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Agamiou dike

(139 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (ἀγαμίου δίκη; agamíou díkē). In Sparta a criminal action which could be raised by anyone against someone who after reaching a certain age had not married (Plut. Lyc. 15). By means of this action an indirect compulsion to marry was exercised, as the transgressor was threatened with partial cancellation of citizen's rights. The charge may have occurred elsewhere in the domain of Doric law (cf. Str. 10,482), but there is no evidence of it in Athens. If Plato's intention (Lg. 721b; 774a…

Sitou dike

(165 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (σίτου δίκη; sítou dík ē). Literally a 'claim' for maintenance in the form of 'grain' or 'bread'. In ancient Athens, a man who, after engýēsis (establishment of husband's rights) but before cohabitation ( ékdosis [1]) with the woman concerned, had already received the dowry ( proíx ), or retained the dowry after dissolution of the marriage, had to pay the woman annual maintenance amounting to 18 % of the value of the dowry (1.5 % per month). The kýrios ('head of household') might levy sitou dike for a woman in his charge, or take up δίκη προικός ( díkē proikós, 'dowry proceedings'; Dem. Or. 59,52). According to the lexica (Anecd. Bekk. 238; Harpocr. s. v. σίτος), sitou dike might also be granted against the epítropos [2] ('guardian') of a ward (cf. Aristot. Ath. Pol. 56,7). Thür, Gerhard (Graz) Bibliography A. R. W. …

Katakremnismos

(85 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (κατακρημνισμός; katakrēmnismós). Archaic form of capital punishment by throwing the victim from a rock (at Athens into the Barathron, at Delphi - because of hierosylía - from the Hyampic Rock, in Sparta into the Caeadas). Later denounced as particularly cruel. The punishment by katakremnismos was regarded as a cultic sacrifice; if the victim survived the fall, he was exempt from further punishment. Thür, Gerhard (Graz) Bibliography G. Thür, Die Todesstrafe im Blutprozeß Athens, in: The Journ. of Juristic Papyrology 20, 1990, 143-155.

Anadikia

(132 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (ἀναδικία; anadikía). The principle that a case decided by a court could not again be the subject of a court case (for Athens Demosth. 24,54) was breached in individual cases in…

Dikazein

(182 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (δικάζειν; dikázein). The word (approxima…

Kakegoria

(166 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (κακηγορία; kakēgoría), verbal insult, an offence in Athens since the period of Solon (6th cent. BC). Deceased persons were always protected, living persons only in the case of defamation in public (Plut. Solon 21; Dem. Or. 20,104). The insulted person could file a private complaint ( dike), but had to share the c…

Enktesis

(119 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (Ἔγκτησις; Énktēsis). In the Greek states the acquisition of property was reserved to citizens. Individual foreigners were granted the privilege of énktesis, the right to acquire ‘land’ or ‘a house’ (or both) by a popular resolution. In Athens some   métoik…

Homologia

(313 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (ὁμολογία; homología), literally ‘speaking the same way’, describes in Greek colloquial language simple oral consent or agreement. In the legal sense homologia was soon also used for written agreements (  syngraphḗ ,   synthḗkē ). The legal connection with the homologia originated, as can be seen in Athens, in the preliminary procedural concession of individual assertions of the opponent. In the preliminary procedure (  anákrisis , see   diaitētaí [2]) the parties had the duty to answer each other's questions (Dem. Or. 46,10). Answering such a que…

Proeisphora

(133 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (προεισφορά/ proeisphorá, 'property tax advance'). Because the eisphorá ('property tax') in Athens yielded necessary funds too slowly in times of crisis, a liturgy [I B] to 'give an advance' as a proeisphorá on the whole of the sum to be raised, without interest, was imposed (presumably before 362 BC) on the 300 richest citizens of the city. Deducting their own contributions, they could at their own risk collect the proeisphorá from fellow members of their symmoría (tax bracket). The proeisphorá is attested also of other  democratic poleis  (e.g., Priene and Lindus…

Athenian law

(1,195 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] A. Definition and sources Strictly speaking, the correct term is ‘Athenian law’ (AL), because ‘Attic’ designates the landscape, dialect, art and culture, while Athens, by contrast, refers to the polis and the state; but in German scholarship…

Kleter

(192 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (κλητήρ; klētḗr). On the basis of the word, a person who has to do with the summons to legal proceedings ( klḗsis, prósklesis ). 1. In the Delian League, state-appointed klētḗres summoned people to legal proceedings that were held in conjunction with the tributes (IG I3 21,42 and 68,48/49: 426/5 BC; 71,39: 425/4 BC). 2. In civil proceedings the summons were a matter for the plaintiff. In Athens two klētḗres were as a rule consulted in this regard (detailed regulation outlined in Pl. Leg. 846c) whose names were noted on the statement of claim. If th…

Hypoboles graphe

(89 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (ὑποβολῆς γραφή; hypobolês graphé). Civil suit against a person who was passed off as the child of a citizen. Such false children, usually bought as slaves, are frequently mentioned in Attic court speeches and  comedies: childless women attempted to consolidate their position in the household in this manner, but hypoboles graphe is only known from the Lexica Segueriana V [2]. The penalty for being a false child was being sold into slavery. Thür, Gerhard (Graz) Bibliography 1 I. Bekker (ed.), Anecdota Graeca I, 1814/1865, 311 2 Lipsius, 417.

Hyperocha

(263 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] Literally ‘surplus’ (τὰ ὑπέροχα, tà hypérocha, or ἡ ὑπεροχή, hē hyperochḗ), technically it designates the extra value by which the value of the secured object exceeds the amount of the secured debt, Latin superfluum. As the Greek pledge is to be understood strictly as a lapsed pledge (cf.   hypothḗkē ), it necessitated special contractual or judicial regulations if the extra value was intended to serve as security for a further creditor or return to the security debtor following sale of the security. Multiple m…

Doron graphe

(159 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (Δώρων γραφή; Dṓrōn graphḗ) . In Athens, the charge of corruptibility (Poll. 8,42), also including the corruptibility of a judge. Active bribery in connection with jurisdiction was prosecuted with   dekasmoû graphḗ . The offence consisted in presents given to, and accepted by, officials, among whom the lawyers in public and private trials were also counted (Dem. Or. 46,26), to the detriment of the state (Lys. 21,22: ἐπὶ τῆς πόλεως κακῷ; Dem. Or. 21,113: ἐπὶ βλάβῃ τοῦ δήμου). The charge was filed in lighter cases with the   logistaí , in graver cases with the   thesmothêtai

Eranos

(210 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
(ἔρανος; éranos). Etymology uncertain; the word originally meant ‘a meal for friends’ (Hom. Od., Pind.). The cost was borne in common by the participants. Collections made among friends in order to present a gift to one of them were also called éranoi; to give gifts in return was merely customary, not a statutory obligation (Theophr. Char. 17,9). Two legal institutions developed on this basis: [German version] [1] Collective fund A kind of collective wealth. Funds ( eisphoraí) collected by a group of individuals ( plērōtaí, Dem. Or. 21,184f.) were applied to a particular purpos…

Hypomosia

(159 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (ὑπωμοσία; hypōmosía). In Athens there were two types of sworn statements: 1. in the court proceeding one party could apply in person or through a representative for sojournment (Dem. Or. 48,25f.; schol. Dem. Or. 21,84) if there was significant cause, such as travel or funerary duties. The opponent was able to dispute this with a ἀντωμοσία ( antōmosía, counter-oath). 2. If an application was deliberated in the council (  boulḗ ) or the popular assembly (  ekklēsía ), every citizen was able to declare through a hypomosia that he would bring a suit against the applic…

Klope

(317 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (κλοπή; klopḗ). Theft, misappropriation and receiving stolen goods. Robbery, misappropriation of temple property ( hierosylía ) on the one hand and pickpocketing by people doing general damage ( balantiotómoi , kakoúrgoi ) on the other hand was distinguished from klopḗ in Athens. Klopḗ of private property could be prosecuted by díkē only by the victim of the theft; a graphḗ on the grounds of klopḗ of state property is unlikely, as there were other processes ( eúthynai , eisangelía ). A thief at night could be killed without incurring punis…

Antitimesis

(102 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (ἀντιτίμησις; antitímēsis). If the law in Athens had not already fixed the penalty in advance in public trials (ἀγῶνες ἀτιμητοί,   atimetos agon), but type and level had been left to the discretion of the court (ἀγῶνες τιμητοί,   timetos agon), the plaintiff had to estimate the suit when the plea was submitted. After being convicted, the defendant could then, in a second hearing on the sentence, file a counter-submission on the level of the sentence ( antitimesis). The judges had to choose between these two submissions for sentence. Thür, Gerhard (Graz) Bibliography A. R.…

Dikasterion

(918 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
(δικαστήριον ; dikastḗrion). A. Athens [German version] 1. Court site There were two types of court sites, those at which homicidal crimes were judged (φονικά, phoniká) and those at which other public or private suits were negotiated. The former, of which there were five, were at the edge of the town for ritual reasons and had no roof to avoid being tarnished by the accused (Antiph. 5,11; Aristot. Ath. Pol. 57,4) while the latter were at the market or in its immediate vicinity. Except for the two largest ones, the Hēliaía (Ἡλιαία) and the site of the   ekklēsía (ἐκκλησία), they had a roof. The pho…

Pseudokleteias graphe

(260 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz)
[German version] (ψευδοκλητείας γραφή; pseudoklēteías graphḗ). In Athens, the summons to a trial ( prósklēsis ) was conducted privately in the presence of summoning witnesses ( klētḗr ). Anyone who did not appear before the judicial magistrate on the scheduled date despite a properly witnessed summoning was convicted in absentia. If he was able to prove exculpatory reasons, a reopening of the matter ( anadikía ) was possible; if the plaintiff called in false klētḗres, any citizen (see graphḗ ) could prosecute them with PG. The thesmothétai were responsible, the…
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