders took care of it on their own account. This contributed to the development of armies that owed personal allegiance to an individual leader and helped to undermine political stability, beginning with the dictatorship of Cornelius [I 90] Sulla. When the younger Augustus (C. Octavius) established himself against his adversaries in the civ…

Principales

(383 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] The principales of the Roman legions were soldiers who performed special duties, for this were exempted from the usual camp service and received one and a half times or double the pay of common soldiers (Veg. Mil. 2,7); the immunes on the other hand received no increased pay. The  enhanced standing of a principalis is illustrated in a letter by Iulius Appollinaris, a Roman soldier in Egypt: “I give thanks to Serapis and good fortune that while others are working hard all day cutting stones, I am now a principalis and stand around do…

Manipulus

(242 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] The manipulus (maniple) was a tactical unit of the Roman legion introduced in the 4th cent. BC (Liv. 8,8,3: et quod antea phalanges similes Macedonicis, hoc postea manipulatim structa acies coepit esse). It enabled troops to be more flexibly deployed for battle than with the phalanx. Soldiers armed with the pilum (throwing spear) were given more room. The legion was deployed for battle in three ranks ( hastati, principes, triarii ), each of the first two ranks comprising ten manipuli, each of 120 men, while the rank of the triarii comprised ten manipuli, each of 60 men. …

Extraordinarii

(237 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] The extraordinarii were soldiers from allied Italian cities, serving in the army of early Rome as elite units of infantry and cavalry. Twelve prefects appointed by the consuls selected the best soldiers from the contingents of the alliance ─ around a third of the cavalry and a fifth of the infantry ─ in order to make up the extraordinarii (Pol. 6,26,6). Some extraordinarii were entrusted with the special task of accompanying the consuls and acting as their bodyguard. They also took part in battles as regular troops; in 209 BC they fought und…

Numerus

(234 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] In the Roman army, generally, a number of soldiers or specifically, a military unit; as the word lacked a precise definition, it could be used of either the auxilia or of the legions (Tac. Agr. 18,2; CIL III 12257: cohors Lusitanorum). Units lacking their own name were those referred to as numeri, e.g. the equites singulares Augusti (ILS 2182-2184; 2129) or the exploratores (ILS 2631; 2632; 9186; 9187). The same applied to units which had been recruited at the frontiers of the Empire: these numeri were often named after their place of origin (cf. e.g. the numeri Palmyrenorum, stationed in Africa; CIL VIII 2505; 2515). The formation of units whose soldiers were of the same ethnic origin probably began in the 1st cent. AD and continued thereafter. The use of the imprecise term numeri for different units does not imply that these units were of the same status or organisation or that they fought in the same way. The phrase in nu…

Optio

(367 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] In the army of the Roman Republic an optio served under each of the two centuriones of a manipulus . The word derives from the fact that the optio was originally selected by a centurio ( optare, 'choose', 'wish for'; Festus p. 184M; cf. Veg. Mil. 2,7,4). In the Principate, an optio or optio centuriae (ILS 2116) was among the principales in the legiones, who received either pay and a half or double pay (Soldiers' pay) and performed special duties. An optio was ranked between the tesserarius and the signifer (Ensign bearer); he was also under the centu…

Comitatenses

(471 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] The comitatenses were the units that constituted the mobile army of the late Roman Empire. Their name derives from the comitatus, the administrative machine that served the princeps and accompanied him on his travels. The comitatenses were not tied to any specific territorium, and could be joined to territorial troo…

Mutiny

(1,285 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
( seditio militum). [German version] I. Military Service and Discipline The discipline of the Roman army impressed even non-Roman authors such as Polybius and Flavius Iosephus [4]. They praised the superiority of Roman soldiers, which was achieved by focused training, so that they ‘ruled almost the entire world because of their physical strength and courage ’ (Ios. BI 2,580). However, …

Riparienses milites

(195 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] RM are first mentioned (in the form ripenses) in a decision of Constantine I in AD 325 (Cod. Theod. 7,20,4), where they are distinguished from the comitatenses , the field army. Ripenses ranked just below the comitatenses, but above the soldiers of the alae and cohorts, who made up the auxiliary troops (Auxilia). They obtained exemption from the poll tax for themselves and their wives after twenty-four years' service, but were less privileged than the comitatenses in the case of a medical discharge. It is possible that the ripenses or RM (Cod. Theod. 7,1,18; 7,4,14) were originally employed on or adjacent to a riverbank (Lat. ripa) in a frontier area. The Notitia dignitatum mentions legiones riparienses on the Danube (Not. Dign. Or. 39 f.), and several Roman provinces in the west are described as ripe…

Limitanei

(705 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] General designation for the units of the late Roman army that had fixed garrisons in the border regions ( limites; see limes ) of the Roman Empire. They were under the command of a dux limitis, who was respon…

Centurio

(374 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] With the exception of the senator…

Evocati

(394 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] In the 2nd cent. BC, Roman soldiers had to serve in the military for up to six years, followed by a further 16 years, during which as evocati they had to be available to be called up again. During the civil wars in the final years of the Roman Republic, military leaders frequently tried to talk experienced soldiers into returning to their units. Troops recruited in that manner were referred to as evocati. In rank, evocati stood abov…

Recruits, training of

(845 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] I. Greece See Ephebeia. Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast) [German version] …

Primipilus

(408 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] In the Republican Period a centurio primi pili, later described as primipilus or primus pilus, was the highest ranking centurio in a Roman legion. He was in command of the outmost manipulus of the triarii or pilani on the right flank. Normally he was a member of the general's c onsilium and like other centuriones had served several years as a soldier. As legions were originally recruited year by year, a p. served only for one year and was then a simple centurio again; a p. could hold the position several times, however. In 171 BC Spurius Ligustinus reports that du…

Contarii

(109 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] were auxiliary cavalrymen armed with a heavy lance ( contus) about 3.5m long. They held the lance across the withers of the horse, with both hands either on top of or underneath the lance, and were thus not protected by a shield. This lance was probably adopted from the Sarmatians. From the time of Trajan or Hadrian there were separate units of C., as for example the ala I Ulpia contariorum milliaria. Although the C. initial…

Iuniores

(218 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] Under the centuriation system, which the historiographical tradition ascribed to king Servius Tullius, the Roman people were divided into classes according to the wealth of individual citizens. It was simultaneously used for political and military purposes. Each class consisted of two groups of citizens: the iuniores (men of 17-46 years), who had to perform military service and fight where and whenever it was demanded of them, whereas it was the duty of the seniores (men of 46-60 years) to defend the town itself against attacks (Pol. 6,19,2; Liv. 1,43,1f.: seniores ad…

Rekrutenausbildung

(880 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] I. Griechenland s. Ephebeia Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast) [English version] II. Rom ‘Seht Euch die Ausbildung der Legionen ( exercitatio legionum) an ... Daher rührt der Mut in der Schlacht und die Bereitschaft, Wunden zu empfangen.’ Cicero bringt hier den traditionellen Stolz der Römer auf ihre mil. Ausbildung zum Ausdruck (Cic. Tusc. 2,37). In der frühen röm. Republik fand die elementare mil. Ausbildung wahrscheinlich auf dem Campus Martius statt. Als später Bürger rekrutiert wurden, die weit entfe…

Principales

(336 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] Die p. der röm. Legionen waren Soldaten, die eine bes. Dienstaufgabe erfüllten, dafür vom üblichen Lagerdienst befreit waren und den eineinhalbfachen oder doppelten Sold einfacher Soldaten erhielten (Veg. mil. 2,7); die immunes hingegen erhielten keinen erhöhten Sold. Die herausgehobene Stellung eines principalis verdeutlicht ein Brief von Iulius Appollinaris, einem röm. Soldaten in Äg.: ‘Ich danke Serapis und dem guten Glück dafür, daß ich, während alle anderen hart arbeiten und Steine hauen, nun p. bin, herumstehe und nichts tue’ (PMichigan VIII 46…

Contarii

(110 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] waren mit einer schweren, etwa 3,5m langen Lanze ( contus) bewaffnete Reiter der Auxiliartruppen. Sie hielten die Lanze quer über dem Widerrist des Pferdes entweder von unten oder von oben in beiden Händen, wobei sie nicht von einem Schild geschützt waren. Diese Lanze ist wahrscheinlich von den Sarmaten übernommen worden. Seit der Zeit des Traianus oder des Hadrianus gab es eigene Einheiten der c., wie beispielsweise die ala I Ulpia contariorum milliaria. Obwohl die c. zunächst keine schwere Rüstung trugen, haben sie wohl zur Entwicklung der gepanzerte…

Cohors

(468 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] Während der frühen Republik unterstellten die Bundesgenossen der röm. Armee 500 Mann starke Einheiten, die später cohortes genannt wurden und dem Befehl eines Praefekten aus der betreffenden Stadt unterstanden. Es bleibt unklar, wann die c. als taktische Einheit in das Heer integriert wurde. Polybios bezeichnet eine c. als eine aus drei Manipeln bestehende Einheit (Pol. 11,23; Schlacht von Ilipa 206 v.Chr.), in seiner berühmten Beschreibung des röm. Heeres werden jedoch die c. nicht erwähnt. Livius erwähnt in seiner Darstellung der Feldzüge in Spani…

Meuterei

(1,289 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
( seditio militum). [English version] I. Militärdienst und Disziplin Die Disziplin der röm. Armee hat selbst Autoren wie Polybios und Flavios Iosephos [4], die nicht aus Rom stammten, beeindruckt; sie rühmten die durch eine gezielte Ausbildung erreichte Überlegenheit der röm. Soldaten, ‘die durch ihre Körperkraft und ihren Mut nahezu die gesamte Welt beherrschten’ (Ios. bell. Iud. 2,580). In der frühen Republik bestand das röm. Heer allerdings aus dem Aufgebot der Bürger, die ein bestimmtes Vermögen nach…

Bucellarii

(153 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] In der Spätant. bezeichneten b. Gruppen barbarischer Soldaten, die angesehenen Kriegern dienten und von diesen bisweilen im Interesse Roms eingesetzt wurden. Schließlich bekam der Begriff b. eine spezielle Bedeutung: bewaffnete Gefolgsleute, die reichen Großgrundbesitzern als Leibwache dienten, eine Praxis, die trotz des Verbots durch Leo häufig anzutreffen war. Auch findet man b. in der Umgebung von hohen Beamten, zumeist Offizieren; sie schworen ihrem Herrn und dem Kaiser einen Treueid, was auf eine offizielle Billigung hinzuwe…

Kataphraktoi

(322 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] (κατάφρακτοι). Der Begriff k. bezeichnete die gepanzerte Reiterei, mit der die Römer zuerst im Jahre 190 v.Chr. im Krieg gegen Antiochos III. konfrontiert wurden (Liv. 37,40,5). Bei Carrhae wurde das Heer des Crassus 53 v.Chr. von der parth. Reiterei, deren Reiter und Pferde gepanzert waren, besiegt (Plut. Crassus 24f.). Seit 69 n.Chr. hatten die Römer mit der gepanzerten Reiterei der Sarmaten an der unteren Donau zu tun (Tac. hist. 1,79). Im röm. Heer wurde die erste Einheit von gepanzerten Reitern wahrscheinlich unter Hadrianus aufgestellt ( ala I Gallorum et …

Praetorium

(216 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] Das p. war während der Republik das Zelt des Befehlshabers einer röm. Armee; der Begriff zeigt, daß der Praetor urspr. der röm. Oberbefehlshaber war. Wenn ein Marschlager errichtet wurde, bestimmte man zunächst den Platz für das p. (Pol. 6,27; vgl. Caes. civ. 1,76,2); es nahm die zentrale Stelle des Lagers ( castra ) ein und wurde von einem offenen Platz für den Markt und vom Zelt des Quaestors flankiert. Die via praetoria und die porta praetoria waren wahrscheinlich Straße und Tor, die dem p. benachbart waren. Das Wort p. bezeichnete auch die Beratung der Offiziere…

Limitanei

(653 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] Allg. Bezeichnung für die Einheiten des spätröm. Heeres, die einen festen Standort in den Grenzgebieten ( limites; s. limes ) des Imperium Romanum hatten. Sie standen unter dem Kommando eines dux limitis, der die Verantwortung für einen Teilabschnitt der Grenze trug, der sich oft über mehrere Territorialprov. erstreckte. Der Begriff l. ist erstmals 363 n.Chr. in einem offiziellen Dokument bezeugt (Cod. Theod. 12,1,56); er wurde verwendet, um die territorialen Truppen von den Soldaten des Feldheeres ( comitatenses ), das an kein bestimmt…

Gaesati

(155 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] Nach Polybios (Pol. 2,22,1; 2,34) waren die G. ein gallischer Stamm, der in den Alpen und an der Rhône lebte; die G. verdingten sich als Söldner, worauf ihr Name zurückzuführen ist (Pol. 2,22,1). Sie nahmen an der gallischen Invasion in Italien 225 v.Chr. teil, wurden jedoch zurückgeschlagen und schließlich 222 v.Chr. erneut besiegt. Gaesum bezeichnete auch einen gallischen Wurfspieß (Caes. Gall. 3,4), den manchmal leichtbewaffnete röm. Truppen trugen (Liv. 8,8,5). Im frühen Pinzipat nannte man Auxiliartruppen, die in Raetia ausgeh…

Extraordinarii

(229 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] Die e. waren Soldaten aus verbündeten ital. Städten; sie dienten im frühen röm. Heer als Eliteeinheiten von Fußtruppen und Reiterei. Zwölf von den consules ernannte Präfekten wählten die besten Soldaten aus den Kontingenten der Bundesgenossen - etwa ein Drittel der Reiterei und ein Fünftel der Fußtruppen - aus, um so die e. zu bilden (Pol. 6,26,6). Einige e. hatten die wichtige Aufgabe, die consules zu begleiten und als deren Leibwache zu fungieren. Sie nahmen allerdings auch als reguläre Truppen an Schlachten teil; so kämpften sie 209 v.Chr…

Centurio

(350 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] Der c. war abgesehen von den Senatoren und den equites der wichtigste Offizier in der röm. Armee. Im 1.Jh. v.Chr. gab es in einer Cohorte ( cohors ) sechs c., die jeweils eine centuria von 80 Mann befehligten und Titel trugen, die die alte Manipelordnung widerspiegelten: pilus prior, pilus posterior, princeps prior, princeps posterior, hastatus prior, hastatus posterior. Spätestens seit der flavischen Zeit befanden sich nur fünf c. in der ersten Cohorte, die jedoch die ranghöchsten in der Legion waren ( primi ordines), wobei es vier Beförderungsschritte zur Po…

Exploratores

(287 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] E. waren die Späher des röm. Heeres. Sie kundschafteten die Bewegungen und Aufstellungen des Feindes ebenso wie das Gelände und Positionen von Lagern aus. Im frühen Prinzipat wurden ausgesuchte Soldaten der auxilia von ihren Einheiten für eine bestimmte Zeit abkommandiert und fungierten als Späher. Im Dakischen Krieg (105-106 n.Chr.) wurde Ti. Claudius Maximus, der damals in einer ala diente, von Traianus selbst als Späher ausgesucht und brachte dem princeps den Kopf des Königs Decebalus. Für die Mitte des 2. Jh. sind kleine Aufklärungseinheiten, die exploratio…

Comitatenses

(458 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] Die c. waren die Einheiten, die das Feldheer des spätant. röm. Reiches ausmachten. Ihr Name leitet sich von dem comitatus ab, dem Verwaltungsapparat, der dem Princeps diente und ihn auf seinen Reisen begleitete. Die c. waren an kein bestimmtes Territorium gebunden und konnten Territorialtruppen, die ständig in bestimmten Prov. standen ( limitanei oder ripenses), zugefügt werden. Es ist wahrscheinlich, daß Diocletianus ein Feldheer aufgestellt hat, das allerdings nur eine begrenzte Größe hatte. Doch Constantinus vergrößerte die c. und verlieh ihnen eine n…

Primipilus

(377 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] In republikanischer Zeit war der centurio primi pili, der später als primipilus oder primus pilus bezeichnet wurde, der ranghöchste centurio in einer röm. Legion. Er befehligte den äußersten manipulus der triarii oder pilani auf dem rechten Flügel. Er gehörte normalerweise zum consilium des Feldherrn und hatte wie die anderen centuriones mehrere Jahre als Soldat gedient. Da die Legionen urspr. Jahr für Jahr rekrutiert wurden, diente der p. nur für ein Jahr und war danach wieder einfacher centurio; allerdings konnte ein p. diese Position mehrmals bekleiden. S…

Iuniores

(214 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] In der Centurienordnung, die in der historiographischen Überlieferung dem König Servius Tullius zugeschrieben wurde, war das röm. Volk nach dem jeweiligen Vermögen der einzelnen Bürger in classes eingeteilt, die gleichzeitig polit. und mil. Zwecken dienten. Dabei bestand jede Klasse aus zwei Gruppen von Bürgern, den iuniores (Männern im Alter von 17-46 Jahren), die Militärdienst zu leisten hatten und kämpfen mußten, wo und wann immer es von ihnen verlangt wurde, während es die Aufgabe der seniores (46-60 Jahre) war, die Stadt gegen Angriffe zu verteidi…

Legio

(5,266 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] A. Republik In der Frühzeit bestand das Heeresaufgebot Roms wahrscheinlich aus insgesamt 3000 Soldaten, wobei jede der drei tribus der Königszeit 1000 Mann stellte (Varro ling. 5,89) - eine als “die Aushebung” ( legio) bezeichnete Streitkraft. Die Servius Tullius von der historiographischen Überl. zugeschriebene Einteilung des röm. Volkes in sechs Vermögensklassen (Liv. 1,42,4-43,13; Dion. Hal. ant. 4,15-18) hatte auch einen mil. Zweck: Es hing vom Besitz eines Bürgers ab, mit welchen Waffen er sich ausstatten konnte. Die Besitzlosen ( capite censi) waren vo…

Riparienses milites

(196 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] R.m. werden zuerst in einem Edikt des Constantinus I. von 325 n. Chr. (Cod. Theod. 7,20,4) erwähnt: Hier werden sie als ripenses bezeichnet und von den comitatenses , dem Feldheer, unterschieden; sie standen in der Rangordnung unmittelbar unter den comitatenses, aber über den Soldaten der alae und cohortes, der Einheiten der Auxiliartruppen ( auxilia ). Nach 24 Dienstjahren wurden die r.m. von der Kopfsteuer für die eigene Person und für ihre Ehefrau befreit, waren aber bei einer Entlassung aus gesundheitlichen Gründen weniger privilegiert als die comitatenses. E…

Praetorianer

(851 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] ( cohortes praetoriae). In der röm. Republik war die cohors praetoria ( c. p.) eine kleine mil. Einheit, die das praetorium bewachte und als Eskorte des Feldherrn fungierte. Nach Festus (Fest. 223M.) soll Cornelius [I 71] Scipio Africanus als erster zu seinem Schutz “die tapfersten Männer” ausgewählt haben, die von anderen Dienstpflichten befreit waren und einen höheren Sold bezogen. In der späten Republik besaßen mächtige Feldherren starke Leibwachen; so stellte M. Antonius [I 9] 44 v. Chr. aus seinen Veteranen eine Leibwache von 6000 Mann auf. 27 v. Chr. schuf…

Manipulus

(248 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] Der m. (Manipel) wurde als taktische Einheit der röm. Legion im 4. Jh.v.Chr. eingeführt (Liv. 8,8,3: et quod antea phalanges similes Macedonicis, hoc postea manipulatim structa acies coepit esse); auf diese Weise konnten die Truppen für die Schlacht flexibler aufgestellt werden als in der Formation der Phalanx. Die Soldaten, die mit dem pilum (Wurfspeer) ausgerüstet waren, erhielten so mehr Raum für ihre Operationen. Die Legion wurde in drei Reihen zur Schlacht aufgestellt ( hastati, principes, triarii ), wobei jede der ersten beiden Reihen aus zehn manipuli mit…

Numerus

(214 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] Im röm. Militärwesen allg. eine Anzahl von Soldaten oder speziell eine mil. Einheit; da dem Wort eine präzise Bed. fehlt, konnte es sowohl auf die auxilia als auch auf die Legionen angewendet werden (Tac. Agr. 18,2; CIL III 12257: cohors Lusitanorum). Gerade Einheiten, die keinen eigenen Namen trugen, wurden n. genannt, so etwa die equites singulares Augusti (ILS 2182-2184; 2129) oder die exploratores (ILS 2631; 2632; 9186; 9187). Dasselbe gilt für Einheiten, die an den Grenzen des Imperiums rekrutiert worden waren; oftmals wurden diese numeri nach ihrer Herkunf…

Equites singulares

(658 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] Spätestens seit dem 2. Jh. v.Chr. hatten röm. Feldherren eine aus Reiterei und Fußtruppen bestehende Eliteeinheit, deren Angehörige unter den Kontingenten der ital. socii ausgewählt wurden, was auch für die extraordinarii zutraf. Gegen Ende der Republik wurden die Eliteeinheiten aus den auxilia rekrutiert; dabei ist unbekannt, ob diese auch einen besonderen Namen hatten. Ähnliche Einheiten scheint es auch zu Beginn des Prinzipats gegeben zu haben. Fabricius Tuscus kommandierte eine ala praetoria während des Germanienfeldzugs des Germanicus (11-14 …

Auxilia

(480 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] In den letzten beiden Jh. der Republik hat Rom Angehörige nicht-ital. Völker mit bes. mil. Fähigkeiten wie etwa kret. Bogenschützen, Schleuderer von den Balearen oder Reiter aus Numidien, Spanien oder Gallien, zwangsweise rekrutiert oder als Söldner angeworben. Nach der Schlacht von Actium verblieben 31 v.Chr. viele dieser Einheiten entweder als Freiwillige oder durch einen Vertrag an Rom gebunden im Dienst, während andere weiterhin unter ihren eigenen mil. Führern in ihrem Heima…

Discens

(100 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] bezeichnete im mil. Zusammenhang einen Soldaten, der für eine spezielle Funktion ausgebildet wurde. Inschr. belegen, daß den Legionen Soldaten angehörten, die auf den Dienst als Reiter (CIL VIII 2882 = ILS 2331), Sanitäter, Architekten oder Standarten- und Adlerträger ( discens aquiliferu(m) leg(ionis) III Aug(ustae), CIL VIII 2988 = ILS 2344) vorbereitet wurden. Es ist unklar, ob d. im Rang den immunes gleichstanden, also den Soldaten, die bes. Aufgaben hatten und von den munera, dem schweren Dienst, befreit waren. Auch bei den Praetorianern waren d. zu finden. C…

Evocati

(348 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[English version] Im 2. Jh. v.Chr. mußten die röm. Soldaten bis zu sechs Jahre Militärdienst leisten; anschließend hatten sie als evocati 16 Jahre lang für Einberufungen zur Verfügung zu stehen. Während der Bürgerkriege am Ende der röm. Republik versuchten einzelne Feldherren oft, erfahrene Soldaten zu überreden, zu ihren Einheiten zurückzukehren. Die so rekrutierten Truppen wurden als e. bezeichnet. Die e. besaßen einen höheren Rang als einfache Soldaten, aber einen niedrigeren als die centuriones. Entweder bildeten sie eine besondere Einheit, oder sie wurden in b…

Levy

(2,093 words)

Author(s): Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basle) | Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] I. Greece In geometrical and early archaic Greece, mainly nobles and their dependents took part in wars. With the rise of the phalanx in the 7th cent. BC, the Greek polity also levied free farmers, who could provide their weapons themselves. However, details about conscription are first known from the Classical period, especially from Athens and Sparta. In Athens, all citizens - probably with the exception of the thetai until the middle of the 4th cent. BC - were liable for military service between their 18th and 59th year; o…

Decurio, decuriones

(1,201 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin) | Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
Decurio (cf. decuria;  Decurio [4] via decus(s)is f. dec- and as) in general usage refers to a member or representative of a group of ten or tenth-part group (cf. Dig. 50,16,239,5); there is no shared etymology with curialis, a word of partly similar meaning derived from co-viria. In its specialized sense decurio denotes various functionaries: [German version] [1] A member of a curia in municipia and coloniae A member of a   curia , in those municipia and coloniae bound by Roman Law, was called decurio. Appointment of the usually 100 decuriones (occasionally smaller numbers) was regul…

Mercenaries

(1,073 words)

Author(s): Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basle) | Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] I. Greece Mercenaries (μισθοφόρος/ misthophóros or μισθωτός/ misthōtós, ξένος/ xénos) - soldiers who fought in foreign service as professional soldiers in exchange for payment ( misthós) - had existed in Greece since ancient times. In the 6th cent. BC they served Egyptian or eastern kings (Egypt: Hdt. 2,154; ML, No. 7; Babylon: Alc. 350 Lobel/Page); Greek tyrants like Peisistratus [4] or Polycrates [1] needed mercenaries to protect them (Hdt. 1,61; 3,45). Only from the Peloponnesian War onwards did the po…

Centuria

(874 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin) | Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
In general signifies an amount measured by or divided into units of 100, and can therefore relate e.g. to plots of land as well as to people. Thus the relationship to the figure 100 can be lost, the word then referring merely to a mathematically exactly measured or divided amount. [German version] A. Political Centuria is particularly used in the constitution of the Roman Republic to denote the electorate for the   comitia centuriata . In this meaning, the term probably derives from the contingent of 100 foot soldiers that, according to the histo…

Dux

(741 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast) | Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich)
[German version] [1] The term dux, which had already appeared in the Republican period with the general meaning of ‘a leader in a military action or of a troop of soldiers’ (cf. e.g. Cic. Dom. 12: seditionis duces), was in the 2nd cent. AD occasionally used in a semi-official way as the title for the commander of a military unit established for a particular purpose and not necessarily subordinate to the governor of a province. Thus Ti. Claudius Candidus was dux exercitus Illyrici in the war waged by Septimius Severus against Pescennius Niger in AD 193-195 (CIL II 4114 = ILS 1140); dux was also u…

Dux

(671 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast) | Tinnefeld, Franz (München)
[English version] [1] Titel im 2. Jh. Der Begriff d., der bereits in der Zeit der Republik allg. in der Bed. “Führer einer Aktion oder einer militärischen Gruppe” (vgl. etwa Cic. dom. 12: seditionis duces) erscheint, wurde im 2. Jh.n. Chr. bisweilen halboffiziell als Titel für den Befehlshaber einer für einen bestimmten Zweck aufgestellten mil. Einheit verwendet, die nicht unbedingt dem Statthalter einer Provinz unterstand. So war Ti. Claudius Candidus dux exercitus Illyrici in dem 193-195 n. Chr. von Septimius Severus gegen Pescennius Niger geführten Krieg (CIL I…

Decurio, decuriones

(1,053 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin) | Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
D. (wie decuria; D. [4] über decus(s)is aus dec- und as) meint in allg. Bed. ein Mitglied oder den Repräsentanten einer Zehner- oder Zehntel-Gruppe (vgl. dazu Dig. 50,16,239,5); keine gemeinsame Wortgeschichte besteht mit dem teilweise bedeutungsähnlichen von co-viria abgeleiteten Wort curialis. Im speziellen Sinn bezeichnet d. verschiedene Funktionsträger: [English version] [1] Mitglied einer curia in municipia und coloniae D. heißt das Mitglied einer curia in den nach röm. Recht verfaßten municipia und coloniae. Die Bestellung der normalerweise 100 d. (gelegentlich auch…

Centuria

(838 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin) | Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
Bedeutet im allg. eine mit der Zahl 100 gemessene oder durch sie geteilte Einheit und kann sich deshalb z.B. auf Landflächen ebenso beziehen wie auf Menschen. Dabei kann der Bezug zur Zahl C verloren gehen und das Wort nur noch eine rechnerisch genau abgemessene oder geteilte Einheit meinen. [English version] A. Politisch In der Verfassung der röm. Republik bezeichnet c. speziell den Wahlkörper der comitia centuriata . In dieser Bed. leitet sich der Begriff wohl her von dem Aufgebot in Höhe von 100 Fußsoldaten, das in der röm. Königszeit …

Cavalry

(2,665 words)

Author(s): Starke, Frank (Tübingen) | Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basle) | Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
I. Ancient Orient [German version] A. History With the development of the skill of driving teams of horses in the 1st half of the 2nd millennium BC, the methodological foundations of riding also were in place ( Horse III,  Horsemanship). Although there is definite evidence of mounted messengers and scouts from as early as the 14th/13th cents. BC onwards (Akkadogram LÚPETḪALLUM ‘rider’ in Hittite texts; Egyptian pictorial evidence [10]), the use of the cavalry as an armed force did not develop until during the 9th/8th cents. Decisive in this was the diff…

Reiterei

(2,374 words)

Author(s): Starke, Frank (Tübingen) | Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basel) | Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
I. Alter Orient [English version] A. Entwicklungsgeschichte Mit der Entwicklung der Fahrkunst in der 1. H. des 2. Jt. v. Chr. waren auch die methodischen Grundlagen für das Reiten gegeben (Pferd III., Reitkunst). Obwohl der Einsatz berittener Kuriere und Späher bereits ab dem 14./13. Jh. v. Chr. sicher bezeugt ist (Akkadogramm LÚPETḪALLUM “Reiter” in hethit. Texten; äg. Bildzeugnisse [10]), bildete sich die R. als Waffengattung erst im Verlauf des 9./8. Jh. heraus. Ausschlaggebend hierfür war die Schwierigkeit, reitend zu kämpfen. Denn im Unt…

Hasta

(1,030 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast) | Paulus, Christoph Georg (Berlin) | Siebert, Anne Viola (Hannover) | Salomone Gaggero, Eleonora (Genoa) | Barceló, Pedro (Potsdam) | Et al.
[German version] [1] Hasta, hastati In the Roman army of the middle Republic, the hasta served primarily as a thrust lance for close combat although it could also be thrown; it had a wooden shaft and an iron point. The hasta was adapted to the fighting style of the  phalanx, but it remained in use when, in the 4th cent. BC, the Romans adopted a more flexible set-up in maniples (  manipulus ). According to Livy (Liv. 8,8,5-13), whose account, however, is not without its problems, in 340 BC the Roman army consisted of three battle rows, the hastati, the principes and the triarii. The triarii were a…

Hasta

(959 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast) | Paulus, Christoph Georg (Berlin) | Siebert, Anne Viola (Hannover) | Salomone Gaggero, Eleonora (Genua) | Petraccia Lucernoni, Maria Federica (Mailand) | Et al.
[English version] [1] Hasta, hastati Die hasta diente im röm. Heer während der mittleren Republik vor allem als Stoßlanze für den Nahkampf, obwohl sie auch geworfen werden konnte; sie hatte einen hölzernen Schaft und eine Eisenspitze. Die h. war der Kampfweise der Phalanx angepaßt, blieb aber im Gebrauch, als die Römer im 4. Jh. v.Chr. zur flexibleren Aufstellung in Manipeln ( manipulus ) übergingen. Nach Livius (Liv. 8,8,5-13), dessen Darstellung allerdings nicht unproblematisch ist, bestand das röm. Heer 340 v.Chr. aus drei Schlachtreihen, den hastati, den principes und den triar…
▲   Back to top   ▲