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Eutharicus, Eutharic

(142 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) | Strothmann, Meret (Bochum)
[German version] Grandson of Berimund of the Amal dynasty, called to Italy by Theoderic the Great in AD 515 and married to  Amalasuntha in order to secure the succession (Iord. Get. 298). He was later adopted by Justin as his son-at-arms, received Roman citizenship; at the assumption of his consulate in 519 ─ on the occasion of which Cassiodorus had written a speech (MGH AA 12,465ff.) and probably also compiled his chronicle ─, he was called Flavius E. Cillica (CIL VI 32003). When he responded rig…

Claudius

(10,704 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Will, Wolfgang (Bonn) | Kierdorf, Wilhelm (Cologne) | Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Birley, A. R. (Düsseldorf) | Et al.
Name of a Roman lineage (Sabine Clausus, with the vernacular variant of   Clodius , esp. in the 1st cent. BC). The Claudii supposedly immigrated to Rome from the Sabine city of Regillum at the beginning of the republic in 504 BC under their ancestor Att(i)us Clausus ( Appius) and were immediately accepted into the circle of patrician families (Liv. 2,16,4-6), which explains why the early members received the invented epithets of Inregillensis C. [I 5-6] and Sabinus C. [I 31-32], [1. 155f.]. The praenomen Appius came to signify the family. Named after them was the Tribus Claudi…

Candidus

(240 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) | Bloch, René (Berne) | Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich)
A popular cognomen in the Imperial Age, attested with certainty from the 1st cent. AD (ThlL, Onom. 2,133ff.). [German version] [1] Christian in AD 200 Christian in c. AD 200, author of various lost treatise about the Hexaemeron (Eus. HE 5,27; Jer. vir. ill. 48). Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) [German version] [2] A follower of the Gnostic Valentinianus, 3rd cent. AD A follower of the Gnostic Valentinianus; in c. AD 230, he had a public dispute with  Origen, who accused him of retrospectively falsifying the records (Rufin. Apol. Orig. epil. = PG 17,625; Hier. Adv. Ru…

Herminafrid

(117 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld)
[German version] King of the Thuringians c. AD 507/511-531/2. Around 510 he married  Amalaberga, the niece of the king of the Ostrogoths  Theoderic the Great, and thus became involved in his policy of alliances (Anon. Vales. 12,70; Cassiod. Var. 4,1; Iord. Get. 299; Procop. Goth. 5,12,22). H. initially ruled with his brothers Baderic and Berthar. After their murder, he was sole ruler until he was overthrown by the king of the Franks  Theoderic c. 531/2. He died shortly afterwards. His territory became part of Franconia (Greg. Tur. Franc. 3,4-8; Procop. Goth. 5,13,1f.…

Gentunis

(56 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) | Strothmann, Meret (Bochum)
[German version] (Genzon). Son of  Geisericus, brother of Hunericus, father of Gunthamundus, Gelaridus, and Thrasamund (Procop. Vand. 1,5,11; 8,6-8; 9,6). In AD 468, he participated in the naval battle against  Basiliscus (Procop. Vand. 1,6,24), only to die in 477, preceding his father in death. PLRE 2,502-503 (Genton 1). Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) Strothmann, Meret (Bochum)

Hildericus, Hilderic

(135 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld)
[German version] Son of  Hunericus and Eudocia [2], the daughter of Valentinian III (Theoph. 5964; 6026), king of the Vandals in AD 523-530 who ended the anti-Catholic policies of his predecessors and attempted to come closer to Byzantium (he minted coins with the image of Justin I [1. 94]), while the relationship with the East Goths deteriorated considerably. The Vandal opposition under the leadership of  Gelimer therefore took advantage of a defeat of H.'s troops against Arabs in Byzacena to dep…

Patronomos

(197 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld)
[German version] (πατρονόμος, ‘guardian of the ancestral traditions’). Predominantly epigraphically attested title of a Spartan annual official, created in c. 227 BC by Cleomenes [6] III; the institution of this office was probably connected with the temporary abolition of the éphoroi and the limitation of the political influence of the  gerousía (Paus. 2,9,1). In the Roman period, the patronomos, attested from the 1st cent. BC as Sparta's eponymous magistrate, oversaw six sýnarchoi or synpatronómoi (cf. IG V 1,48; SEG XI 503 with [2]). The tasks of a patronomos, which were linked…
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