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Cavarillus

(61 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] Celtic name compound from cavar ‘powerful, strong’ [1. 331-332]. Noble Aeduan, as a successor of  Litaviccus in 52 BC commander of an infantry contingent of his tribe for Caesar. C. defected to Vercingetorix and was captured in battle together with Cotus and  Eporedorix (Caes. B Gall. 7,67,7). Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Evans. H. Bannert, s.v. C., RE Suppl. 15, 87-88.

Gargoris

(85 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] Name derived from an uncertain Indo-European root [1. 118-119]. Legendary king of the Curetes (?) in  Tartessus, who allegedly invented honey gathering. He repeatedly attempted to have his grandson Habis, who was born after a slip by his daughter, killed by wild animals but they spared and even nursed him. G. recognized his growing grandchild and made him his successor (Iust. 44,4,1-14).  Exposure, myths of Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 M. Lourdes Albertos Firmat, La onomastica personal primitiva, 1966. H. J. Rose, Griech. Mythologie, 51978, 2…

Tarcondarius

(75 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] (Ταρκονδάριος/ Tarkondários). T. Castor I, tetrarch of the Tectosages, with a Celtic name [1. 1732]. In the battle of Pharsalus in 48 BC, T. and his father-in-law Deiotarus supported Pompeius [I 3], sending him 300 horsemen (Caes. B Civ. 3,4,5). After Caesar's death in 44 BC, he and his wife were killed in his residence of Gorbeus by Deiotarus (Str. 12,5,3). He was the father of T. Castor II (Deiotarus). Galatia Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Holder 2

Chiomara

(144 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] (Χιομάρα; Chiomára). Celtic name of the wife of the Tolistobogian king  Ortiagon [1. 156]. In 189 BC, after the victory of Cn.  Manlius Vulso over the Galatians at Olympus, C. came into the hands of a centurio. When he first sexually assaulted her and then wanted to set her free in return for a high ransom, she had him killed at the handover. She delivered his head to her husband. Polybius is supposed to have met her personally in Sardis, evidently when she was interned there after the fall of Ortiagon in 183 BC. P…

Critognatus

(101 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] (Ecritognatus). Celtic composite name with variant readings: ‘knows trembling’ or ‘born to attack’ [1. 78-79; 2. 185]. Arvernian nobleman, who in 52 BC extolled his fellow combatants in besieged Alesia to hold out when the absence of the Gaulish relief army caused serious provisioning difficulties. Caesar (B Gall. 7,77,2-16) relates the full wording of C.'s speech as an example of Gaulish cruelty because he called for eating the bodies of the old and the infirm rather than falling into eternal Roman servitude.  Alesia Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 …

Mariccus

(44 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] A Boian; in AD 69, as ‘self-styled saviour and divine protector’ of Gaul, he instigated an uprising in the territory of the Haedui; this was put down by Vitellius. M. was executed (Tac. Hist. 2,61). Haedui; Boii Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)

Tarcondimotus

(191 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
(Ταρκονδίμοτος/ Tarkondímotos; also Ταρκόνδημος/ Tarkóndēmos). [German version] [1] T. I. Philantonius King of Amanus, son of Straton. Roman ally, partisan of Pompeius [I 3], Caesar, Cassius [I 10] and finally Antonius [I 9], on whose side he fell at Actium in 31 BC (Plut. Antonius 61,2; Cass. Dio. 41,63,1; 47,26,2; 50,14,2; Flor. Epit. 2,13,5; IGR 3, 901 = OGIS 752 and 753). In 51 BC Cicero appraises him as fidelissimus socius trans Taurum amicissimusque populi Romani ("the most faithful ally beyond the Taurus and the best friend of the Roman people", Cic. Fam. 15,…

Cotuatus

(57 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
Celtic composite name from cot -- ‘old’ (Evans, 340-342). [German version] [1] Leader of an army of Carnutes Leader of an army of Carnutes, who in 52 BC attacked and murdered Roman merchants in Cenabum together with Conconnetodumnus. As a deterrent, Caesar had him cruelly executed (Caes. B. Gall. 7,3; 8,38). Conconnetodumnus Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)

Casticus

(79 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] Celtic compound name from -ico- [1. 330-331]. Son of Catamantaledes, king of the Sequani, ‘the one who defeats the enemy in battle’ [1. 66-69; 2. 166-167]. C. was persuaded by  Orgetorix in 59 BC to seize royal power in his house as his father had apparently died. The triple alliance between C., Orgetorix and  Dumnorix failed because of the death of Orgetorix (Caes. B Gall 1,3,4). Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Evans. 2 Schmidt. H. Bannert, s.v. C., RE Suppl. 15, 84-87.

Bituitus

(115 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] Celt whose name is a compound form based on bitu- ‘world’ [1.149]. King of the Arverni, defeated in 121 BC by the consul Q.  Fabius Maximus in the region of the Isère's confluence with the Rhône when he came to the aid of the  Allobroges. B. was afterwards banished by the Senate to Alba (Liv. per. 61; Eutr. 4,22; Flor. Epit. 1,37; Oros. 5,14,1 i.a.; Fasti triumphales, CIL I2 634, p. 49 Betulto). His son, Congonnetiacus (Contoniatus), was initially brought to Rome as a hostage but may later have been installed as a client king (Diod. Sic. 34,36). Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bib…

Aneroestes

(48 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] (Ἀνηροέστης, Ἀνηρόεστος; Anēroéstēs, Anēróestos). Celtic name, perhaps a variant of Anarevisios (‘very wise’). King of the  Gaesates, committed suicide after the defeat of the Celtic army at Telamon (225 BC) (Pol. 2,22,2; 2,26,5; 2,31,2; Flor. 1,20: Ariovisto duce). Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography Schmidt, 126, 131.

Waluburg

(180 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] (Βαλουβουργ; Baloubourg). Semnonian seer ('Sibyl'), mentioned on an AD 2nd-century óstrakon from Elephantine (in Egypt): Βαλουβουργ Σήνονι σιβύλλᾳ (SB III 6221). The inscription contains a list of people on the staff of the praefectus Aegypti ; W. was therefore in Roman service and may have been responsible for interpreting omens and soothsaying. Her name may trace back to Gothic *walus (pilgrim's/traveller's staff or magic wand). Other Germanic women seers probably also had political roles beyond their tribes, e.g. Ganna, a successor to Veled…

Correus

(106 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] Celtic(?) name of a chieftain of the  Bellovaci, ‘dwarf’? [1. 339-340]. In 51 BC, together with  Commius, C. led the last large revolt of several Gaulish tribes against Caesar, which was also supported by Germanic troops. After initial success in beating the Rome-friendly  Remi and by avoiding an open battle with the Romans through clever tactics, an ambush laid by C. ultimately failed. The Gauls were beaten and C. fell in battle (Caes. B Gall. 8,6-21; Oros. 6,11,12-14). The name also appears on a British gold coin [2. 1134f.; 3. 153]. Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bib…

Lutarius

(81 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] (Λουτάριος; Loutários also Λουτούριος; Loutoúrios). Galatian tribal prince with a Celtic name, as the leader of the Trocmi he was co-commander with Leonnorius. At the Hellespont the two princes parted. Leonnorius moved back to Byzantium and L. crossed over to Asia Minor with the aid of captured ships. Nicomedes I of Bithynia's offer then led to the reunification of the two Celtic groups (Liv. 38,16,5-9). Galatia Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography K. Strobel, Die Galater, vol. 1, 1996, 236-257.

Brennus

(270 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
(Βρέννος; Brénnos). Celtic titular name, from the Breton brennin ‘King’ [1. 105-108]. [German version] [1] Gallian prince, defeated the Romans at the Allia, 390 BC In the Roman annalistic tradition, prince of the Gallic  Senones, who in 390 BC decisively defeated the Romans at the Allia and occupied and pillaged Rome. When the Romans besieged on the Capitol tried to negotiate the withdrawal of the Gauls for 1,000 pounds of gold, B. threw his sword on the scales as well, saying vae victis (Liv. 5,38-49; Plut. Camillus 18-30). Rome's destruction created the bogey of ‘barbaric …

Dumnacus

(78 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] (Domnacus). Celtic name; leader of the Andes (Evans, 345). In 51 BC D. besieged Duratius at Lemonum with his army. When he failed to storm the camp of the legate C. Caninius Rebilus, who had hastened to the aid of Duratius, he attempted to flee across the Loire before the advancing forces of C.  Fabius. There he was overtaken, and cut down in the subsequent battle (Caes. B Gall. 8,26-29).  Duratius Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)

Leonnorius

(231 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] (Λεωννώριος/ Leōnnṓrios; Λεωννόριος/ Leōnnórios; Latin Lonorius). Galatian tribal prince; his name is Celtic. As leader of the Tolistobogii along with Lutarius, L. led a nomadic group of c. 20,000 people, who had broken away from the army of Brennus [2] in 279/278 and moved through Thrace and the Propontis and pressed Byzantium. The Celts were able to force many of the cities of the Propontis and the Thracian Chersonesus [1] to pay tributes, but were then taken on as mercenaries by Nicomedes I of Bithyni…

Maelo

(98 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] (Greek Μέλωνος/ Mélōnos; Μαίλος/ Maílos). King of the Sugambri with a Celtic name [1. 374], who is supposed to have started the war against the Romans according to Str. 7,1,4; this probably refers to the defeat of M. Lollius [II 1] in 17/6 BC. After the forced relocation of the Sugambri to the left side of the Rhine (8 BC) he appears to have sought refuge with Augustus (R. Gest. div. Aug. 32). The son of his brother Baetorix, Deidorix, was carried along in the triumphal parade of Germanicus [2]. Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Holder, 2.

Ambigatus

(83 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] (Ambicatos). Celtic compound name with ambi- ‘around’ [5. 122-123, 215; 1. 134-135; 4. 708]. According to Livy the  Biturigan A. during the reign of  Tarquinius Priscus in Rome was king of all Celts (Liv. 5,34,2). Because of overpopulation, he is supposed to have, under the leadership of his nephew  Segovesus, caused the first Celtic immigration to the Po Plain (Liv. 5,34,3-9). Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Evans 2 Holder, vol. 1, 120 3 E. Klebs, s. v. A. RE 1, 1798 4 R. M. Ogilvie, Comm. on Livy, 1965 5 Schmidt.

Acco

(48 words)

Author(s): Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum)
[German version] Celtic name of uncertain origin [1]. Leader (?) of the  Senones, who in 53 BC called for an unsuccessful uprising against the Romans and was thereafter executed (Caes. B Gall. 6,4; 44). Spickermann, Wolfgang (Bochum) Bibliography 1 Evans, 297 f. E. Klebs, s. v. A., RE 1, 151.
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