Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)" )' returned 85 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Testudo

(462 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] The term testudo ('tortoise') was used by the Roman military in two senses; it described on the one hand various tactical formations in battle, and on the other hand various engines deployed in besieging cities. In the first case it consisted of soldiers, who, standing in a line, held their rectangular shields side to side without gaps in front of themselves, in such a way as to confront the enemy with a wall, as it were,  of wood and iron (Liv. 32,17,13). When the soldiers formed u…

Desertor

(279 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] The Roman army regarded as a desertor anyone who did not appear at roll-call (Liv. 3,69,7) or who during a battle was beyond the range of the trumpet or who left his unit in time of peace without permission, without commeatus (Suet. Oth. 11,1; SHA Sept. Sev. 51,5; Dig. 49,16,14) (‘distanced himself from the signa’). The punishments were merciless: depending on the case a person was at risk of slavery (Frontin. 4,1,20), mutilation (SHA Avid. Cass. 4, 5) or death (the condemned person was beaten with canes and then thrown down from the Tarpeium saxum or crucified). The decimatio…

Cornicines

(109 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] The cornicines were military musicians ( aeneatores). They played the cornu, a wind instrument curved into a circle and made of bronze; the distinction from the bucina is difficult. These soldiers were taken from among the poorest citizens and were already represented in the Servian centuriate (Liv. 1.43). On their own the cornicines gave the standards the command to change position, and jointly with the   tubicines the signals in battle (Veg. Mil. 2.22;3.5). Under the Principate the cornicines were held in higher regard than in the Republic, as their menti…

Ensigns

(851 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] The ensigns of the Roman army fulfilled an important tactical function: the transfer of commands from the commander; in this case they were accompanied by the sound of the cornu (Veg. Mil. 2,22). Due to their importance, they achieved an almost religious validity (cf. for instance Tac. Ann. 1,39,4). According to tradition, Romulus provided the first legion with animal symbols such as the eagle, the wolf, the horse, the wild boar and the minotaur (Plin. HN 10,16). At that time, each of the thirty maniples supposedly received a signum (Ov. Fast. 3,115; Plut. Romulus 8)…

Tabulae honestae missionis

(103 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] Tabulae honestae missionis is the name given to Roman documents certifying the good conduct of soldiers during their period of service; they were issued upon request to veterans at their retirement from military service, enabling them, if they were entitled, to receive the military diploma and thus citizenship. Only a few copies have been found, but these were distributed across the entire Roman Empire. Their structure corresponded to that of military diplomas: 1. confirmation of honesta missio [1], 2. the certifying officer, 3. authentication, 4. date, 5…

War chariot

(855 words)

Author(s): Hausleiter, Arnulf (Berlin) | Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon) | Pingel, Volker (Bochum)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient and Egypt In both the Ancient Orient and Egypt the WC was a single-axle open chariot with spoked wheels pulled by horses. WCs were predominantly made of wood and in some cases clad in metal. The first evidence of WCs is on 2nd millennium BC seal rolls in Anatolia, and then in Syria (Seals). Their origin is disputed. In particular Hittite texts record the military significance of WCs (battle of Qadesh in 1275 BC between Muwatalli II and Ramses [2] II). There is also ev…

Vigiliae

(265 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] One of the chief concerns of Roman generals was the safety of their troops; both in a fixed legionary camp and in the field, legions were protected by the posting of guards, positioned in front of the vallum, outside the camp, and on the gates or on the vallum; individual guards also had the task of protecting higher officers (Pol. 6,35f; Sall. Iug. 100,4). Polybius gives a precise description of the organization of guard duty (νυκτερινὴ φυλακή/ nykterinḕ phylakḗ: Pol. 6,33-37; cf. Onasander 10,10 f.; Veg. Mil. 3,8,17 ff.). To prevent the sentries becoming …

Bucinatores

(114 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] Along with tubicines and cornicines, bucinatores were musicians in the Roman army; the bucina was a bronze wind instrument (Veg. Mil. 2,11; 3,5), whose exact shape is contentious. In Republican times, the duties of the night-watchmen were regulated by bucina signals (Pol. 6,35; Liv. 7,36; Frontin. Str. 1,5,17). During the Principate, a bucina call signalled the end of the convivium in camp (Tac. Ann. 15,30,1); in late antiquity the bucinatores gave the signal for the execution of soldiers.  Aeneatores Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon) Bibliography 1 R. Meucci, Riflessioni di…

Soldiers' pay

(831 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
Sources give only little information about the introduction and development of SP in Greece and in Rome, and they contain only few precise figures for the amounts. Hence modern works on SP are largely based on assumptions and estimates resulting from them. [German version] I. Greece In Greece, soldiers of the citizen contingent of a polis probably did not receive regular money until the 5th cent. BC, and this was initially used to pay for provisions (σιτηρέσιον/ sitērésion ); at the beginning of the Peloponnesian War the Athenian hoplítai besieging Potidaea were given pay (μισθός/ misthós…

Aeneatores

(102 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] were the musicians of the Roman legions and were already documented in the Servian centuria regulation. They included the tubicines, cornicines and bucinatores, who transmitted the officers' orders in the camp, while marching and during battle. The word aeneatores appeared only once in the imperial period (CIL XIII 6503): in the 4th cent. AD they were mentioned in Amm. Marc. 16,12,36 and 24,4,22.  Bucinatores;  Cornicines;  Tubicines Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon) Bibliography 1 A. Baudot, Musiciens romains de l'Antiquité, 1973 2 R. Meucci, Riflessioni di archeolog…

Exauctorare

(226 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] The verb exauctorare refers to the judicial act, by which a Roman military commander could release a soldier or an entire unit from their oath of allegiance. Such an act could be carried out at certain times defined in law, in the Republican era for example following a victory, at the time of the Principate at the end of a soldier's compulsory military service (Suet. Aug. 24,2; Suet. Tib. 30; Tac. Ann. 1,36,4; Tac. Hist. 1,20,6). In exceptional circumstances, this might be linked wi…

Labarum

(209 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] Before the Battle of the Milvian Bridge ( Pons Milvius) against Maxentius in AD 312, in a dream described as a vision, Constantine I was advised to have the first two letters of the name of Christ, in Greek chi and rho (Χ and Ρ), inscribed on the shields of his soldiers, if he wished victory: τούτῳ νίκα (‘By this sign be victorious’; cf. Lactant. De mort. pers. 44; Euseb. Vita Const. 1,26-31). This Christogram was later fixed to the tip of a standard consisting of a long lance with a flag bearing the Imperial medallion hung on a crosspiece. It is unclear whether the name labarum given…

Armour

(709 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] Even the heroes of the Homeric epics protected themselves with armour made of bronze or linen (Hom. Il. 3,830; 11,15-28). In the archaic period, body armour (θώραξ/  Thorax ) was included as part of the equipment of the Greek   hoplítai ; during the classic period however, metal armour was increasingly replaced by armour made of lighter materials. In the Roman army, armour ( lorica) was worn by the prima classis (according to Liv. 1,43,2, this in the early days of Rome denoted the wealthiest class of citizens with assets of 100,000 As or more). Diff…

Imaginiferi, Imaginifarii

(215 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] The imaginifer was a soldier who, at least at festivals, carried an image ( imago) of the princeps (Veg. Mil. 2,6; 2,7; Jos. Ant. Iud. 18,55); the imaginiferi certainly did not have any specifically military duties. There was an imaginifer in each legion, though he did not necessarily belong to the first cohort (  cohors ) (CIL III 2553: 3rd cohort). According to Vegetius (Mil. 2,7), imaginiferi also occurred in other units. Imaginiferi are attested in inscriptions for the cohortes urbanae and the   vigiles in Rome and for the legions and the units of the   auxilia ( alae, cohor…

Accensi

(147 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] Originally, the accensi (also accensi velati, ‘clothed (only) with a cloth cloak’) were members of the army who were too poor to equip themselves. They accompanied the legions and, positioned behind the other soldiers, had to replace the dead using their weapons (Fest. 369 M; Liv. 8,8,8; Cic. Rep. 2,40). They were recruited according to their census income. After the introduction of pay for soldiers (in our record in 406 BC) they no longer appeared in this form. From then on the term accensi described a small, little respected part of the troops that was recruit…

Disciplina militaris

(943 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] The Latin term disciplina designates a) a field of knowledge or an academic discipline and b) obedience. According to Livy (Liv. 9,17,10), in Rome disciplina militaris had evolved into an ars. In conjunction with the Roman military, disciplina generally appears in its second meaning; Frontinus calls the knowledge of military matters rei militaris scientia (Frontin. Str. 1 praef. 1). The phrase is used by Valerius Maximus as well as Pliny and is furthermore epigraphically documented (Val.Max. 2,7; Plin. Ep. 10,29; S.c. de Cn. Pisone patre, 52; ILS 3809; cf. disciplina…

Decorations, military

(877 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] Decorations were used to reward soldiers' bravery and acts of courage in the Roman army as in all other armies, their advantage being that their cost to the common purse was slight, while at the same time they reinforced general awareness of military honour (Pol. 6,39). A pronounced feeling for hierarchical structures also had its influence on such decorations, as they were awarded according to the rank of the receiver (  dona militaria ). As A. Büttner has shown, the origins of Roman decorations may be found not only in Italy, but a…

Corvus

(137 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] [1] Military The invention of the corvus (‘raven’) is attributed to C. Duilius, cos. in 260 BC and victor over the Carthaginians in the battle of Mylae. It was a boarding-plank attached to the bow of the ship, steered with the aid of a pulley and a rope. When it was thrown on to the enemy ship, a metal hook remained fixed to the deck; this was a way of damaging the enemy's rigging, which allowed the Roman soldiers to enter the ship (Pol. 1,22,23). With the invention of the corvus the tactic of boarding was given precedence over ramming. Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon) Bibliography 1 L. Poznans…

Military writers

(522 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] The intellectual education of the future officers of the Roman army was based on the reading and interpretation of the works of historians such as Polybius and Livy, as well as the military regulations put into force under Augustus and Hadrian, which were still valid under Severus Alexander (Veg. Mil. 1,27: Augusti atque Hadriani constitutiones; Suet. Aug. 24f.; cf. Cass. Dio 69,9,4). Alongside these, works by Cato, Marius [I 1], Rutilius Rufus (Val. Max. 2,3,2), and Arrius [II 5] Menander were also read. Under Constantinus [1], thes…

Manoeuvres

(525 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] Military exercises ( exercitium, exercitatio militaris, decursio), for a long time little studied by historians, contributed considerably to the military success of the Roman army and appear to have been conducted on the Field of Mars ( Campus Martius ) in early times. From the late 3rd cent. BC, military exercises were developed further in both practice and theory. Cornelius [I 71] Scipio Africanus organized manoeuvres systematically in Spain in 210 BC (Pol. 10,20; Liv. 26,51,3-7) and then in Sicily…

Vallum

(146 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] (related to Latin vallus, 'stake, palisade'), occasionally used with the general meaning 'protective wall' (Liv. 9,14,7; 36,18,2; Frontin. Str. 3,17,9), usually in a military context. The typical Roman defensive installation, which was built during a campaign or a siege, consisted of a fossa ('ditch'), agger ('earthen wall') and v. ('palisade'); soldiers dug out the ditch, throwing the earth inwards and building the v. on this earth wall (Veg. Mil. 3,8,7-9; 4,28,3; Liv. 10,25,6 f.; cf. also the precise description of a Roman v. in Liv. 33,5,5-12). Finally, var…

War, consequences of

(1,115 words)

Author(s): Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basle) | Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] I. Greece The consequences of a war in Ancient Greece for individuals, cities or kingdoms depended on its duration and size, and a systematic or general assessment is thus not unproblematic. Several authors describe the terrible sight of a battlefield (Xen. Hell. 4,4,12; Xen. Ages. 2,14f.; Plut. Pelopidas 18,5; cf. Thuc. 7,84f.). During a hoplite battle in the classical period, on average 5% of the victors and 14% of the vanquished would fall [4]; in addition there would be the woun…

Dona militaria

(887 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] Particularly deserving soldiers and officers of the Roman army were granted marks of honour ( Decorations, military), with the rank of the recipient playing an important role. The practice of presenting such marks of honour changed in the course of the Republican period and the Principate. The older tradition reported the granting of decorations in the early Republic (Plin. HN 22,6-13) but the first credible information is found in Polybius (6,39). Honorary distinctions are docume…

Castra

(2,134 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon) | Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne) | Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana) | Lombardo, Mario (Lecce) | Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) | Et al.
A. Military camp [German version] [I 1] General The Roman soldiers always made sure that they were protected by fortifications. This also applied when they only stopped for a night on campaigns. In the evening of their arrival the field camp had to be set up and destroyed again on the morning of departure. The plural castra was the name given to any kind of military camp, the singular castrum certainly existed but was not used in mil. vocabulary. Castellum is the diminutive form of castra (Veg. Mil. 3,8) and also had a civilian meaning. The origin of the Roman camps is uncertain; because …

Tabernaculum

(216 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] (derived from trabs, 'tree trunk', 'beam'; diminutive of taberna, 'hut', 'shop'). In the Roman military context, tabernaculum describes all forms of housing for soldiers (Cic. Brut. 37). Provisional shelters could be built from a variety of materials, such as reeds and wood (Liv. 27,3,2-3; Frontin. Str. 4,1,14). Tents were made of leather (Liv. 23,18,5; Tac. Ann. 13,35,3; 14,38,1); in the winter, they were insulated against the cold with straw (Caes. B Gall. 8,5,2). The arrangement of the tents i…

Burgus

(90 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] The origin of the word burgus is disputed by researchers: either a Germanic (CIL XIII 6509) or else a Greek origin (πύργος; pýrgos; Jos. BI 1,99-100) are assumed. The word, which appears before the middle of the 2nd cent. AD and is still attested under Valentinian I, denotes a small fortified watchtower (ILS 396) or is used as a diminutive for   castellum (Veg. Mil. 4.10).; the burgus was generally used for surveillance (CIL VIII 2494-2495: burgus speculatorius). Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon) Bibliography 1 D. Baatz, Bauten, MAVORS XI, 1994, 83-85.

Contubernium

(159 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] in the basic meaning of the word meant a communal lodging of soldiers; it applied either to a tent camp during an expeditio or to barracks in a fixed encampment (Tac. Ann. 1,41,1). Two extensions of meaning developed from that: the term was used for a group of soldiers sharing a lodging, and from that it was used to describe a shared sense of trust and solidarity among those soldiers (Suet. Tib. 14,4; Caes. B Civ. 2,29). This included the officers. The contubernium seems not to have been a tactical unit, although in Vegetius (Veg. Mil. 2,13) the contubernium is used as a synon…

Pilum

(592 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] In a brief reference in Servius (Serv. Aen. 7,664: “pilum proprie est hasta Romana”), the pilum, a throwing-spear, is taken for the typical Roman spear. Among the earliest evidence for the use of the pilum in the Roman army is the depiction of the Battle of Panormus in 250 BC (Pol. 1,40). In Livy (8,8), the first two battle rows of the legions in the time around 340 BC are called the antepilani ('soldiers in front of the pilum bearers'). In his description of the Roman army, Polybius speaks of the γρόσφοι/ grósphoi as the javelins of the youngest soldiers, and the ὑσσοί/ hyssoí as …

Ala

(332 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) | Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] [1] Part of the Roman atrium house Part of the Roman atrium house ( House;  Atrium). The term ala designates two opposing rooms, open in their full width and height, that form the cross axis in front of the tablinum or main room of the house. Alae were very common in Roman home construction; Vitruvius lists the correct proportions for design (6,3,4). The origin of the design type is unclear. The conjecture that, in Vitruvius' description of the Tuscan temple (4,7,1), the term for the two outer cellae of the Etruscan temple ( Temple) is alae (instead of aliae, as the text has…

Armamentaria

(178 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[German version] In early times the armamentaria or arsenals were situated in Rome itself; with the expansion of the Roman Imperium they were also installed in cities close to the theatres of war. In the legionary camps of the Principate the armamentaria were in the principia, those for the navy in the ports (CIL VI 999, 2725; VIII 2563); in Rome there was an armamentarium in the castra praetoria. The weapons were stored according to type, not army unit, and were guarded by the armorum custodes; the armamentarium was under the authority of a curator operis armamentarii and a magister, who was…

Corvus

(136 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] [1] militärisch Die Erfindung des c. (“Rabe”) wird C. Duilius, cos. 260 v.Chr. und Sieger über die Karthager in der Schlacht bei Mylae, zugeschrieben. Es handelte sich um eine Enterbrücke, die am Bug des Schiffes angebracht war und mit Hilfe einer Rolle und eines Seils dirigiert wurde. Wenn man sie auf das feindliche Schiff niederfallen ließ, blieb ein Metallhaken fest im Verdeck stecken; so konnte die Takelage des Gegners beschädigt werden, die röm. Soldaten konnten das Schiff entern (Pol. 1,22,23). Mit der Erfindung des c. wurde der Taktik des Enterns der Vorz…

Auszeichnungen, militärische

(811 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] Um die Tapferkeit und den Mut von Soldaten zu belohnen, wurden im röm. Heer - wie in allen anderen Heeren auch - A. vergeben, die den Vorteil hatten, daß sie das Gemeinwesen wenig kosteten und gleichzeitig das Bewußtsein soldatischer Ehre verstärkten (Pol. 6,39). Das starke Empfinden für hierarchische Strukturen hatte auch Einfluß auf derartige A., denn sie wurden abhängig vom Dienstgrad des Empfängers vergeben ( dona militaria ). Wie A. Büttner gezeigt hat, waren die röm. A. sicherlich ital., daneben aber auch kelt., griech. …

Burgus

(87 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] Die Herkunft des Wortes b. ist in der Forsch. umstritten: Es wird sowohl ein german. (CIL XIII 6509) oder auch ein griech. Ursprung (πύργος; Ios. bell. Iud. 1,99-100) angenommen. Das Wort, das vor Mitte des 2.Jh. n.Chr. erscheint und noch unter Valentinianus I. nachgewiesen ist, bezeichnet einen kleinen befestigten Wachturm (ILS 396) oder wird als Diminutiv für castellum gebraucht (Veg. mil. 4,10).; der b. diente allg. der Überwachung (CIL VIII 2494-2495: b. speculatorius). Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon) Bibliography 1 D. Baatz, Bauten, MAVORS XI, 1994, 83-85.

Corniculum, cornicularii

(173 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] In der Zeit der Republik gehörte das c. zu den dona militaria (Liv. 10,44,5; Suet. gramm. 9; CIL I2 709 = ILS 8888); in der Prinzipatszeit sind die cornicula nur noch ein Rangabzeichen. Die genaue Bed. des Wortes ist umstritten. Entweder wird es von cornus (Kornellkirsche) oder von cornu(Horn) hergeleitet. Es handelte sich dementsprechend entweder um zwei kleine Speere (vgl. Pol. 6,39) oder aber um kleine Hörner, die von den Helmen herunterhingen. Die c. stellten die Elite der principales und erfüllten ohne Zweifel Verwaltungsaufgaben, denn es sind zivile c. nachgew…

Bewaffnung

(2,167 words)

Author(s): Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basel) | Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] I. Griechenland Die Bewaffnung griech. Heere in geom. Zeit ist lit. vor allem in der Ilias dokumentiert, arch. durch vornehmlich aus Gräbern stammenden Waffenfunde und Vasendarstellungen. Diese Quellengattungen sind nicht immer in Übereinstimmung zu bringen, da Homer einige seiner Helden Waffen aus myk. Zeit benutzen läßt, die arch. nicht mehr belegt sind (z.B. Eberzahnhelm, Il. 10,261-265; Lang- oder Turmschild, Il. 7,219-223; Streitwagen, die auf geom. Vasen oft dargestellt sind …

Marschgepäck

(384 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] Zwei lat. Wörter, impedimenta und sarcina, bezeichneten das M. der röm. Legionen. Bei den impedimenta handelte es sich um das schwere Gepäck, das der Versorgung und Ausrüstung der gesamten Legion diente und von Tragtieren befördert wurde (Pol. 6,27; 6,40; Liv. 28,45; Caes. Gall. 5,31,6). Es umfaßte die Zelte, das Gepäck der Offiziere, die Handmühlen für das Getreide, die Nahrungsmittel, die Waffen und, nach einem Sieg, das Geld und die Kriegsbeute. Anfangs bezog sich das Wort impedimenta nur auf Sachen, im Verlauf der Entwicklung wurde es auch für Mensc…

Kriegsbeute

(1,470 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basel) | Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] I. Alter Orient Im Alten Orient galt das Aufbringen von K. der Versorgung mit wichtigen Rohstoffen (z.B. Metallen Äg.: Gold aus Nubien, Silber aus Kilikien, Kupfer aus Zypern (MR); Assyrien: Eisen aus Iran, Silber aus Kilikien; Kilikes, Kilikia) und für die weitere Kriegsführung benötigten Objekten (z.B. Pferde, Streitwagen im Assyrien des 1. Jt.v.Chr.) oder diente zur Versorgung der königl. Hofhaltung mit Luxusgütern zu Prestigezwecken. K. ist von Tributleistungen zu unterscheiden,…

Ordo

(898 words)

Author(s): Paulus, Christoph Georg (Berlin) | Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn) | Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon) | Heimgartner, Martin (Basel)
bezeichnet lat. sowohl eine Ordnung (z.B. eine Marsch- oder Prozeßordnung) als auch die Gruppe oder Körperschaft, in die mehrere oder viele eingeordnet waren (auch im Pl. ordines), z.B. die röm. Ritterschaft ( o. equester). [English version] I. Prozessrecht Im prozessualen Kontext wird o. herkömmlicherweise in der Zusammensetzung ›o. iudiciorum‹ (Cod. Iust. 7,45,4) verwendet. Damit werden die ordentlichen Verfahrenstypen (vgl. noch heute: ›ordentliche‹ Gerichtsbarkeit) sowohl des Formularprozesses ( formula ) als auch des Legisaktionenverfahrens ( legis actio

Imaginiferi, Imaginifarii

(204 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] Der imaginifer war ein Soldat, der zumindest bei Festen ein Bildnis ( imago) des Princeps trug (Veg. mil. 2,6; 2,7; Ios. ant. Iud. 18,55); sicherlich besaßen die i. keine direkt mil. Aufgaben. In jeder Legion gab es einen imaginifer, der jedoch nicht unbedingt der ersten Kohorte ( cohors ) angehörte (CIL III 2553: 3. Kohorte). Nach Vegetius (mil. 2,7) waren i. auch in anderen Einheiten vertreten. Inschriftlich sind i. für die cohortes urbanae und die vigiles in Rom sowie für die Legionen und die Einheiten der auxilia ( alae, cohortes und numeri), nicht aber für die Pra…

Commeatus

(334 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] C. hat zwei verschiedene Bedeutungen: Es beschreibt entweder eine zeitlich begrenzte Beurlaubung (im Gegensatz zur endgültigen Entlassung, der missio) oder bestimmte Teile der Versorgung. Der Begriff stellatura bezeichnet den Mißbrauch beider Einrichtungen. 1. Die Beurlaubung bedeutete für die Soldaten, sich von den Feldzeichen entfernen zu dürfen (Tac. hist. 1,46,4). Fälschlicherweise wurde der c. mit der immunitas oder vacatio munerum verwechselt, die die Befreiung von den üblichen Arbeitsdiensten, die die Soldaten zu verrichten hatte…

Kriegsfolgen

(1,039 words)

Author(s): Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basel) | Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] I. Griechenland Welche Folgen ein Krieg im ant. Griechenland für Individuen, Städte oder Königreiche hatte, hing von seiner Dauer und Dimension ab; eine Sytematisierung oder Verallgemeinerung der K. ist daher nicht unproblematisch. Mehrere Autoren beschreiben das schreckliche Aussehen eines Schlachtfeldes (Xen. hell. 4,4,12; Xen. Ag. 2,14f.; Plut. Pelopidas 18,5; vgl. Thuk. 7,84f.). Während einer Hoplitenschlacht fielen in klass. Zeit durchschnittlich 5% der Sieger und 14% der Verl…

Contubernium

(149 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] bedeutete im eigentlichen Sinne des Wortes eine Gemeinschaftsunterkunft von Soldaten; entweder handelte es sich um ein Zeltlager während einer expeditio oder um Baracken in einem ständigen Lager (Tac. ann. 1,41,1). Daraus ergaben sich zwei weitere Wortbedeutungen: Der Begriff wurde auch für eine Gruppe von Soldaten benutzt, die eine Unterkunft teilten, und er bezeichnet außerdem ein daraus entstandenes Gefühl der Zusammengehörigkeit, des Vertrauens und der Solidarität (Suet. Tib. 14,4; Caes. civ. 2,29). Dies schloß auch die Offiziere ein. Das c. scheint ke…

Militärstrafrecht

(475 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] Das im röm. Heer geltende Strafrecht kannte zwei unterschiedliche Kategorien von Vergehen. Die erste Kategorie betraf solche Delikte, die auch im zivilen Bereich geahndet wurden, etwa Diebstahl oder das crimen maiestatis ( maiestas ). Die zweite Kategorie umfaßte die spezifischen Verfehlungen im Militärdienst, vor allem Ungehorsam gegenüber den Vorgesetzten, unerlaubtes Entfernen von der Einheit, Desertion ( desertor ) und Verrat ( perduellio ). Die Zusammensetzung des Militärtribunals sowie die Strafen wandelten sich ent…

Labarum

(196 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] Vor der Schlacht an der Milvischen Brücke ( pons Milvius ) gegen Maxentius 312 n.Chr. erhielt Constantinus I. in einem als Vision bezeichneten Traum den Rat, die ersten beiden Buchstaben des Namens Christus, griech. Chi und Rho (Χ und Ρ), auf die Schilde seiner Soldaten schreiben zu lassen, wenn er siegen wolle: τούτῳ νίκα (“In diesem Zeichen siege”; vgl. Lact. mort. pers. 44; Eus. vita Const. 1,26-31). Dieses Christogramm wurde in der folgenden Zeit an der Spitze einer Standarte befestigt, die aus einer langen La…

Desertor

(268 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] In der röm. Armee wurde als d. betrachtet, wer nicht beim Appell erschien (Liv. 3,69,7), wer sich während einer Schlacht aus der Reichweite des Trompetenschalles entfernte oder wer seine Einheit in Friedenszeiten ohne Erlaubnis, ohne commeatus (Suet. Oth. 11,1; SHA Sept. Sev. 51,5; Dig. 49,16,14), verließ (‘sich von den signa entfernte’). Die Strafen waren unerbittlich: je nach Fall drohte die Sklaverei (Frontin. 4,1,20), die Verstümmelung (SHA Avid. 4, 5) oder der Tod (der Verurteilte wurde mit Ruten geschlagen und daraufhin von dem Tarpeium saxum herabgeworfe…

Decanus

(126 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] Als d. wurde ein Soldat bezeichnet, der ein contubernium befehligte; der d. tauchte in dem Moment auf, als die Stärke dieser Einheit von acht auf zehn Mann erhöht wurde (nach Ps.Hyg.). Die Inschr. IGR I 1046 erwähnt δεκανοί, die entweder Personen dieses Ranges waren oder aber Befehlshaber eines Geschwaders von zehn Schiffen, was nicht mehr genau zu klären ist. Der d. ist noch für das 4. Jh.n.Chr. belegt, manchmal mit dem Titel caput contubernii (Veg. mil. 2,8; 2,13). In anderen Zeugnissen bezeichnet dieser Begriff Personen, die der niedrigsten Stufe d…

Dona militaria

(849 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] Besonders verdienten Soldaten und Offizieren des röm. Heeres wurden Ehrenzeichen verliehen (Auszeichnungen, militärische), wobei der Dienstgrad der Empfänger eine wichtige Rolle spielte. Die Praxis der Verleihung solcher Ehrenzeichen veränderte sich im Verlauf der Republik und der Prinzipatszeit. Von der älteren Überlieferung wurde zwar über die Verleihung von Ehrenzeichen in der Zeit der frühen Republik berichtet (Plin. nat. 22,6-13), aber die ersten glaubwürdigen Hinweise finde…

Accensi

(145 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] Urspr. waren die a. (auch a. velati, “(nur) mit einem Stoffmantel bekleidet”) Armeeangehörige, die zu arm waren, um sich selbst auszurüsten. Sie begleiteten die Legionen und mußten, aufgestellt hinter den anderen Soldaten, in der Schlacht die Gefallenen mit deren Waffen ersetzen (Fest. 369 M; Liv. 8,8,8; Cic. rep. 2,40). Sie wurden entsprechend ihren Einkünften beim census ausgehoben. Seit der Einführung des Solds (nach unserer Überlieferung 406 v. Chr.) erscheinen sie in dieser Form nicht mehr. Der Begriff a. bezeichnete danach einen kleinen, wenig gesch…

Castra

(1,894 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon) | Förtsch, Reinhard (Köln) | Šašel Kos, Marjeta (Ljubljana) | Lombardo, Mario (Lecce) | Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) | Et al.
A. Militärlager [English version] [I 1] Allgemein Die röm. Soldaten sorgten immer dafür, durch Befestigungsanlagen geschützt zu sein. Dies galt auch, wenn sie auf Feldzügen nur für eine Nacht Halt machten. Abends bei der Ankunft mußte das Marschlager errichtet und morgens beim Aufbruch wieder zerstört werden. Der Plural c. bezeichnete jegliche Art von Militärlager, der Singular castrum existierte zwar, wurde im mil. Vokabular jedoch nicht benutzt. Castellum, das auch eine zivile Bed. hatte, ist Diminutiv zu c. (Veg. mil. 3,8). Der Ursprung der röm. Lager liegt im Ungewissen…

Cornicines

(104 words)

Author(s): Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] Die c. gehörten zu den Militärmusikern ( aeneatores), sie spielten auf dem cornu, einem kreisförmig gebogenem Blasinstrument aus Bronze; schwierig ist die Abgrenzung zur bucina. Diese Soldaten wurden unter den ärmsten Bürgern ausgehoben und waren bereits in der Servianischen Centurienordnung vertreten (Liv. 1,43). Allein gaben die c. die Befehle für die Feldzeichen, die Stellung zu wechseln, gemeinsam mit den tubicines die Signale im Kampf (Veg. mil. 2,22;3,5). Unter dem Prinzipat besaßen die c. ein höheres Ansehen als in der Republik, wie ihre Erwäh…
▲   Back to top   ▲