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Sigla

(182 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] Sigla, earlier notae, is the Latin name for abbreviations. Since the time of the Greeks, S. for names, titles, places etc. have been found on coins, conditioned by the small space available. In Greek inscriptions, on the other hand, S. are, at least in pre-Roman times,  extraordinarily rare. This is in stark  contrast to their extensive use amongst the Etruscans and above all the Romans, where some types of information - such as first names, tribus, former offices and set phrases fo…

Funerary inscriptions

(433 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] Funerary inscriptions (FI) (now probably approaching a number of 200,000, cf. [3. 124,1]) emerged in the context of the cult of the dead with the purpose of marking the grave of a specific person so that sacrifices for the dead could be performed at the correct place. Furthermore, they soon took on the function of keeping alive the memory of this person and his achievements. They are located above ground at the burial site, or, in communal graves, on the urn holding the ashes, on the sarcophagus, or on the lid of the loculus (the burial niche). In addition to the inscrip…

Municipium

(1,885 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] A. Etymologie and Definition It is possible that the Latin term municipes predates that of municipium. In the view of historians such as Varro (Ling. 5,179), the former is derived from munia (or respectively munera) capere, ‘the undertaking of duties’; the explanation ‘the receiving of gifts’ in [7. 26] has to be rejected in the same way as the ancient interpretation by Gellius (16,13,7) that municipium was to be seen as munus honorarium (‘honorary privilege’). Varro referred to obligations by Roman citizens such as military service and payment of taxes which the munici…

Pagus

(449 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] (Pl. pagi, etymologically related to pangere and pax; 'region with fixed borders'). The Latin pagus refers to the non-urbanized 'district', whose population lived in individual farms and villages ( vici; see vicus ), possibly with one or more oppida ( oppidum ) serving as a refuge; the pagus was the customary form of settlement for many Italian tribes, esp. the Oscan population of the mountainous regions of Central Italy [4] and among the Celts of Upper Italy [2]. The Romans used pagus as the designation for the subdivision of an urban territory. The pagi in the Roman Con…

Tabula Banasitana

(124 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] Bronze inscription from Banasa (in Mauretania Tingitana) with copies ( exempla) of three documents and a list of 12 witnesses, probably members of the imperial consilium. It deals with a conferment of citizenship under Marcus Aurelius on 6 July AD 177: at his own request, Iulianus, a princeps of the Zegrensi tribe, and his family are granted Roman citizenship for extraordinary service ( maxima merita), without prejudice to his tribal rights ( salvo iure gentis). The TB is important evidence of the conditions for conferring citizenship at the end of the …

Coloniae

(1,410 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] A. Definition A colonia was a settlement of citizens (with the addition of a greater or lesser proportion of non-citizens) for the military and political securing of Roman rule, later for providing for veterans and occasionally the Roman proletariat, almost always in a conquered city, the citizens of which would also be involved in the colony in some way (cf. the definition in Serv. Aen. 1,12). Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn) [German version] B. Founding and constitution Coloniae are founded on the basis of the people's law by public officials, mainly IIIviri coloniae deduc…

Vici magistri

(456 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
(Singular vici magister). Elected leaders of vici (Vicus) in the city of Rome and in Italian cities. [German version] I. Rome VM are recorded as early as the Republic; their identification with the magistri collegiorum mentioned in Asconius (p. 6 Clark) cannot be doubted ( pace [2]). Their duties were the cult of the Lares Compitales (Lares [1] C) and organizing the Compitalia on 1 January. In the late Republic they were involved in the political activities of the collegia [1] and for a number of years were banned, until Clodius [I 4] permitted them again. They presumably…

Lapis niger

(186 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] Block of black marble found at Rome in 1899 during excavations in the Forum Romanum in front of the Curia Iulia. It is probably the niger lapis in comitio from Fest. 184 L. The upper section of the stone is damaged; on five sides it bears a fragmentary inscription, difficult to read and dating from the (early?) 6th cent. BC (probably the lex sacra of the Volcanal, the surrounding sacred precinct), which mentions a ‘king’ ( recei), his ‘herald’ ( calator) and iouxmenta (draught animals? carts?). This may be the inscription which Dionysius of Halicarnassus (Ant. …

Pomerium

(595 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] The pomerium was the line, important in religious law, which at Rome and its colonies ( coloniae ) divided the urbs from the ager, i.e. the city in the strictest sense from its surrounding territories. Even in antiquity, the meaning of the word was obscure. According to point of view, it was etymologically explained as the line 'behind' ( post or pone murum) or 'in front of' ( promoerium) the city wall (Varro Ling. 5,143 and Gell. NA 13,14,1 versus Fest. 295), but neither etymology is likely to be tenable The establishment of the pomerium constituted the climax of a city f…

Foedus Gabinum

(148 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] Alleged treaty from the time of king Tarquinius Superbus (end 6th cent. BC), which was still extant in the Augustan period on a shield covered in cowhide in the temple of Semo Sancus; documented in Dion. Hal. Ant. Rom. 4,58,4 and on coins of two Antistii (family from Gabii, C.  Antistius [II 7] Vetus and C. Antistius Reginus) from the Augustan period: FOEDUS P.R. CUM GABINIS (RIC2 1, 68 no. 363 and 73 no. 411). Main content was an isopoliteia between Rome and Gabii. According to Varro (Ling. 5,33) the ager Gabinus represented an exceptional feature of augural law between the age…

Foedus

(391 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] Ceremonial treaty of peace and friendship between Rome and another state which is placed under the protection of the gods. By contrast to a truce ( indutiae) the foedus was drawn up for the long term ( pia et aeterna pax). The result of the foedus was a   societas or an   amicitia , Rome's partners were   foederati ,   socii or amici (the terms are not strictly differentiated). Originally the foedera were probably signed by the   fetiales in the form of a sponsio (Liv. 1,24); later their role was confined to supervising the religious formalities. The foedus was usually signed by…

Vicesima

(488 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] (derived from Lat. viginti, 'twenty'; literally, 'the twentieth part'). In Rome, V. was the term referring to five-per-cent taxes [IV]; esp. important were the V . manumissionum or libertatis (manumission tax) and the V. hereditatium (inheritance tax). According to the annalistic tradition (Liv. 7,16,7; on this [3]), the V. manumissionum or libertatis was already decided upon in 357 BC by the Roman army through a vote according to tribus near Sutrium and was afterwards approved by the Senate. Probably from the beginning, it was…

Latin League

(159 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] A federation of towns ( populi) in Latium Vetus that was organized around the sanctuary of Jupiter Latiaris on mons Albanus , but in part also around that of Diana of Aricia. The rights of members were regulated in the foedus Cassianum . The federation came increasingly under Roman control, first during the time of the Tarquinian kings and then in the 4th cent. BC. In 338 the majority of its members was annexed and the remainder became the prisci Latini. Latini, Latium (with map) Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn) Bibliography T. J. Cornell, The Beginnings of Rome, 1995, 293ff. H. Gals…

Res publica

(1,027 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[German version] (literally: 'public matter', in contrast to res privata, 'private matter') is the sum of the possessions, rights and interests of the Roman state, where the term 'state' is understood not as an abstract concept separable from its citizenry, but as the concrete manifestation of the generality of its citizens: res publica est res populi (Cic. Rep. 1,25,39; ' res publica is the affair of the people'; Populus). Accordingly, res publica is not identifiable with the modern concepts of 'state' or 'constitution'; in its original meaning it denotes differen…

Foedus

(348 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[English version] Feierlicher Friedens- und Freundschaftsvertrag zwischen Rom und einem anderen Staat, der unter den Schutz der Götter gestellt ist. Im Gegensatz zum Waffenstillstand ( indutiae) ist das f. auf Dauer angelegt ( pia et aeterna pax). Ergebnis des f. ist eine societas oder amicitia , die Partner Roms sind foederati , socii oder amici (die Termini sind nicht streng getrennt). Geschlossen wurden die foedera ursprünglich wohl von den fetiales in Form einer sponsio (Liv. 1,24), später ist deren Rolle auf die Überwachung der rel. Formen beschränkt. Das f. schließt nun meist…

Aesculetum

(49 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[English version] Hain von Eichen ( aesculus) in Rom, aus deren Zweigen die coronae civicae gebunden wurden. Er lag im westl. Marsfeld, auf der Höhe der Tiberinsel, beim Lungotevere Cenci. Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn) Bibliography S. Panciera, Ancora tra epigrafia e topografia, in: L'Urbs. Espace Urbain et Histoire, 1987, 62-73.

Lex Ursonensis

(181 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[English version] Flavische Kopie des Stadtgesetzes der caesarischen colonia Iulia Genetiva in Urso, von der vier fast komplette Taf. 1870/71 und weitere 12 Frg. 1925 in und bei Osuna (Prov. Sevilla) in Südspanien gefunden wurden (h. im Arch. Nationalmuseum Madrid). Urspr. umfaßte das Gesetz wohl neun Taf. mit je drei bzw. fünf Textkolumnen und knapp über 140 Abschnitten ( rubricae), von denen 61-82, 91-106 und 123-134 fast ganz, einige weitere in Frg. erh. sind. Das Koloniegesetz wurde (vielleicht nach Caesars Tod von M. Antonius, vgl. §104) als Einzelgesetz vor die …

Municipium

(1,589 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[English version] A. Etymologie und Definition Älter als lat. m. ist wohl der Begriff municipes. Nach Meinung ant. Historiker wie Varro (ling. 5,179) leitete er sich ab von munia (bzw. munera) capere, “Pflichten übernehmen”; die Erklärung “Geschenke empfangen” bei [7. 26] ist ebenso abzulehnen wie die ant. Deutung bei Gellius (16,13,7), m. sei als munus honorarium (“Ehrenvorrecht”) zu verstehen. Gemeint sind bei Varro vielmehr die Pflichten der röm. Bürger wie Militärdienst und Steuerzahlung, die die municipes übernahmen, ohne im eigentlichen Sinn röm. Bürger zu sein …

Coloniae

(1,213 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[English version] A. Definition Eine colonia war eine Ansiedlung von Bürgern (mit einer mehr oder weniger großen Beimischung von Nichtbürgern) zur mil. und polit. Festigung der röm. Herrschaft, später zur Versorgung von Veteranen und gelegentlich stadtröm. Proletariat, fast immer in einer eroberten Stadt, deren Bürger in irgendeiner Form an der Kolonie beteiligt werden (vgl. die Definition bei Serv. Aen. 1,12). Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn) [English version] B. Gründung und Verfassung C. werden aufgrund von Volksgesetz durch Beamte, meist IIIviri c. deducendae, ab Marius mehr …

Lex Irnitana

(392 words)

Author(s): Galsterer, Hartmut (Bonn)
[English version] Einziges zu großen Teilen erh. lat. Stadtgesetz, für ein latin. municipium aus der Zeit Domitians (E. 1. Jh.n.Chr.); gefunden bei illegalen Grabungen 1981 in El Saucejo im S der h. Prov. Sevilla in Südspanien und von den Behörden für das Arch. Nationalmuseum Sevilla aufgekauft (Erstveröffentlichung: [2], mit engl. Übers.; maßgeblicher Text: [4]). Von den urspr. zehn Br.-Tafeln (H 58 cm, B 91 cm) sind sechs (III, V, VII-X), wenn auch teilweise in Trümmern, fast vollständig erh. Zusammen mit einigen Fragmenten der verlorenen Tafeln und dem Paralleltext in der lex Mal…
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