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Marcodurum

(69 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Batavian Revolt Settlement in the western territory of the Ubii, possibly modern Düren or, more probably, Merken near Düren, where the cohortes Ubiorum were destroyed during the uprising of Iulius [II 43] Civilis in AD 69 (Tac. Hist. 4,28,2). Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) Bibliography A. Franke, s.v. M., RE 14, 1680f. C. B. Rüger, Germania Inferior, 1968, 82.

Ubii

(479 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] Germanic tribe (Caes. B Gall. 4,3,3; Tac. Germ. 28,4; Tac. Hist. 4,28,1; 4,64), settled in Caesar's time on the right bank of the Rhine (Rhenus [2]) between the lower La(u)gona (modern Lahn) and Taunus. Displaced by the Suebi, the U. allied with Caesar in 55 BC (Caes. B Gall. 4,8,3; 16,5-8). Caesar's Rhine crossings in 55 and 53 BC probably took place from the Neuwieder Becken in the territory of the U. The history and chronology of their resettlement on the left bank of the Rhine…

Segimundus

(137 words)

Author(s): Losemann, Volker (Marburg/Lahn)
[German version] Son of Segestes, the leader of the Cherusci (Str. 7,1,4). Elected priest of the imperial altar of the Ubii (Ara Ubiorum) in AD 9, he tore up his priest's fillets during Arminius' revolt and fled to the rebels (Tac. Ann. 1,57,2). The priestly office and the altar may be evidence of an Augustean province of Germania; they underline the close cooperation between the Cherusci and the Romans. In AD 15 his father, under siege by Arminius, sent him to seek help from Germanicus [2]. Germa…

Divitia

(109 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] The modern Cologne-Deutz. Starting as a bridgehead across the Rhine opposite  Colonia Agrippinensis [1] early in the 1st cent. AD and rebuilt with a bridge by Constantine the Great to harbour 1,000 men on the Rhine border that is above flood level (Paneg. 6 [7],11,3; 13,1-5); parts of the structure lasted until Frankish times ( Divitia civitas: Greg. Tur. Franc. 4,16). Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography 1 B. Päffgen, W. Zanier, Überlegungen zur Lokalisierung von Oppidum Ubiorum und Legionslager im frühkaiserzeitlichen Köln, in: W. Czysz, C. M. Hüssen et …

Colonia Agrippinensis

(967 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Christianity | | Coloniae | Gallia/Gaul | Commerce | Legio | Limes | Limes | Pertinax | Rome | Rome | Batavian Revolt Present-day Cologne, principal city (Tac. Ann. 1,36,1; 37,2; 71,1) of the Ubii who moved from the Neuwieder Becken to settle in the area previously inhabited by the Eburones, following the deditio by Agrippa in 38 BC (Str. 4,3,4; Tac. Ann. 12,27,1; Germ. 28,4). Located on the gravel plain in the area today known as the old town (archaeology dates the oppidum Ubiorum to around the time of the birth of Christ). Oppidum ( Civ…

Agrippina

(507 words)

Author(s): Kienast, Dietmar (Neu-Esting) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] [1] Vipsania, married to Tiberius from 16-12 BC Vipsania, daughter of M. Vipsanius Agrippa with Caecilia Attica (Nep. Att. 19,4). Born c. 33 BC, married to Tiberius from 16-12 (Suet. Tib. 7,2 f.), whom she bore Drusus Caesar in 15 (Drusus the Younger). Married C. Asinius Gallus after her divorce from Tiberius (Tac. Ann. 1,12; stemma RE 9 A 1232). Died in AD 20 (Tac. Ann. 3,19,3). Kienast, Dietmar (Neu-Esting) Bibliography Raepsat-Charlier 1, no. 811. [German version] [2] Vipsania (A. maior), wife of Germanicus Vipsania (A. maior), daughter of M. Vipsanius Agrip…

Cologne

(8,083 words)

Author(s): Gechter, Marianne (Cologne) | Schütte, Sven (Cologne) | Kreikenbom, Detlev (Mainz RWG)
Gechter, Marianne (Cologne) [German version] I. Post -Antiquity Era (CT) Gechter, Marianne (Cologne) [German version] A. History (CT) Roman rule in Cologne (C.) ended in the middle of the 5th cent. In any case, in 459 C. was in the hands of the Franks. Written sources prove that the transition took place without a great deal of destruction (Amm.15,8; 16,2-3; Salv.gub.6,39; Epistolae 1,5-6). Archaeological evidence, for example, indicates continuous use of the burial ground of St. Severin by the Franks and the Rom…

Vetera

(975 words)

Author(s): Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: | Gallia/Gaul | Legio | Legio | Limes | Limes | Batavian Revolt Roman camp on the Rhine at the 60th milestone downstream from Colonia Agrippinensis (modern Cologne; Tac. Ann. 1,45,1) between the modern towns of Birten and Xanten. The camp originated from the early Imperial period. The name, probably indigenous, refers to an archaeologically unattested earlier settlement nearby (cf. Tac. Hist. 4,18,3: castra quibus Veterum nomen est, 'camp with the name V.', quite often in accounts of the Batavian Revolt; Ptol.…

Ruler cult

(1,133 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
[German version] The cultic worship of the emperor during his lifetime and after his death, namely as a deity and part of the municipal pantheon, was as such the Roman Imperial version of ruler cult already commonly practised amongst the Hellenistic kings. Like the ruler cult, emperor worship was seen from the perspective of the towns as an expression of political ties and political self-definition. From the ruler’s point of view, it was a means of safeguarding his power symbolically. Greek ruler cult can traced back solely to neither the Middle East nor the Greek hero cult…

Agrippa

(1,444 words)

Author(s): Kienast, Dietmar (Neu-Esting) | Frede, Michael (Oxford) | Hübner, Wolfgang (Münster) | Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum)
According to modern etymology, the name derives from *agrei-pod-, ‘having the feet in front’ (according to Leumann, 398, ‘very dubious’). Originally a praenomen (thus still in the Iulii, especially A. Postumus), then a cognomen in the families of the Antonii, Asinii, Cassii(?), Fonteii, Furii, Haterii, Helvii, Iulii, Lurii, Menenii, Vibuleni, Vipsanii, but also of Jewish kings ( Herodes A.). Documented as name of various persons. Kienast, Dietmar (Neu-Esting) [German version] [1] M. Vipsanius, consul 37, 28, 27 BC M. Vipsanius, born 64/3 BC, of knightly lineage, probabl…

Munatius

(2,051 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Frigo, Thomas (Bonn) | Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Matthaios, Stephanos (Cologne)
[German version] A. (Roman) Name of a Roman plebeian family, of which the branch of the Planci acquired political significance in the 1st century BC. Its most prominent member is M. [I 4], cos. in 42 BC. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) I. Republican period [German version] [I 1] M. Flaccus, L. Took part in an attempt on the life of Cassius Longinus in 48 BC From Hispania Baetica; he escaped after a failed attempt on the life of the Q. Cassius [I 16] Longinus, a follower of Caesar's, in Corduba in 48 BC (Bell. Alex. 52,3f.). In 46/5 as a follower of the younger…

Legio

(5,549 words)

Author(s): Campbell, J. Brian (Belfast)
[German version] A. Republic In early times, the Roman military contingent probably consisted of 3,000 soldiers in total, each of the three tribus of the royal era providing 1,000 men (Varro, Ling. 5,89) - a military force described as ‘the levy’ ( legio). The division of the Roman people into six classes of wealth, ascribed by historiographical tradition to Servius Tullius (Liv. 1,42,4-43,13; Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 4,15-18) also had a military purpose: a citizen's assets dictated with which weapons he was to equip himself. Those without property ( capite censi) were excluded from mili…

Limes

(12,382 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) | Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) | Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) | Schön, Franz (Regensburg) | Et al.
[German version] I. General In the religious and administrative theory of the land surveyors, the Latin word limes denoted the path marking the boundary between two pieces of land, while in military and political usage (Tac. Ann. 1,50; Frontin. Str. 1,3,10) it meant the border between Roman and non-Roman territory (SHA Hadr. 12). Over recent years, research has led the military connotation of the term limes, which has been used almost exclusively from the 19th cent., to be expanded to comprehend also the historico-geographical and socio-economic fields. Where the limites were origin…

Claudius

(10,704 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Will, Wolfgang (Bonn) | Kierdorf, Wilhelm (Cologne) | Eck, Werner (Cologne) | Birley, A. R. (Düsseldorf) | Et al.
Name of a Roman lineage (Sabine Clausus, with the vernacular variant of   Clodius , esp. in the 1st cent. BC). The Claudii supposedly immigrated to Rome from the Sabine city of Regillum at the beginning of the republic in 504 BC under their ancestor Att(i)us Clausus ( Appius) and were immediately accepted into the circle of patrician families (Liv. 2,16,4-6), which explains why the early members received the invented epithets of Inregillensis C. [I 5-6] and Sabinus C. [I 31-32], [1. 155f.]. The praenomen Appius came to signify the family. Named after them was the Tribus Claudi…