Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Schneider, Konrad" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Schneider, Konrad" )' returned 33 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Bimetallism

(713 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
Bimetallism (double currency) denotes a monetary system (Currency) in which two coin metals circulate as legal tender, with a fixed official rate of exchange between them. In monometallic currencies (Monometallism), establishing the exchange rate was relatively simple: one metal (Gold or Silver) was the currency metal, and Coin of the other metal were valued on the basis of the currency metal in accordance with the gold-silver ratio at the time, which depended on metal prices. In the Holy Roman …
Date: 2019-10-14

Kipper und Wipper

(1,175 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
1. DefinitionThe term  Kipper und Wipper was first used for a monetary crisis from 1619 to 1623 centered in the Old Empire. It came from  Geldkippe, a convenient and common assay balance (Scales) used to identify undebased coins in circulation. They would then be ausgekippt (from Low German  kippen, “to lop”) or  gewippt (“teetered”) from the balance, melted down, and reminted as debased coins. This practice was illegal, but the unequal weights of circulating coins made it common well into the 19th century, part of the speculation engaged …
Date: 2019-10-14

Guilder (gold)

(950 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
Like the ducat, the guilder originated in 13th-century Italy. It was derived from the coin minted by the city of Florence, also called a florin (Ital. fiorino), on which the lily, the emblem of the city, was depicted, along with John the Baptist. Initially it consisted of fine gold and weighed about 3.54 grams. The florin spread rapidly and after 1325 was also minted in Hungary and after the mid-14th century in the Holy Roman Empire as well. After the Rhenish Coinage Union was established (1385/1386) by the electors of …
Date: 2019-10-14

Debasement

(797 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
As long as monetary value depended on precious metal content in the early modern period, there was a risk even for the smallest copper coins of debasement, that is, an erosion of precious metal content while the nominal value remained unchanged. Gresham's Law, named for (if not actually formulated by) the English merchant and founder of the London Stock Exchange, summed up the general trend in coin money: “Bad money drives out good” [5]. The chief reasons for the displacement of coins with high precious metal content by those of reduced purity were rising pr…
Date: 2019-10-14

Münzvertrag

(936 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
In the 14th and 15th centuries in the Old Empire, there were effective monetary unions based on agreements among individual princes and cities. In 1348 the Rhenish Coinage Union was formed by the four Rhenish electors, followed by the Wendish Coinage Union of the four Hanseatic cities of Lübeck, Lüneburg, Hamburg, and Wismar, after Hamburg and Lübeck had already entered into a monetary union in 1255, which lasted until 1873 [4]. Along the Upper Rhine, the  Rappenmünzbund (“Rappen Coinage Federation”) was formed around 1400 [3]. Coinage unions in Swabia, the Lake Constance …
Date: 2020-04-06

Monometallism

(821 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
Monometallism is the use of a metallic currency based on one (and only one) metal.Until World War I, the states of Europe had metallic currencies, even though since the mid-19th century paper money backed by precious metal had also been in circulation, since its use was more convenient. But as long as there was a legal obligation to redeem the paper money for precious metal, it had to be convertible into precious metal coinage. As illustrated by a double standard or bimetallism, the linkage of gold and sil…
Date: 2020-04-06

Coin of account

(963 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
A coin of account is a monetary unit used only administratively and only for purposes of calculation or measurement. This distinguishes it from minted specie coins, which have purchasing power and serve concretely as media of exchange. The coins of account in use from the Middle Ages until the 18th century and to some extent into the 19th made it possible to record the prices of goods and the extent of payment transactions over long periods of time uniformly and in relatively long-lived units despite the multiplicity of early modern currencies,Historians working with archival mate…
Date: 2019-10-14

Peso

(867 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
The silver  peso de a ocho (Spanish  peso, “weight”), equivalent to eight reals ( reales) in the Spanish colonies in the Americas, was probably the most widely-minted coin of the early modern period, and in Spain and its former American colonies it gave way to new units of  currency only in the 19th century. It was also a popular trade coin that circulated worldwide. The peso  de a ocho was the product of a currency reform in the reign of the Catholic Monarchs, Ferdinand of Aragón and Isabella of Castile, and it was first minted - in small quantities - …
Date: 2020-10-06

Coin

(4,085 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad | Fried, Torsten
1. ConceptThe coin (from Latin  cuneus via OF  coing, “wedge,” i.e. the wedge-shaped die used to stamp metal) was long synonymous with money in the early modern period (Money economy), although even in the Middle Ages there were some forms of cashless transaction (Payment transactions), such as bill of exchange, giro transactions, and securities like bonds of debt (obligations). The first forms of paper money came into use from the second half of the 17th century, first in Sweden after 1661. Until long…
Date: 2019-10-14

Mark

(788 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
Like the pound, the mark in the early modern period was (1) a unit of mass, (2) a counting unit, and (3) a minted coin.(1) As a unit of mass, the mark was also the basis of coinage systems (Weights and measures). In Central Europe, the Cologne Mark ( c. 233 g) [9] gained general acceptance over other regional mark weights like the Nuremberg Mark ( c. 255 g) and the Vienna Mark ( c. 280 g), and the Esslingen  Reichsmünzordnung (Imperial Coinage Ordinance) of 1524 declared it the basic coin weight of the Holy Roman Empire. Standard mark weights were available at the office…
Date: 2019-10-14

Ducat

(927 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
One of the successful, early European gold coins of the Middle Ages was the zecchino (“sequin”; from Italian  zecca/zecha, coin) minted from 1284 in Venice. The obverse shows the Doge kneeling before St. Mark, the reverse a standing Christ figure - both within a mandorla. The coins acquired the name “ducat” because of the last word of the inscription ( Sit tibi Christe datus quem tu regis iste ducatus = “O, Christ, let this duchy, which you rule, be dedicated unto you”). Venetian ducats were made of the finest gold that was possible to refine at the time, an…
Date: 2019-10-14

Crown (coin)

(841 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
The monetary history of Europe (Money economy) recognizes a variety of gold and silver coins called crowns, with diverse roots. The earliest is the French gold crown ( couronne dor), which was first minted in 1385 with a crowned shield with fleurs-de-lis on the obverse and initially contained 5.55 g of fine gold. Its predecessor was the gold écu d’or (“gold shield”) first minted in 1337. After repeated changes of weight, in 1475 under King Louis XI the couronne d’or with a troy weight of 0.963 g, a normal gross weight of 3.496 g, and a net weight of 3.367 g was minted (Co…
Date: 2019-10-14

Franc

(639 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
Various coins have been minted with the denomination of franken, or  franc (the origin of the word is unclear, presumably from “France”) . As the name indicates, the coins originated in France; the oldest are 14th-century French gold coins. The French king John II authorized the  franc à cheval (with the figure of a king on horseback), along with other gold coins; and his successor Charles V added the  franc à pied (with the figure of a standing king), valued at a  livre tournois (“Tournois pound,” from Latin  libra). Regulations stipulated that they be made of pure gold wit…
Date: 2019-10-14

Kipper- und Wipperzeit

(1,091 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
1. BegriffDie Bezeichnung K.u.W. – zunächst für eine Geldkrise 1619–1623 mit Schwerpunkt im Alten Reich verwendet – stammt von »Geldkippen« genannten handlichen und weit verbreiteten Schnell-Waagen, mit deren Hilfe übergewichtige Münzen aus dem Umlauf ermittelt und »ausgekippt« (niederdt. kippen, »beschneiden«) bzw. von der Waage »gewippt« wurden, um dann eingeschmolzen und in geringerwertiges Geld umgeprägt zu werden. Dieser Vorgang war zwar illegal, aber wegen der ungleichen Gewichte des Umlaufgeldes bis ins 19. Jh. hinein üblich und Teil eine…
Date: 2019-11-19

Krone (Münze)

(705 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
Die europ. Geldgeschichte (Geldwirtschaft) kennt verschiedene Gold- und Silber-Münzen namens K., mit unterschiedlichen Wurzeln. Die älteste von ihnen ist die franz. Gold-K. ( couronne d’or), die nach 1385 mit dem gekrönten Lilienschild geprägt wurde und zunächst 5,44 g Fein-Gold enthielt. Ihre Vorgängerin wiederum war der erstmalig 1337 geprägte goldene Schild ( écu d’or). Nach wiederholten metrologischen Veränderungen wurde die couronne d’or unter König Ludwig XI. 1475 mit einem Feingehalt von 0,963 g, einem Normraugewicht von 3,496 g und einem Feingewich…
Date: 2019-11-19

Franken

(615 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
Unter der Bezeichnung F. oder franc (die Herkunft der Bezeichnung ist unklar, vermutlich von »Frankreich«) wurden verschiedene Münzen geprägt, deren Herkunft jeweils in Frankreich lag – die ältesten unter ihnen waren franz. Goldmünzen des 14. Jh.s. Der franz. König Johann II. ließ neben anderen Goldmünzen den franc à cheval (mit einer Abbildung des reitenden Königs) und sein Nachfolger Karl V. neben dem franc à cheval auch den franc à pied (Abbildung des stehenden Königs) prägen, die umgerechnet einer livre tournois (»Tourneser Pfund«, von lat. libra) entsprachen. Nach den Ver…
Date: 2019-11-19

Pfund

(671 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
Der Begriff P. (von lat. pondus, »Gewicht«) kann sich sowohl auf eine Gewichtseinheit (Maß und Gewicht) als auch auf eine Währungs-Größe beziehen. Als Währungseinheit basierte das P. ursprünglich auf dem Gewicht einer bestimmten Menge von Münzen. Erst im SpätMA wurden solche P. tatsächlich als Münzen ausgeprägt und waren als Zähl-P. lange Rechenmünzen. Dies rückt das P. in die Nähe der Zählmarken, denn die Mark entsprach im Wert in der Regel einem halben oder einem Zweidrittel-P. Auf dem europ. Kontinent setzten sich im Laufe des MA verschiedene Markgewicht…
Date: 2019-11-19

Gulden (Gold)

(795 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
Ebenso wie der Dukat entstand der G. im 13. Jh. in Italien. Er stammt von der auch Floren (ital. fiorino) genannten Münze der Stadt Florenz ab, auf der die Stadtlilie und Johannes der Täufer abgebildet waren. Er bestand zunächst aus hochfeinem Gold und wog um 3,54 g. Die Florene breiteten sich schnell aus und wurden ab 1325 auch in Ungarn geprägt, ab der Mitte des 14. Jh.s im Alten Reich. Nach Gründung des Rheinischen Münzvereins (1385/86) durch die Kurfürsten von Mainz, Trier, Köln und der Pfalz wurden große Mengen von Gold-G. geprägt und schnell zum dominierenden Zahlungsmi…
Date: 2019-11-19

Rubel

(718 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad
Der R. (russ. rubl’) ist die traditionelle russ. Währungseinheit; der Begriff bezog sich im 13./14. Jh. zunächst auf Silber-Barren zu 200 g als Gewichtsstandard und Zahlungseinheit. R. wurden noch nicht ausgeprägt, sondern dienten als Rechnungseinheit in den russ. Fürstentümern.In Moskau galt der R. zunächst nur als große Rechnungseinheit im Wert von 200 denga. Die von Jelena Glinskaja, der Mutter Iwans IV., eingeleitete russ. Währungsreform von 1534 stellte eine vereinheitlichende Beziehung zwischen dem Moskauer, Nowgoroder und Pskower Münzwesen her; man…
Date: 2019-11-19

Münze

(3,755 words)

Author(s): Schneider, Konrad | Fried, Torsten
1. BegriffDie M. (von lat. moneta) war in der europ. Nz. lange weitgehend identisch mit Geld (Geldwirtschaft). Es gab zwar bereits im MA Formen bargeldlosen Zahlungsverkehrs wie den Wechsel oder Giroverkehre und auch Wertpapiere wie Schuldverschreibungen (Obligationen). Ab der zweiten Hälfte des 17. Jh.s wurden zudem erste Formen von Papiergeld verwendet, zuerst in Schweden nach 1661. Es galt jedoch noch bis weit ins 19. Jh. nicht als Geld im eigentlichen Sinne, sondern als »Geldsurrogat«. Unter M. ist aber auch die M.-Stätte zu verstehen (s. u. 3.).Konrad Schneider2. Zahlungs…
Date: 2019-11-19
▲   Back to top   ▲