Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Renger, Johannes (Berlin)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Renger, Johannes (Berlin)" )' returned 174 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Cookery books

(807 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Schmitt-Pantel, Pauline (Paris)
[German version] I. Near East and Egypt Although there is copious epigraphical and graphic evidence for a highly developed  table culture at the courts of oriental rulers in antiquity, cooking recipes are known to us so far only from Mesopotamia: 34 from the 18th cent. BC (gathered from three clay tablets), one from the 6th/5th cents. BC. They offer practical instructions in the manner of medical prescriptions. The reason why the recipes were preserved in writing is not clear. They deal predominantly with stewed poultry and other meat, together with two recipes…

Kinship, Relatives

(1,915 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | di Mattia, Margherita (Rome)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient and Egypt Both Sumerian and Akkadian kinship terms - other than basic words like father (Sumerian a.a, Akkadian abu), mother (Sumerian ama, Akkadian ummu), son (Sumerian dumu, Akkadian māru), daughter (Sumerian dumu.munus, ‘female son’, Akkadian mārtu), brother (Sumerian šeš, Akkadian aḫu), sister (Sumerian nin, Akkadian aḫātu, ‘female brother’) - are of an analytical character (e.g. Akkadian abi abi or abi ummi, paternal or maternal grandfather; father's brother = uncle). In Sumerian, šeš.bànda (literally ‘little brother’) …

Husbandry

(3,460 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Jameson, Michael (Stanford) | Jongman, Willem (Groningen)
(Animal) [German version] I. Ancient Orient In the Ancient Orient and Egypt animal husbandry was always systemically linked with agricultural production (farming), insofar as both were mutually dependent and together formed the basis for society's subsistence. That view was given expression (i.a.) in the Sumerian polemical poem ‘Mother ewe and grain’ [1]. In Mesopotamia the basis of animal husbandry was mainly the keeping of herds of  sheep and to a lesser extent of  goats, which were collectively termed ‘domestic livestock’ (Sumerian u8.udu-ḫia; Akkadian ṣēnu). Sheep were pri…

Storage economy

(2,351 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Schneider, Helmuth (Kassel) | Corbier, Mireille (Paris)
[German version] I. Ancient Near East The creation of stores, esp. of less perishable foodstuffs (esp. grain), is essential to the existence of societies whose agriculture is strongly exposed to environmental and political risks. The paradigm for such experiences is found in the OT story, referring to ancient Egypt, of the seven 'fat' and seven 'lean' years (Gn 41:25-36). The economy (I.) of Mesopotamia, centralized from the 4th millennium BC, also had a central SE, but it is known only from texts. In…

Oikos economy

(680 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] Oikos economy (OE) was first described as an idealised concept of a form of economy in antiquity by Rodbertus, later by M. Weber. Oikos describes an independent household (of a ruler), which produces everything used and consumed in it, apart from a few exceptions (metals, luxury products, in Mesopotamia also wood). In the Mesopotamian OE of the 4th and 3rd millennia, which had developed under the conditions of a comprehensive and mostly centrally-organized regime of artificial irrigation of the cultivab…

Cattle

(2,971 words)

Author(s): Raepsaet, Georges (Brüssel) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Nissen, Hans Jörg (Berlin) | Jameson, Michael (Stanford)
[German version] I. General information Cattle ( Bos taurus) belong to the bovine family and are descended from the Eurasian big-horned aurochs ( Bos primigenius). Longhorn wild cattle were most likely domesticated in Central Asia between 10,000 to 8,000 BC and in the Near East around 7,000 to 6,000 BC. In the 3rd millennium BC various breeds of domesticated cattle spread throughout Europe. Herds of wild cattle still existed in the forested regions of the eastern Mediterranean, such as Dardania and Thrace (Varro, Rust. 2,1,5), as well as in Central Europe (Caes. B Gall. 6,28). In antiquit…

Oils for cooking

(2,001 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Schneider, Helmuth (Kassel)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient and Egypt In the Ancient Orient and Egypt, oil was not only part of human nutrition (e.g. the daily rations for the population dependent on central institutions), but was also used as body oil, for making scent, for embalming (in Egypt), for medicinal purposes, in craft production, as lamp oil and in the cultic and ritual sphere (e.g. unction for rulers in Israel: 1 Sam 10,1; 16,3; not in Mesopotamia). Depending on the regionally varying agronomic and climatic conditions, oil was obtained from a number of plants: whereas numerous olei…

Empires, Concept of empire

(1,874 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient The idea of a  rulership that encompassed the entire known world was expressed in Mesopotamia in various royal epithets ─ i.a. ‘Ruler of the Four Regions (of the world)’ ( šar kibrāt arbaim/erbettim), ‘Ruler over the Totality’ ( šar kiššatim), ‘Ruler of Rulers’ ( šar šarrāni). The title ‘Ruler of the Four Regions (of the world)’ is first documented for the Akkadian ruler  Naramsin (23rd cent. BC). However, the claim inherent in this title did not hold true according to contemporary documents, since Naramsin's…

Amulet

(478 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Grieshammer, Reinhard (Heidelberg)
[German version] A. Ancient Orient Since prehistoric times in the Ancient Orient there have been numerous objects made as pendants (either figurative or abstract symbols) which could be worn, tied on or hung and also chains or other arrangements, which were all referred to as amulets [1]. Particularly Akkadian and Hittite texts for experts in the area of magic rituals describe materials, shapes and the process for making amulets and the purpose for which they are used. Stones and plants are ascribed …

Universal language

(1,092 words)

Author(s): Binder, Vera (Gießen) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] I. General points The term UL today conveys two meanings: (1) an artificially created language, intended to serve as a lingua franca for the entire world; efforts of this kind were made especially in the 19th cent. (e.g. Esperanto and Volapük); yet, as might be expected, they fell behind their self-imposed goal. (2) A language actually in world-wide use today is, above all, English. In the wake of the colonial period, it has established itself on all continents at least as a subsidiary means of commun…

Tiamat

(103 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] (Akkadian 'sea'). Primaeval/primordial female divine monster, known from the Babylonian creation myth Enūma Eliš . She is killed by her son Marduk in a theomachy (matricide) and split lengthwise into two halves: from the lower half he creates the earth, from the upper half the firmament of the heavens. In Berosus [1. 15] T. appears in a corrupt form as thalath (Gr. thálassa, 'sea'). T. is reflected in the Biblical creation myth (Gn 1:2) as tehōm (LXX: ábyssos, literally 'bottomless', 'primaeval depth'). Renger, Johannes (Berlin) Bibliography 1 S. M. Burstein, The …

Adamas

(81 words)

Author(s): Peter, Ulrike (Berlin) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
(Ἀδάμας). [English version] [1] Thraker (4.Jh. v. Chr.) Thraker, der in den 370er Jahren v. Chr. von Kotys abfiel (Aristot. pol. 5,10,1311b). Die Identifizierung mit A. in IG XII 5,245 ist zweifelhaft (SEG 34, 1984, 856). Peter, Ulrike (Berlin) [English version] [2] Fluß Vorderindiens Nur bei Ptol. 7,1,17; 41 erwähnter Fluß Vorderindiens am Golf von Bengalen, mit der jetzigen Subarna rekha identisch. Der Name bedeutet “Diamantenfluß”. Landeinwärts sind bis heute die Diamantgruben von Chota Nagpur bekannt. Renger, Johannes (Berlin)

Polytheismus

(1,196 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
I. Allgemein und Klassische Antike [English version] 1. Begriffsgeschichte Das Adj. πολύθεος/ polýtheos bezeichnet in der griech. Dichtersprache das, was einer Mehrzahl von Göttern zukommt: der Altar als Sitz ( hédra) vieler Gottheiten (Aischyl. Suppl. 424) oder die von einer großen Zahl besuchte Götterversammlung (Lukian. Iuppiter Tragoedus 14). Erst die jüd. und christl. Lit. (Apologien) verwendet das Begriffsfeld zur Rechtfertigung der Herrschaft ( monarchía) eines einzigen Gottes: Philon [12] von Alexandreia prägt δόξα πολύθεος/ dóxa polýtheos (Phil. de decalogo 65…

Lein, Flachs

(871 words)

Author(s): Pekridou-Gorecki, Anastasia (Frankfurt/Main) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] I. Allgemeines L. (λίνον/ línon, lat. linum) oder Flachs gehört der Gattung der Storchschnabelgewächse an. Als Stammpflanze des kultivierten L. gilt das linum angustifolium. Der Gebrauch dieser wildwachsenden, perennierenden Pflanze ist schon für die neolithische Zeit in Europa arch. nachgewiesen. Der echte L. ( linum usitatissimum), eine einjährige Pflanze, hat einen feinen Stengel mit länglichen ungestielten Blättern und erreicht eine Höhe von 60-90 cm. Die Stengel bilden den Rohstoff, aus dem das nach der Wolle wichtigst…

Issedones

(66 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Treidler, Hans (Berlin)
[English version] (Ἰσσηδόνες, Ἰσσηδοί, Ἐσσηδόνες). Skythisches Volk asiatischer Herkunft. Nach Hdt. (1,201; 4,13-26) südöstl. des Aralsees zu lokalisieren; der Schwerpunkt ihrer Wohngebiete lag aber in Mittelasien. Ptolemaios (6,16,5; 16,7; 8,24,3; 24,5 N) rechnet ihnen die im chinesischen Ost-Turkestan (Tarimbecken) an der Seidenstraße gelegenen Städte Ἰσσηδὼν Σκυθική (h. Kutscha) u. Ἰσσηδὼν Σηρική (h. Tscharchlik) südwestlich des Lobnor zu. Skythai Renger, Johannes (Berlin) Treidler, Hans (Berlin)

Lied

(1,275 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Fuhrer, Therese (Zürich)
[English version] I. Alter Orient Zahlreiche L.-Gattungen sind in Mesopot. (seit ca. 2600 v.Chr.), in Äg. (seit dem 24./23. Jh.v.Chr.), bei den Hethitern (14./13. Jh.), aus Ugarit (14./13. Jh.) und dem AT (s.u.) bezeugt. Die gattungsmäßige Zuordnung wird uneinheitlich gehandhabt, da sich häufig Mischformen finden. Die ant. Nomenklatur ist nur bedingt hilfreich. Die als Oberbegriff verwendete Bezeichnung “Kultlyrik” bezieht sich auf die lit., d.h. lyrische Form der L. Die Bezeichnung “Lied” orientiert…

Kallipolis

(419 words)

Author(s): Kaletsch, Hans (Regensburg) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Treidler, Hans (Berlin) | von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) | Lombardo, Mario (Lecce) | Et al.
(Καλλίπολις). [English version] [1] Ort in Karia Ort in Karia (Arr. an. 2,5,7; Steph. Byz. s.v. Κ.), Lage umstritten: entweder bei h. Gelibolu, südl. des Ostendes des Keramischen Golfs (ant. und ma. Reste, keine Siedlungsfunde) oder östl. davon, 10 km landeinwärts bei Duran Çiftlik (Reste eines ant. Heiligtums und einer Kirche; die Siedlung dazu 1,5 km östl. von Kızılkaya, Steinkistengräber an der Ostseite des Hügels). Bis zur Niederlage im Kampf gegen Ptolemaios und Asandros 333 v.Chr. konnte der Pers…

Nimbus

(1,386 words)

Author(s): Willers, Dietrich (Bern) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Quack, Joachim (Berlin)
[English version] [1] Nimbus vitreus N. vitreus (“gläserne Wolke”), ein Wortspiel Martials (14,112), das seit Friedländers Erläuterungen [1. 322] zumeist und bis in jüngste Komm. [2. 174] mißverstanden wird und als ‘gläsernes Sprenggefäß mit zahlreichen Öffnungen’ übers. wird. Gemeint ist die Wirkung eines solchen Instruments, wenn Wein versprüht wird. Willers, Dietrich (Bern) Bibliography 1 L. Friedländer (ed.), M. Valerii Martialis epigrammaton libri (mit erklärenden Anm.), Bd. 2, 1886 2 T.J. Leary (ed.), Martial Book XIV. The Apophoreta, 1996 (mit Einführun…

Geld, Geldwirtschaft

(6,043 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | von Reden, Sitta (Bristol) | Crawford, Michael Hewson (London) | Morrisson, Cécile (Paris) | Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[English version] I. Alter Orient und Ägypten Bereits zu Beginn des 3. Jt. v.Chr. haben Metalle (Kupfer und Silber, später auch Zinn und Gold) die G.-Funktionen als Tauschmittel oder Tauschvermittler, Zahlungsmittel für rel., rechtliche oder sonstige Verpflichtungen, Wertmesser und Schatzmittel erfüllt. Daneben haben bis ins 1. Jt. vertretbare Güter, v.a. Getreide, als Tauschmittel und Wertmesser gedient. Wirtschaft im vorderen Orient und Ägypten war durch Subsistenzproduktion, autarke Palast- und Oiko…

Priester

(3,742 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Niehr, Herbert (Tübingen) | Haas, Volkert (Berlin) | Gordon, Richard L. (Ilmmünster) | Et al.
[English version] I. Mesopotamien Das Personal mesopot. Tempel setzte sich seit dem 3. Jt. bis ans Ende der mesopot. Zivilisation aus dem Kultpersonal im engeren Sinn - d. h. den P. und P.innen, die den offiziellen Kult in den Tempeln besorgten, den Kultmusikanten und Sängern - sowie dem Dienstpersonal (Hofreinigern und Hofreinigerinnen, Köchen usw.) zusammen. Hinzu kam das hierarchisch gegliederte Verwaltungs- und Wirtschaftspersonal der Tempel-Haushalte, die in Babylonien große Wirtschaftseinheite…

Hortikultur

(1,931 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Christmann, Eckhard (Heidelberg)
[English version] I. Alter Orient und Ägypten In den Nutzgärten im vorderen Orient und Äg. wurden im sog. Stockwerksbau unter dem schattenspendenden Dach der Dattelpalmen Obstbäume (v.a. Apfel, Feige, Granatapfel; dazu in Äg. Johannisbrotbaum, Jujube; Obstbau) und darunter Gemüse (v.a. Zwiebel- und Gurkengewächse, Hülsenfrüchte, Blattgemüse wie Kresse, sowie Gewürzkräuter, z.B. Koriander, Thymian, Kümmel, Minze) angebaut. Die Dattelpalme lieferte nicht nur Datteln als wichtigstes Süßmittel, sondern auc…

Hieros Gamos

(786 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Princeton) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
(ἱερὸς γάμος, Heilige Hochzeit). [English version] I. Begriff Ein Terminus, der zur Bezeichnung einer rituellen sexuellen Vereinigung in der neuzeitlichen Forsch. seit dem Aufkommen des Fruchtbarkeitsparadigmas im 19. Jh. (Mannhardt, Frazer) eine große Bed. erlangt hat. Ausgehend von dem im homer. Epos erzählten Geschlechtsverkehr zwischen Demeter und ihrem sterblichen Liebhaber Iasion ‘auf einem dreimal gepflügten Feld’ (Hom. Od. 5, 125-128; Hes. theog. 969-971), der in Analogie mit nordeurop. Bräuchen…

Religion

(12,041 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Assmann, Jan (Heidelberg) | Podella, Thomas (Lübeck) | Colpe, Carsten (Berlin) | Et al.
I. Einleitung [English version] A. Bestimmung des Begriffs Als substantivistischer Terminus der rel. Selbstbeschreibung bezeichnet “R.” ein System von gemeinsamen Praktiken, individuellen Glaubensvorstellungen, kodifizierten Normen und theologischen Erklärungsmustern, dessen Gültigkeit zumeist auf ein autoritatives Prinzip oder Wesen zurückgeführt wird. Für die R.-Wissenschaft ist der R.-Begriff dagegen eine rein heuristische Kategorie, mit der jene Praktiken, Vorstellungen, Normen und theologischen Kon…

Rind

(2,724 words)

Author(s): Raepsaet, Georges (Brüssel) | Nissen, Hans Jörg (Berlin) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Jameson, Michael (Stanford)
[English version] I. Allgemein Das R. ( Bos taurus) gehört zu den bovidae und stammt von dem eurasischen, großhornigen Ur ( Bos primigenius) ab. Die Domestikation von langhornigen Wildrindern erfolgte in Zentralasien wahrscheinlich 10000 bis 8000 v. Chr. und im Vorderen Orient gegen 7000-6000 v. Chr. Im 3. Jt. v. Chr. verbreiteten sich in Europa verschiedene Rassen des Hausrindes. Bestände von Wildrindern existierten noch in Waldregionen des östlichen Mittelmeerraumes, so in Dardania und Thrakien (Varro rust. 2,1,5) sowie in Mitteleuropa (Caes. Gall. 6,28). In der Ant. wurden…

Opfer

(9,655 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Haas, Volkert (Berlin) | Podella, Thomas (Lübeck) | Et al.
I. Religionswissenschaftlich [English version] A. Allgemeines Das O. gehört zu den zentralen Begriffen für die Selbstbeschreibung von Ritual-Rel. in ant. und mod. Kulturen. Der O.-Begriff schließt in der europäischen Moderne oft (darin direkt oder indirekt von der christl. Theologie des die Menschen erlösenden O.-Todes Jesu Christi beinflußt) das Moment der individuellen Selbsthingabe (“Aufopferung”) ein. Die Spannbreite der mod. Bedeutungsnuancen reicht dabei bis zu den nicht mehr rel., sondern nun m…

Latage

(33 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] Nach Ail. nat. 16,10 indische Stadt im Land der Prasioi, bei deren König der Grieche Megasthenes Gesandter war. Renger, Johannes (Berlin) Bibliography O. Wecker, s.v. L. (2), RE 12, 892.

Markt

(1,815 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | von Reden, Sitta (Bristol) | Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[English version] I. Alter Orient und Ägypten Das Konzept des M.s wird in der Altorientalistik und der Ägyptologie kontrovers diskutiert, da es weder im mesopot. Raum noch in Äg. ein Wort dafür gab, das eindeutig den M. als Ort und als Operationsmodus bezeichnet. Hintergrund der Diskussion sind auf der einen Seite die von K. Polanyi inspirierten Forsch. zu vormod. Gesellschaften (u.a. für die klass. Welt von M. Finley), wonach ein M. als ein System von Angebot und Nachfrage mit dem Resultat von Preisbi…

Familie

(6,726 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Feucht, Erika (Heidelberg) | Macuch, Maria (Berlin) | Gehrke, Hans-Joachim (Freiburg) | Deißmann-Merten, Marie-Luise (Freiburg) | Et al.
[English version] I. Alter Orient Die F. in Mesopot. war patrilinear organisiert; Reste von matrilinearen F.-Strukturen finden sich in hethit. Mythen, bei den amoritischen Nomaden des frühen 2. Jt. v.Chr. sowie den arab. Stämmen des 7. Jh. v.Chr. In der Regel herrschte Monogamie; Heirat mit Nebenfrauen minderen Rechts war möglich, Polygamie ist v.a. in den Herrscher-F. bezeugt. Die F. bestand aus dem Elternpaar und seinen Kindern, über deren Zahl keine verläßlichen Angaben möglich sind. Unverheiratete Brüder des F.-Oberhauptes konnten Teil der F. sein. Die Funktion der F. al…

Liste

(566 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Cavigneaux, Antoine (Genf)
[English version] A. Definition Die L. ist eine graphisch-sprachliche Technik zur Darstellung von Sachverhalten und Konzepten unterschiedlicher Komplexität. Sie stellt Sachverhalte herausgelöst aus ihrem schriftlich oder mündlich vorliegenden (narrativen/beschreibenden) Kontext asyntaktisch und enumerativ dar. L. können ausschließlich - mit einem Anspruch auf Vollständigkeit - bzw. offen sein. Neben einfachen L. (Aneinanderreihung von Begriffen und/ oder Zahlen in einer Kolumne oder Zeile bzw. Reihe…

Bevölkerung, Bevölkerungsgeschichte

(2,605 words)

Author(s): Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] A. Forschungsgegenstand und Methode Gegenstand der B.s-Geschichte ist die Beschreibung und Erklärung von Strukturen und Entwicklungen von (ant.) B. in ihrem Verhältnis zum Lebensraum. Ausgehend von qualitativ und/oder quantitativ auswertbaren, aber nicht unproblematischen ant. Zeugnissen sowie unter Berücksichtigung moderner Modellsterbetafeln und ethnologischen Vergleichmaterials hat die B.s-Geschichte der Ant. bislang vor allem die ant. Sicht der B.s-Entwicklung, die zahlenmäßige …

Bisutun

(337 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel)
[English version] (altpers. bagastāna “Götterplatz”, Βαγίστανα, Βαγίστανον ὄρος, Behistun). Felswand 30 km östl. von Kermanschah an der Straße von Babylon nach Ekbatana am Choaspes (Seidenstraße [3. 11]), an der Dareios I. seine Taten seit ca. 520 v.Chr. bildlich und inschr. - ca. 70 m über dem Straßenniveau - in mehreren Phasen festhalten ließ. Wegen ihrer dreisprachigen Form (elam., babylon., altpers.) bildete die Inschr. [1] die Grundlage für die Entzifferung der Keilschrift (Trilingue). Das Rel…

Kriegsbeute

(1,470 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basel) | Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] I. Alter Orient Im Alten Orient galt das Aufbringen von K. der Versorgung mit wichtigen Rohstoffen (z.B. Metallen Äg.: Gold aus Nubien, Silber aus Kilikien, Kupfer aus Zypern (MR); Assyrien: Eisen aus Iran, Silber aus Kilikien; Kilikes, Kilikia) und für die weitere Kriegsführung benötigten Objekten (z.B. Pferde, Streitwagen im Assyrien des 1. Jt.v.Chr.) oder diente zur Versorgung der königl. Hofhaltung mit Luxusgütern zu Prestigezwecken. K. ist von Tributleistungen zu unterscheiden,…

Oikos-Wirtschaft

(597 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] Als idealtypisches Konzept einer Wirtschaftsform des Alt. wurde die O. zuerst von Rodbertus, später von M. Weber beschrieben: Als Oikos wird der autarke Haushalt (eines Herrschers) bezeichnet, in dem alles, was innerhalb des Oikos gebraucht und konsumiert wird, bis auf wenige Ausnahmen (Metalle, Luxusprodukte, in Mesopotamien auch Hölzer) selbst erzeugt wird. In der mesopot. O. des 4. und 3. Jt., die sich unter den Bedingungen eines umfassenden, weitgehend zentral organisierten R…

Punt

(437 words)

Author(s): Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] [1] Land in Afrika Äg. pwn.t, ab dem NR durch sprachliche Neuanalyse als p-wn.t aufgefaßt, woraus unter Weglassung des scheinbaren Artikels ein neuer Name wn.t kreiert wird, der in einigen Quellen aus griech.-röm. Zeit erscheint. Nach äg. Quellen ein Land im fernen SO; h. meist im Bereich von Būr Sūdān (Port Sudan) [6] oder um Eritrea und das Horn von Afrika [1; 2] gesucht. Im AR könnten Handelsgüter aus P. über Zwischenstationen entlang des Nils nach Äg. gelangt sein, auch direkte Handelsfahrten sind …

Antiocheia

(1,432 words)

Author(s): Wittke, Anne-Maria (Tübingen) | Leisten, Thomas (Princeton) | Wagner, Jörg (Tübingen) | Tomaschitz, Kurt (Wien) | Weiß, Peter (Kiel) | Et al.
[English version] [1] am Orontes Als Antigoneia am Orontes 307 v. Chr. gegr., nach der Niederlage von Antigonos I. gegen Seleukos I. Nikator bei Ipsos (301 v. Chr.) von diesem zu Ehren seines Vaters Antiochos 300 v. Chr. an die Stelle des heutigen Antakya (Türkei) verlegt und in A. umbenannt. Hauptstadt des Seleukidenreiches; entwickelte sich unter den Seleukiden durch Zusammenschluß mehrerer Siedlungen zur Tetrapolis mit je eigener Umfassungsmauer. Dank der Lage als Verkehrsknotenpunkt im uralten Ku…

Garten

(2,228 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Carroll-Spillecke, Maureen (Köln) | Egelhaaf-Gaiser, Ulrike (Potsdam)
[English version] [1] Gartenbau s. Hortikultur Renger, Johannes (Berlin) [2] Garten, Gartenanlagen [English version] I. Alter Orient und Ägypten In unmittelbarer Nähe der Wohnhäuser waren G. wichtig als Spender von Schatten für Mensch und Vieh. Lust-G. als Teil von Palastanlagen dienten zudem dem Prestige, als Teil von Tempelanlagen symbolisierten sie kosmisches Geschehen. Ein myth. Konstrukt ist der G. Eden (Gn 2,8; 2,15). G. werden auf Reliefs (Assyrien) und Wandgemälden (Ägypten) dargestellt. Assyr. Könige beri…

Rationen

(469 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Schneider, Helmuth (Kassel)
[English version] I. Alter Orient In der altorientalischen Oikos- oder Palastwirtschaft waren - je nach Region und Epoche - die Mehrheit oder (große) Teile der Bevölkerung in die institutionellen Haushalte von Tempel und/oder Palast als direkt Abhängige integriert. Sie wurden durch Natural-R. (Getreide, Öl, Wolle), die das für ihre Reproduktion nötige Existenzminimum garantierten, versorgt. In Mesopotamien wurden diese Natural-R. durch Zuweisung von Unterhaltsfeldern (ca. 6 ha), die das Existenzminimum einer Familie sicherstellten, partiell supplem…

Handel

(7,587 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Briese, Christoph (Randers) | Bieg, Gebhard (Tübingen) | de Souza, Philip (Twickenham) | Drexhage, Hans-Joachim (Marburg) | Et al.
[English version] I. Alter Orient (Ägypten, Vorderasien, Indien) Fern- oder Überland-H. - im Gegensatz zu Austausch und Allokation von Gütern des tägl. Bedarfs auf lokaler Ebene -, im Alten Orient arch. seit dem Neolithikum, in Texten seit dem 3. Jt. v.Chr. belegt, beruhte auf der Notwendigkeit, die Versorgung mit sog. strategischen Gütern (Metallen, Bauholz) sicherzustellen, die im eigenen Territorium nicht vorhanden waren, sowie auf dem Bedürfnis nach Luxus- und Prestigegütern bzw. den dafür benötigten Materialien. In histor. Zeit lag die Organisation des H. in der …

Mitra

(356 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] [1] Teil der Rüstung (μίτρα, μίτρη). (1) Nach Homer (Hom. Il. 4,137; 187; 216; 5,857) zum Schutz des Unterleibes getragener Teil der Rüstung, der von der arch. Forsch. mit bes. auf Kreta gefundenen, halbkreisförmigen Bronzeblechen der früharcha. Zeit identifiziert wird. Ebenfalls m. heißt das in seiner Funktion entsprechende Rüstungsteil der Salier (Salii; Dion. Hal. ant. 2,70; Plut. Numa 13,4). (2) Gürtel der jungen Frauen (Theokr. 27,55, vgl. μιτροχίτων/ mitrochítōn, Athen. 12,523d) und Göttinnen (Kall. h. 1,120; 4,222, epigr. 39), nach einer s…

Ergasterion

(908 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Burford-Cooper, Alison (Ann Arbor)
[English version] I. Alter Orient In den Palastwirtschaften ( oíkos-Wirtschaften) des Alten Orients wurden bestimmte Massenprodukte für den Eigenbedarf patrimonialer (Groß)Haushalte, aber auch für den Austausch im Fernhandel in großen Ergateria (Manufakturen) hergestellt, in denen oft mehrere hundert, bisweilen weit über tausend männliche oder weibliche Arbeitskräfte beschäftigt waren. Ihre Entlohnung erfolgte in der Regel durch tägliche Naturalrationen; ihr sozialer Status war der von dienstpflichtigen …

Maße

(1,823 words)

Author(s): Sallaberger, Walther (Leipzig) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) | Schulzki, Heinz-Joachim (Mannheim)
[English version] I. Alter Orient Auch wenn die einzelnen grundlegenden M.-Systeme, Längen-, Hohl-Maße und Gewichte, unabhängig voneinander entstanden und definiert sind, so wurden doch zumindest in Mesopot. wechselseitige Relationen etabliert. Die Bezeichnungen für Längen-M. beruhen im Alten Orient wie anderswo auf Körperteilen (Elle, Hand- und Fingerbreite), während der Fuß hier nicht begegnet. Zudem sind regionale und zeitliche Differenzen zu berücksichtigen. Die babylon. “Elle” (sumer. kùš, akkad. ammatu, üblicherweise ca. 50 cm; im 1. Jt.v.Chr. daneben di…

Reinheit

(1,187 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Podella, Thomas (Lübeck)
[English version] I. Mesopotamien Das Prinzip (kultischer) R. wird im Sumerischen durch das Adj. kug, im Akkadischen durch das korrespondierende Adj. ellu ausgedrückt. In beiden Wörtern ist auch die Nuance “hell”, “leuchtend” enthalten. Mit sumer. kug bzw. akkad. ellu (wenn in textueller Abhängigkeit von kug) werden die Eigenschaften von Gottheiten, Örtlichkeiten (u. a. Tempel), (Kult-)Objekten, Riten bzw. Zeiträumen als zur Sphäre des Göttlichen gehörig bezeichnet, d. h. heißt aber nicht unbedingt, daß sie sich in einem Zustand fre…

Gebet

(2,606 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) | Ego, Beate (Osnabrück) | Graf, Fritz (Princeton)
I. Alter Orient [English version] A. Allgemeines Aus dem Alten Orient sind seit dem 3. Jt. v.Chr. mehrere hundert G. überliefert, deren Textgesch. sich z.T. über viele Jh. verfolgen läßt. Diverse Gattungen, gemeinhin als Klagen, Hymnen usw. klassifiziert, sind im eigentlichen Sinn G., denn Klage bzw. hymnischer Preis der Gottheit sind nur Anlaß bzw. Ausgangspunkt eines am Ende des Textes stehenden - und so dessen Sitz im Leben ausmachenden - G. Renger, Johannes (Berlin) [English version] B. Ägypten Anrufungen von Göttern mit folgender Bitte für sich selbst oder Fürbitte …

Ištar

(160 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] Die semit. Göttin I. ist etym. mit Astarte ( Aṯtarat) zu verbinden; gramm. ist der Name mask. (zu vergleichen mit west-semit. Aṯtar). Im südl. Mesopot. wurde sie mit der sumer. Stadtgöttin von Uruk, Inanna, gleichgesetzt, ihre Verehrung dort ist bis in achäm. Zeit bezeugt. Im nördl. Babylonien und Assyrien wurden I.-Gestalten in zahlreichen Städten verehrt (I. der Stadt NN; u.a. der Städte Akkad, Arbela [1], Niniveh) und z.T. mit anderen Göttinen gleichgesetzt. Daraus ist zu erklären, daß der Name als Ištar(t)u in Mesopot. als genereller Terminus für Göttin …

Enlil

(56 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] (sumer. “Herr Wind”). Stadtgott von Nippur und höchster Gott des sumer.-akkad. Pantheons im 3. und in der 1. H. des 2. Jt.v.Chr., an dessen Stelle im 1. Jt. Marduk, der Stadtgott von Babylon getreten ist. Seine Gemahlin ist Ninlil (Mylissa). Marduk; Mesopotamien; Nippur Renger, Johannes (Berlin) Bibliography T. Jacobsen, Treasures from Darkness, 1976.

Geheimpolizei

(541 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Eder, Walter (Bochum)
[English version] A. Alter Orient Von verdeckten Informanten, den ‘Augen und Ohren des Königs’, die dem Perserkönig Nachrichten zutrugen, berichtet Xenophon (Kyr. 8,2,10ff.). Vorläufer dieser achäm. “Institution” finden sich im mesopot. Bereich, wonach sich etwa Opferschauer (Mari 18. Jh. v.Chr.) oder Funktionsträger des Staates (Assyrien 8./7. Jh.) im Amtseid verpflichten, dem König gegen ihn gerichtete Bestrebungen und Handlungen zu melden. Wie sehr die Furcht vor den ‘Augen und Ohren des Königs’ d…

Genealogie

(881 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt)
Die G. als Ableitung der Herkunft in Form von Ahnenreihen ist in frühen, stark von Familienverbänden geprägten Gesellschaften ein häufig verwendetes Mittel der Legitimation und (pseudohistor.) Erinnerung und zielt immer auch auf eine Öffentlichkeit (G. von griech. γενεαλογεῖν “die [eigene] Herkunft erzählen”). [English version] I. Vorderer Orient und Ägypten Die in Form von G. überlieferte Abstammung (in der Regel patrilinear; Ausnahmen bei äg. Herrschern) sollte Ansprüche auf Herrschaft, Besitzstand im Amt (Priester, hohe Beamte), Status im B…

Potamophylax

(74 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] (ποταμοφύλαξ, “Flußwächter”). Die potamophýlakes (ptolem. Amt) bewachten mittels Wachbooten (belegt seit dem 2. Jh. v. Chr.) den Nil, die Nilarme (im Delta) und die Kanäle von Alexandreia bis Syene (Assuan), zuweilen beförderten sie auch eilige Briefe und wurden zum Eintreiben von Zöllen und Steuern eingesetzt. Die p. wurden für ihren Dienst konskribiert; das Amt des p. war eine Liturgie. Renger, Johannes (Berlin) Bibliography E. Kießling, s. v. P., RE 22, 1029 f.

Amulett

(410 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Grieshammer, Reinhard (Heidelberg)
[English version] A. Alter Orient Im Alten Orient finden sich seit prähistor. Zeit zahlreiche als Anhänger geformte und zum Anlegen, Umbinden oder Aufhängen geeignete Objekte (figürlich oder symbolhaft-abstrakt), Ketten oder sonstige Gebinde, die allg. als A. gedeutet werden [1]. Vor allem akkad. und hethit. Texte aus dem Bereich der Experten für magische Rituale beschreiben Material, Gestalt und den Prozeß des Anfertigens von Amuletten und den Zweck, für den sie gebraucht werden. Steinen und Pflanze…

Monatsnamen

(1,887 words)

Author(s): Freydank, Helmut (Potsdam) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Trümpy, Catherine (Basel)
I. Alter Orient [English version] A. Mesopotamien Seit Mitte des 3. Jt.v.Chr. lassen sich zahlreiche nach Region und Epoche unterschiedliche M.-Systeme feststellen. In der altbabylon. Zeit (20.-17. Jh.v.Chr.) setzte sich ein in ganz Babylonien verwendetes M.-System durch. Eigenständige lokale Systeme gab es im 19./18. Jh. zunächst noch u.a. im Diyālā-Gebiet und in Mari, bis zum Ende des 2. Jt.v.Chr. auch in Assyrien sowie zu verschiedenen Zeiten in den Randgebieten Mesopotamiens, wie in Ebla, Elam [2. …

Gilgamesch, Gilgamesch-Epos

(512 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] (Gilgameš, Gilgameš-Epos). G., sagenhafter Herrscher von Uruk in Südmesopotamien; in der Überl. mit dem Bau der um 2900 v.Chr. entstandenen, 9 km langen Stadtmauer von Uruk in Verbindung gebracht. Nichtlit. Quellen erwähnen G. bereits um 2700 v.Chr. Die Herrscher der aus Uruk stammenden 3. Dyn. von Ur (21. Jh. v.Chr.) behaupteten, mit G. genealogisch verbunden zu sein, und pflegten daher die von G. und seinen ebenfalls sagenhaften Vorgängern (Epos) überl. Geschichten zur Verherrl…

Mond

(1,283 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Hübner, Wolfgang (Münster)
[English version] I. Alter Orient M.-Lauf und M.-Phasen dienten bereits frühzeitig als wesentliche Strukturelemente des Kalenders in allen altorientalischen Kulturen. Außer mit den M.-Phasen hat man sich seit frühester Zeit ebenfalls mit den Eklipsen des M. als ominösen Zeichen auseinandergesetzt (Astrologie; Divination). Wie die Sonne war auch der als Gottheit vorgestellte M. Protagonist zahlreicher Mythen in Ägypten, Kleinasien [1. 373-375] und Mesopotamien (Mondgottheiten). In Babylonien war bereits gegen Ende des 3. Jt. die systematische Beobachtung de…

Pfandrecht

(1,042 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Schiemann, Gottfried (Tübingen)
[English version] I. Alter Orient Pfand(=Pf.)-Bestellung zur Vertragssicherung ist in den altorientalischen Rechten unterschiedlich gut bezeugt. Die Pf.-Bestellung spielt eine große Rolle im Verschuldungsprozeß in agrarischen Ges. Wenn z.B. Pächter mit ihren Abgabeverpflichtungen in Rückstand geraten waren, führte der Verfall eines Personen-Pf. oft zu Schuldknechtschaft [1; 2; 15. 179f.] mit den sich daraus ergebenden negativen Folgen für das soziale Gleichgewicht einer Ges. (Pacht I.). Pf.-Bestellung ist im Keilschriftrecht seit der 2. H. des 3. Jt. für di…

Ḫammurapi

(211 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] (Ḫammurabi). Bedeutendster Herrscher der 1. Dyn. von Babylon, regierte von 1792-1750 v.Chr. Nach langen Kämpfen mit rivalisierenden mesopot. Mächten, aber auch mit den Herrschern Elams, die Souveränität über die Staaten Mesopotamiens beanspruchten, hat Ḫ. seit 1755 v.Chr. ganz Mesopotamien von Mari am mittleren Euphrat und der Gegend um das h. Mossul bis an den pers. Golf beherrscht. Mehr als 200 von ihm stammende Briefe und zahlreiche Berichte der Abgesandten eines seiner Verbün…

Andriaka

(55 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] Κώμη Mediens (Ptol. 6,2,18), unweit eines Ortes Ῥάψα der an der Straße von Ekbatana nach Persepolis lag [1]. A. dürfte an der gleichen Strecke gelegen haben, mit Gulpaigan oder Kaidu identisch und wird über die Bedeutung eines Rastortes kaum hinausgekommen sein. Renger, Johannes (Berlin) Bibliography 1 Miller, 783 mit Skizze Nr. 253.

Manasse

(444 words)

Author(s): Liwak, Rüdiger (Berlin) | Kutsch, Ernst (Wien) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
(hebr. Menašše; griech. Μανασσῆ(ς)). [English version] [1] Israelitischer Stamm Israelitischer Stamm in Mittelpalästina und östl. des Jordan (Juda und Israel). Liwak, Rüdiger (Berlin) [English version] [2] König von Juda König von Juda. In seiner ungewöhnlich langen Regierungszeit (ca. 696-642 v.Chr.) war Juda nach den assyr. Eroberungen von 701 v.Chr. (Juda und Israel) auf Jerusalem mit Umland beschränkt, regenerierte sich aber zunehmend politisch und ökonomisch [2. 169-181]. M. (keilschriftlich Me-na-se-e/si-i bzw. Mi-in-se-e) war als loyaler Vasall der Assyrer…

Am(m)athus

(582 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Colpe, Carsten (Berlin) | Senff, Reinhard (Bochum)
(Ἀμ(μ)αθοῦς). [English version] [1] Festung östl. des Jordan Festung östl. des Jordan, tell 'ammatā, der das Nord-Ufer des wādi raǧib überragt und drei Straßen, darunter die dicht westl. vorbei nach Pella ( ṭabaqāt faḥil) führende, beherrscht (Eus. Onom. 22,24) [1; 2]. Der keramische Befund verrät bisher weder vorhell. Besiedlung noch zyprischen Import [3. 44; 4. 301]. Nach 98 v. Chr. von Alexandros Iannaios dem Tyrannen Theodoros von Philadelphia abgenommen und geschleift (Ios. bell. Iud. 1,4,2 f.; ant. Iud. 13,13,3; 5), 57 v.…

Kriegsgefangene

(1,511 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Burckhardt, Leonhard (Basel) | Le Bohec, Yann (Lyon)
[English version] I. Alter Orient K. sind sowohl in Äg. ( sqr-nḫ, “Gebundene zu Erschlagende” [3]) als auch in Mesopot. in der Frühzeit (4./3. Jt.) oft schon auf dem Schlachtfeld erschlagen worden. Das Töten - als ritualisierte Handlung - bzw. das Vorführen der K. und der Beute vor dem Herrscher hatte ideologischen Charakter und war daher Thema bildlicher Darstellung (Südmesopot. 3100 v.Chr.: Erschlagen gefesselter nackter K. in Gegenwart des Herrschers [5. 9]; 24. Jh.: nackte männl. K. - wohl unmittelbar…

Kochbücher

(732 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Schmitt-Pantel, Pauline (Paris)
[English version] I. Alter Orient und Ägypten Obwohl es zahlreiche inschr. und bildliche Zeugnisse für eine hochentwickelte Eßkultur an den Höfen altoriental. Herrscher gibt, sind Kochrezepte bisher nur aus Mesopot. bekannt: 34 aus dem 18. Jh.v.Chr. (gesammelt auf 3 Tontafeln), eins aus dem 6./5. Jh. Es handelt sich dabei um praktische Handlungsanleitungen im Stil von medizinischen Rezepturen. Der Zweck, für den die Rezepte schriftl. festgehalten wurden, ist unklar. Sie betreffen überwiegend in Brühe gekochtes Geflügel und anderes Fleisch, daneben z…

Papyrus

(1,815 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris) | Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
I. Material [English version] A. Begriff und Herstellung Das Wort P. wurde über das griech. πάπυρος ( pápyros), lat. papyrus, in die europäischen Sprachen übernommen, letztlich stammt daher das mod. Wort für Papier, paper, papier usw. Man leitet P. hypothetisch von einem (nicht belegten) äg. * pa-prro (“das des Königs”) ab. P., eine Wasserpflanze mit langem Stengel und dreieckigem Querschnitt (cyperus papyrus L.), war in verarbeiteter Form ein in den alten Kulturen des Mittelmeerraums verbreiteter Beschreibstoff (“Papier”). Zur Herstellung …

Lauch

(533 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[English version] I. Mesopotamien, Ägypten, Kleinasien Die zahlreichen, botan. nicht in jedem Fall eindeutig identifizierbaren sumer. und akkad. Ausdrücke für Alliaceae beziehen sich z.T. lediglich auf Subspecies von L., Schalotte, Zwiebel (Z.) oder Knoblauch (K.) [1. 301]. L. ist in seinen versch. Formen - sumer. *karaš, akkad. kar( a) šu, hebr. kārēš, aram. karrāttā, arab. kurrāṯu - ein oriental. Kulturwort. K. heißt sumer. sum, akkad. šūmū, sonst in semit. Sprachen ṯūm, die Zwiebel akkad. šamaškillū, aram. šmšgl (so auch als Logogramm in Pahlevi); die äg. Bezeichnungen ḫdw (Z…

Preis

(3,508 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | von Reden, Sitta (Bristol) | Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[English version] I. Alter Orient Preise oder Äquivalente für zahlreiche vertretbare Sachen hatten sowohl in Äg. als auch in Mesopotamien einen allgemein anerkannten Wert, über dessen Zustandekommen aber nichts bekannt ist. P. wurden in Äg. zunächst meist in einer Werteinheit šn( tj) (vielleicht “Silberring”?), im NR auch in Kupfer und Sack Getreide (die beide aber nicht als Austauschmedium dienten) [7. 13], in Mesopot. meist in gewogenem Silber (zuweilen in Assyrien auch in Zinn) ausgedrückt. Angaben über Äquivalente sind in unterschiedlicher Dichte und Aussagekraf…

Neujahrsfest

(1,809 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Ahn, Gregor (Heidelberg) | Graf, Fritz (Princeton)
In den einzelnen lokalen bzw. überregionalen Kalendern wurde der Jahresanfang unterschiedlich festgelegt. Er richtete sich, soweit erkennbar, an den jahreszeitlich gebundenen landwirtschaftlichen Gegebenheiten (bes. Aussaat im Frühjahr und Ernte im Herbst) aus. Der Jahresanfang war mit verwaltungstechnisch relevanten Maßnahmen (z.B. Abgabenerhebung) verbunden. Ihrer Bed. innerhalb des agrarischen Zyklus entsprechend fanden Frühjahr und Herbst im Festkalender bes. Berücksichtigung. Da Frühjahrs- …

Kümmel

(252 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg)
[English version] I. Alter Orient K. war als Gewürzpflanze in Mesopot., Äg., Äthiopien und Kleinasien verbreitet und wird in myk. Linear B-Texten als ku-mi-no erwähnt [6. 131, 136, 227]. Das Wort ist ein bis ins 3. Jt. zurückzuverfolgendes Kulturwort (sumer. * kamun; akkad. kamūnum, hethit. kappani- [mit m > p-Wechsel], ugarit. kmn, hebr. kammōn, türk. çemen, engl./franz. cumin). Äg. K. (Cuminum cyminum; äg. tpnn, kopt. tapen) scheint möglicherweise eine andere Spezies des K. gewesen zu sein [5]. K. wurde in Äg. auch medizinisch (u.a. bei Magen-Darm-Beschwe…

Labaka

(31 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Fischer, Klaus (Bonn)
[English version] (Λάβακα). Nach Ptol. 7,1,46 Stadt in NW-Indien, im Land der Pandooi (wohl altindisch Pāṇḍava). Renger, Johannes (Berlin) Fischer, Klaus (Bonn) Bibliography O. Wecker, s.v. L., RE 12, 239.

Altorientalische Philologie und Geschichte

(4,632 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) RWG
Renger, Johannes (Berlin) RWG [English version] A. Name und Definition (RWG) Die APG ist Teil der Altorientalistik (Ancient Near Eastern Studies), die neben Philol. und Geschichte auch die Arch. des Alten Orients (AO) einschließt. Der Begriff “altoriental.” bezieht sich im Kontext westeurop. und amerikanischer Wiss. auf den geogr. Raum Vorderasien und dessen vorchristl. bzw. vorislamische Kulturen auf den Gebieten der heutigen Türkei, Syriens, Libanons, Israels, Jordaniens, des Irak, der arab. Halbinsel un…

Qadesch

(247 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] Dieser Ort ist auf folgenden Karten verzeichnet: Ägäische Koine | Ḫattusa ( Qadeš, Kadeš). Ort in Mittelsyrien, südl. von Ḥimṣ, h. Tall Nabī Mand, strategisch wichtig gelegen an der Schnittstelle zw. der äg. und mittanischen bzw. hethitischen Einflußsphäre. Im 15. Jh. versuchte Thutmosis III., den Ort zu erobern [2. 94-98]. Bedeutsam als Ort einer Schlacht zw. dem hethit. Herrscher Muwattalli II. (1290-1272 v. Chr.) und Ramses II. im Jahr 1275 v. Chr. Anlaß war der Abfall Amurrus von Ḫattusa …

Ptolemaïs

(1,197 words)

Author(s): Ameling, Walter (Jena) | Harmon, Roger (Basel) | Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Huß, Werner (Bamberg) | Et al.
(Πτολεμαίς). [English version] [1] Tochter Ptolemaios' [1] I. und der Eurydike [4] Tochter Ptolemaios' [1] I. und der Eurydike [4]; verm. mit einem Nachkommen des Pharao Nektanebos [2] verheiratet; seit 298 v. Chr. verlobt, ab 287 Gattin des Demetrios [2] Poliorketes. PP VI 14565. Ameling, Walter (Jena) Bibliography W. Huß, Das Haus des Nektanebis und das Haus des Ptolemaios, in: AncSoc 25, 1994, 111-117  J. Seibert, Histor. Beitr. zu den dynastischen Verbindungen in hell. Zeit, 1967, 30 ff. 74 f. [English version] [2] P. aus Kyrene Musikgelehrte, 1. Jh. Die einzige bekannte weiblic…

Iobaritai

(31 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] (Ἰωβαρῖται, Ἰοβαρῖται). Ethn. Gruppe im südl. Arabien; nur bei Ptol. 6,7,24 als Nachbarn der Sachalitai (Sachalites) erwähnt. Renger, Johannes (Berlin) Bibliography J. Tkač, s.v. I., RE 9, 1832-1837.

Frau

(4,768 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Feucht, Erika (Heidelberg) | Brosius, Maria (Oxford) | Macuch, Maria (Berlin) | Wagner-Hasel, Beate (Darmstadt) | Et al.
I. Alter Orient, Ägypten und Iran [English version] A. Einführung Die Kenntnis über den Status von F. beruht weitgehend auf Texten juristischer Natur (Rechtsurkunden, Rechtsbücher, königliche Erlasse). Dementsprechend betont die bisherige Forschung v.a. die rechtlichen Aspekte der Stellung von F. in Familie und Gesellschaft. Nichtjuristiche Texte unterschiedlicher Genres enthalten Nachrichten über das Wirken von F. aus den Familien der Eliten, insbes. denen der königlichen Clans. So nimmt die hethit. Köni…

Bilingue

(1,693 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Neumann, Günter (Würzburg)
[English version] A. Definition B. (oder Bilinguis) heißen Inschr., die den gleichen Text in zwei Sprachen bieten, um für unterschiedliche Adressaten verständlich zu sein. Dabei unterscheidet man B., die Texte mit genauer Entsprechung bieten, von solchen, bei denen der eine Text nur knapper informiert. - “Quasi-B.” unterscheiden sich zwar in ihrer Textgestalt, handeln aber vom selben Thema oder denselben Personen. B. sind nur solche Texte, die zeitgleich aus gleichem Anlaß und zum gleichen Zweck ve…

Kaspioi

(38 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] Indischer Bergstamm am Hindukusch; die Vorfahren der Kāfir (d.h. “Ungläubigen”) in den Tälern des Kūnar, des Flusses von Tschitral. Im Verzeichnis der pers. Steuerbezirke bei Hdt. 3,93 mit den Saken zusammengefaßt. Renger, Johannes (Berlin)

Lagaš

(66 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[English version] Stadt und Territorialstaat (Hauptstadt Girsu) im südl. Mesopot. mit bedeutenden inschr., architektonischen und bildnerischen Funden aus dem 25.-21. Jh. v.Chr., die für die Rekonstruktion der frühen mesopot. Gesch. und Kultur sowie für die Erarbeitung einer sumer. Gramm. eine wichtige Rolle gespielt haben (Altorientalistik). Renger, Johannes (Berlin) Bibliography J.Bauer, D.P. Hanson, s.v. L., RLA 6, 419-431  A. Falkenstein, Die Inschr. Gudeas von L. Einleitung, 1966.

Alexandreia

(1,526 words)

Author(s): Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) | Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Treidler, Hans (Berlin) | Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin) | Et al.
(Ἀλεξάνδρεια). Name zahlreicher Stadtgründungen Alexanders d. Gr.; darunter neun im östl. Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan und Indien. [English version] [1] in Ägypten Dieser Ort ist auf folgenden Karten verzeichnet: Ägypten | Ägypten | Alexandros | Athleten | Bildung | Caesar | Christentum | Diadochen und Epigonen | Handel | Hellenistische Staatenwelt | Hellenistische Staatenwelt | Indienhandel | Legio | Legio | Limes | Pilgerschaft | Pompeius | Roma | Roma | Wein | Zenobia | Straßen Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) [English version] A. Topographie Stadt an der ägypt. Mittelmeerküst…

Kult, Kultus

(3,296 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Princeton) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Backhaus, Knut (Paderborn)
[English version] I. Allgemein Kult(us) umfaßt die Gesamtheit der rituellen Trad. im Kontext der rel. Praxis. Der Terminus leitet sich über die christl. Verwendung vom bereits ciceronischen cultus deorum (“Verehrung der Götter”) her und entspricht griech. thrēskeía; wie dieser (und lat. caerimonia, “Riten”) kann er in der paganen Sprache für “Rel.” überhaupt stehen und damit auf die absolute Prädominanz der rituellen Akte gegenüber den Glaubensinhalten in der paganen griech. und röm. Rel. verweisen. Dabei steht hier wie in den rel. Kul…

Pornographie

(2,901 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | von Lieven, Alexandra (Berlin) | Henderson, Jeffrey (Boston) | Obermayer, Hans-Peter (München)
[English version] I. Alter Orient P. ist aus dem Alten Orient nicht überl., es sei denn, man betrachtet zahlreiche Darstellungen des Geschlechtsaktes auf Terrakottareliefs und Bleiplaketten - von denen möglicherweise viele als magische Amulette dienten oder ex-voto-Gaben darstellten [1. 265] - als P. Explizite verbale, auf Sexuelles Bezug nehmende Schilderungen stammen aus lit. Texten (z. T. Hymnen auf Ištar, die u. a. als Göttin der geschlechtlichen Liebe galt) und sind so eher ein Zeugnis für eine unvoreingenommene Einstellung z…

Palast

(3,499 words)

Author(s): Nielsen, Inge (Hamburg) | Nissen, Hans Jörg (Berlin) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin)
[English version] I. Terminologie und Definition Der mod. Begriff “Palast” leitet sich ab vom Palatin (Mons Palatinus), dem Hügel Roms, auf dem die Residenzen der röm. Kaiser standen. Als P. werden Bauanlagen bezeichnet, die einem Herrscher als Wohn- und Repräsentationssitz dienten. Je nach weiteren, dazukommenden Funktionen konnte er im Alt. verschiedene, von der jeweiligen Funktion abhängige Bezeichnungen haben. Nielsen, Inge (Hamburg) II. Alter Orient [English version] A. Baugeschichte Im Alten Orient und Äg. war ein P. von den Ursprüngen her ein Wohnhaus mit…

Ancient Near Eastern philology and history (Assyriology)

(5,513 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
Renger, Johannes (Berlin) [German version] A. Name and definition (CT) Ancient Near Eastern Philology and History (ANEPH) is part of Ancient Near Eastern Studies, which includes the archaeology of the ancient Near East as well as philology and history. The term ‘ancient Near Eastern’, in the context of Western European and American scholarship, refers to the geographical area of the Near East and its pre-Christian or pre-Islamic civilizations in the territory of present-day Turkey, Syria, Lebanon, Israel,…

Ishtar

(181 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] The Semitic goddess I. is etymologically related to  Astarte ( Aṯtarat). Grammatically speaking, the name is masculine (cf. Western Semitic Aṯtar). In southern Mesopotamia she was identified with Innana, the Sumerian city-goddess of  Uruk, and there is evidence of her being worshipped in that city into Achaemenid times. In northern Babylonia and Assyria figures of I. were venerated in numerous cities (I. of the cities  Akkad,  Arbela [1],  Nineveh) and to an extent identified with other goddesses. Th…

Libation

(773 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient and Egypt Since sacrifices were primarily intended to ensure that the daily needs of the gods were met, not only victuals but also beverages (generally water, beer, wine) were an essential component of regular sacrifices to the gods, as well as of sacrifices offered to the dead. Both in Egypt and in Mesopotamia, libation and terms used for libation stand as pars pro toto for sacrifice. This may have stemmed originally from the fact that for people living at a subsistence level the libation of water constituted their only opport…

Genealogy

(962 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt)
In early societies, largely based on family organizations, genealogy as a derivation of a person's descent in the form of a pedigree is often used as a means of legitimation and (pseudo-historical) memory, which was always also directed at publicity (genealogy from Greek γενεαλογεῖν; genealogeîn, ‘to talk about [one's] origin’). [German version] I. Near East and Egypt The purpose of lineage, transmitted in the form of a genealogy (generally patrilineal; exceptions in the case of Egyptian rulers), was to legitimate a claim to rulership, to tenure of a …

Thinis

(97 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] (Greek Θίνις/ Thínis, Θίς/ Thís; Coptic tin). Capital of the eighth nome of Upper Egypt, precise location unknown. T. was an ancient royal metropolis of the First and Second Dynasties (3000-2635 BC). According to Manetho [1], who calls the rulers (e.g. Menes [1]) of the First Dynasty  Θεινίτης, -αι/ Theinítēs, -ai, 'Thinites', this period is also known as the Thinite period. The necropol(e)is of T…

Inn

(1,837 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Dräger, Michael
[German version] I. Ancient Orient So far, evidence of inns comes mainly from Mesopotamia. There the inn was usually also the place where - outside institutional households -  beer was brewed. Inns normally served beer, with only one mention of the operator of a  wine tavern (ancient Babylonian period, 17th cent. BC; [3]). The running of an inn by a landlord or landlady or a hot-food stall by a cook was registered and licensed by royal edict in the ancient Babylonian period [5. 85]. Both had to pay a…

Papyrus

(2,017 words)

Author(s): Dorandi, Tiziano (Paris) | Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg)
I. Material [German version] A. Term and manufacture The term papyrus was adopted into the European languages via the Greek πάπυρος/ pápyros, lat. papyrus, and ultimately is the source of the modern terms for paper, Papier, papier, etc.  Papyrus is hypothetically derived from an (unattested) Egyptian * pa-prro ('that of the king'). Papyrus, an aquatic plant with a long stem and a triangular cross-section (

Antioch

(1,581 words)

Author(s): Wittke, Anne-Maria (Tübingen) | Leisten, Thomas (Princeton) | Wagner, Jörg (Tübingen) | Tomaschitz, Kurt (Vienna) | Weiß, Peter (Kiel) | Et al.
(Ἀντιόχεια; Antiócheia). [German version] [1] on the Orontes Founded as Antigonea on the Orontes 307 BC, but after the defeat of Antigonus I by Seleucus I Nicator at  Ipsus (301 BC), the town was moved to the site of present-day Antakya (Turkey) in 300 BC, and renamed as A. in honour of the latter's father Antiochus. Capital city of the Seleucid kingdom; it developed under the Seleucids through incorporating numerous settlements into a tetrapolis, each with their own boundary walls. Thanks to its positi…

Sumerians

(167 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] Akkadian term (of unclear etymology) [2. 33 f.] for the predominant ethnicity of southern Mesopotamia (Babylonia) towards the end of the 4th and in the 3rd millennium BC, defined by their Sumerian writing culture (Sumerian). By the early 3rd millennium, Semitic-speaking ethnicities (called Akkadians in scholarly literature; Akkadian) also played a role in Mesopot…

Cult

(3,745 words)

Author(s): Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Backhaus, Knut (Paderborn)
[German version] I. General Cult encompasses the entirety of ritual tradition in the context of religious practise. Via Christian usage, the term derives from the cultus deorum (‘divine worship’) named already in Cicero, and corresponds to the Greek thrēskeía; like the latter (and the Latin caerimonia, ‘rites’), it can in pagan language stand simply for ‘religion’ in general and thus refer to the absolute predominance in pagan Greek and Roman religion of ritual actions over faith. There, as in the religious cultures of the ancient Mediterr…

Measures

(1,991 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Sallaberger, Walther (Leipzig) | Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) | Schulzki, Heinz-Joachim (Mannheim)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient Although the different basic measurement systems (length, measures of volume and weights) were created and defined independently of each other, at least in Mesopotamia relationships between them were established. In the Ancient Orient as elsewhere, the terms for measures of length were based on body parts (cubit, palm and finger widths), however, the foot was not used as a basic measure of length. Regional and temporal differences must be considered. The Babylonian ‘cubit’ (Sumerian kùš, Akkadian ammatu, normally c. 50 cm; in the 1st millenni…

Assemblies

(2,182 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Eder, Walter (Berlin)
[German version] I. Ancient Near East There was at various periods and in various regions of the ancient Near East a spectrum of manifestations of collective bodies with diverse powers of decision-making  and capacities for implementation. Crucial to the role of such collective bodies was on the one hand the nature of their historical genesis, and on the other hand the nature of their integration into the prevailing system of rulership. There were no popular assemblies as in the Classical Mediterranea…

Purity

(1,297 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Podella, Thomas (Lübeck)
[German version] I. Mesopotamia In Sumerian the adjective kug and in Akkadian the corresponding adjective ellu express the principle of (cultic) purity. Both words also contain the nuance of 'bright', 'shining'. Sumerian kug and Akkadian ellu (when in textual dependence upon kug) mark characteristics of deities, localities (e.g., temples), (cult) objects, rites and periods of time as belonging to the sphere of the divine. This, however, does not necessarily mean that they must be in an uncontaminated state. In this respect kug is most often rendered as 'holy/sacred'. Akkadian ellu, …

Woman

(7,947 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Feucht, Erika (Heidelberg) | Brosius, Maria (Oxford) | Macuch, Maria (Berlin) | RU.PA. | Et al.
I. Ancient Orient, Egypt and Iran [German version] A. Introduction Knowledge of the status of women is largely based on texts of a legal nature (legal documents, law books, royal decrees). Accordingly, research to date emphasizes primarily the legal aspects of the position of women in family and society. Non-legal texts from a variety of genres contain information on the activities of women from the families of the elite, particularly those of the royal clan. Thus, the Hittite royal wife Puduḫepa (13th ce…

Sun god

(930 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | von Lieven, Alexandra (Berlin) | Taracha, Piotr
[German version] I. Mesopotamia In Mesopotamia, the Sumerian sun god Utu (written with the Sumerian sign for day, ud, which may be an etymological connection) was regarded as the city god of South Babylonian Larsa [2. 287-291] and the Akkadian god Šamaš (also common Semitic for 'sun') as the city god of North Babylonian Sippar. The sun god was never at the top of the Mesopotamian pantheon [1] which was dominated by Enlil (3rd/early 2nd millennium), Marduk (1st millennium) and Assur [2]. As the god of daylight, Ša…

Alexandria

(1,725 words)

Author(s): Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) | Schwertheim, Elmar (Münster) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Treidler, Hans (Berlin) | Brentjes, Burchard (Berlin) | Et al.
(Ἀλεξάνδρεια; Alexándreia). Name of numerous cities founded by Alexander the Great, including nine in eastern Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan and India. [German version] [1] in Egypt This item can be found on the following maps: Egypt | Caesar | Christianity | Wine | Zenobia | | Diadochi and Epigoni | Alexander | Commerce | Hellenistic states | Hellenistic states | India, trade with | Legio | Legio | Limes | Pilgrimage | Pompeius | Rome | Rome | Athletes | Education / Culture | Egypt Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) [German version] A. Topography City on the Egyptian Mediterranean coast foun…

Dreams; Interpretation of dreams

(2,165 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Walde, Christine (Basle)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient Dreams and their interpretation were a popular topic in the written tradition of the Ancient Orient and Egypt since the 22nd cent. BC. Both spontaneously experienced dreams as well as dream incubation are attested. Preserved dreams relate divine messages (in the form of theophanies). Though usually contained in literary texts [3; 5. 746; 6], they also occur in letters [1]. Dreams also contained ethical maxims and wisdom for life reflecting personal experience and st…

Bilingual inscriptions

(1,899 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Neumann, Hans (Berlin)
[German version] A. Definition Bilingual inscriptions (or ‘bilingues’) are inscriptions that present the same text in two languages so as to be comprehensible to different readerships. Thus, bilingual inscriptions (BI), with closely corresponding texts, are distinguished from others in which one of the texts only summarizes the other. -- ‘Quasi-BI’ do indeed differ in their text format but treat the same subject matter or the same personalities. BI are only such texts as are composed contemporaneou…

Sacrifice

(10,943 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Haas, Volkert (Berlin) | Podella, Thomas (Lübeck) | Et al.
I. Religious studies [German version] A. General Sacrifice is one of the central concepts in describing ritual religion in ancient and modern cultures. In European Modernity, the term sacrifice (directly or indirectly influenced by Christian theology of the sacrificial death of Jesus Christ to redeem mankind) also has an intimation towards individual self-giving ('sacrifice of self'). The range of nuances in the modern meaning stretches to include discourses that have lost their religious motif and hav…

Iobaritae

(33 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin)
[German version] (Ἰωβαρῖται; Iōbarîtai, Ἰοβαρῖται; Iobarîtai). Ethnic group in southern Arabia; only mentioned in Ptol. 6,7,24 as neighbours of the Sachalitae ( Sachalites). Renger, Johannes (Berlin) Bibliography J. Tkač, s.v. I., RE 9, 1832-1837.

Wine

(4,434 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Ruffing, Kai (Münster) | Gutsfeld, Andreas (Münster)
(οἶνος/ oînos; Lat. vinum). [German version] I.Egypt and Ancient Near East Archeological finds (excavations, pictorial representations in tombs) as well as Egyptian and Roman texts contain a plethora of information about the growing, production and use of wine in Egypt from the Early Period to the Ptolemaic-Roman Period. Wine (Egyptian jrp; Coptic ērp; Old-Nubian orpj/ē; cf. in Sappho 51 ἔρπις/ érpis [9. 46], probably an old foreign cult word [7. 1169]) was grown primarily in Lower Egypt or the Nile Delta and in the oases, clearly because of the favourab…

Economy

(7,079 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Alonso-Núñez, José Miguel (Madrid) | W.BR.
[German version] I. Mesopotamia Mesopotamia's economy was based on  agriculture, with animal  husbandry integrated into it. Craft production ( Crafts) was only supplementary in character and catered for internal demand as well as external trade (production of high-quality textiles for  Commerce). Agriculture in southern Mesopotamia (Babylonia) was entirely dependent on artificial  irrigation; in northern Mesopotamia (Assyria) it was generally rainfed. Varying agricultural regimes led to different patterns of land tenure. Large production units are attes…

Months, names of the

(2,315 words)

Author(s): Freydank, Helmut (Potsdam) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Trümpy, Catherine (Basle)
I. Ancient Orient [German version] A. Mesopotamia From the middle of the 3rd millennium BC onwards, numerous systems for the names of the months that varied according to region and era are attested. In the Old Babylonian Period (20th-17th cents. BC), a system used throughout Babylonia gained acceptance. In the 19th/18th cents., there were initially autonomous local systems, among other places in the Diyālā area and in Mari, and up to the end of the 2nd millennium BC also in Assyria as well as during va…
▲   Back to top   ▲