Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)" )' returned 20 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Crafts, Trade

(7,461 words)

Author(s): van de Mieroop, Marc (New York) | Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel) | Pingel, Volker (Bochum) | Bieg, Gebhard (Tübingen) | Burford-Cooper, Alison (Ann Arbor) | Et al.
[German version] I. Ancient Orient and Egypt Crafts in Egypt, in Syria-Palestine and in Mesopotamia can be best categorized by the materials employed: stone, bone and other animal products, clay and glass, metals, wood, wool and flax and leather, as well as reed and plant fibres. These were used to make objects of the most varied kinds, from cooking-pots to finely worked pieces of jewellery. For the building trade, stone, clay, reed and wood were important. For the investigation of the various forms of…

Landlordism

(630 words)

Author(s): Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[German version] The term landlordism is not documented by contemporary sources; it is a term of classification of agrarian and social structure which first arose during the transition to the modern era and designates a conglomerate of rent-bearing powers of control over ‘land and people’ which is typical for the European Middle Ages and the Ancien Régime [7]. Therefore, all applications of this term to other circumstances - including Roman antiquity - are misleading at best. M. Weber's [10] clear…

Price

(3,822 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | von Reden, Sitta (Bristol) | Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[German version] I. Ancient Near East Prices or equivalents for numerous fungible items had a generally recognized value in both Egypt and Mesopotamia, though nothing is known of how this came about. Prices in Egypt were at first expressed in a value unit šn( tj) (perhaps 'silver ring'?), in the New Kingdom also in copper and sacks of grain (though neither served as media of exchange) [7. 13]. In Mesopotamia, they were generally expressed in weights of silver (in Assyria, occasionally also tin). Indications as to equivalents are preserved to varying degrees of abundance and …

Commerce

(8,308 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Briese, Christoph (Randers) | Bieg, Gebhard (Tübingen) | de Souza, Philip (Twickenham) | Drexhage, Hans-Joachim (Marburg) | Et al.
[German version] I. Ancient Orient (Egypt, South-West Asia, India) Archaeologically attested since the Neolithic and documented since the 3rd millennium BC, long-distance or overland commerce -- as opposed to exchange and allocation of goods on a local level according to daily needs -- was founded on the necessity for ensuring the supply of so-called strategic goods (metal, building timber) not available domestically, as well as on the demand for luxury and prestige goods, or the materials required for producing them. In historical times, the organization of commerce was a…

Social structure

(4,590 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Müller-Wollermann, Renate | Gehrke, Hans-Joachim (Freiburg) | Schneider, Helmuth (Kassel) | Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[German version] I. Ancient Near East Social structure in the ancient Orient was determined by who controlled the fundamental means of production in an agrarian society, the arable land. The usual form of government in such societies was a patrimonial monarchy. Palaces and temples were the institutional centres dominating the economic and social structures and developments, especially in Egypt and Mesopotamia; all parts of society were directly or indirectly incorporated into this system. The existenc…

Money, money economy

(6,610 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | von Reden, Sitta (Bristol) | Crawford, Michael Hewson (London) | Morrisson, Cécile (Paris) | Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient and Egypt As early as the beginning of the 3rd millennium BC metals (copper and silver, later also tin and gold) fulfilled monetary functions as a medium of exchange, a means of payment for religious, legal or other liabilities, a measure of value and a means of storing wealth. Until the 1st millennium fungible goods, primarily corn, also served as a medium of exchange and measure of value. Economies in the Near East and Egypt were characterised by subsistence production, self-sufficient palace and oîkos economies. The need for goods or services w…

Slavery

(5,179 words)

Author(s): Neumann, Hans (Berlin) | Müller-Wollermann, Renate | Gehrke, Hans-Joachim (Freiburg) | Heinrichs, Johannes (Bonn) | Prinzing, Günther | Et al.
[German version] I. Ancient Near East Mesopotamian cuneiform texts attest to slavery in the ancient Near East from the early 3rd millennium BC [1]. However, at no time were slaves the essential producers in the structure of the total economy [2]. From the 3rd-1st millennia BC, slaves were primarily deployed in private households, and to a lesser extent in institutional households (Palace, Temple). The main sources thus mostly come from the field of private law and governmental legislation [3]. Some of…

Market

(2,086 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | von Reden, Sitta (Bristol) | Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient and Egypt The concept of the market is the subject of controversial discussions in classical Middle Eastern studies and Egyptology, since there was no term, neither in the Mesopotamian area nor in Egypt, that clearly designated the market as a place and a modus operandi. Background of the discussion are, on the one hand, the studies regarding pre-modern societies inspired by K. Polanyi (among others by M. Finley for the classical world), according to which a market did not exist as a system of supply and dema…

Agriculture

(7,403 words)

Author(s): Hruška, Blahoslav (Prague) | Pingel, Volker (Bochum) | Schneider, Helmuth (Kassel) | Osborne, Robin (Oxford) | Schreiner, Peter (Cologne) | Et al.
I. Near East and Egypt [German version] A. Introduction In the Near Orient (particularly the southern Levant and Syria) and Egypt, a fundamental change in the history of mankind occurred 12,000 years ago: the transition from the hunter-gatherer life of paleolithic times to neolithic agrarian society. In the so-called ‘fertile crescent’ and in Egypt, agriculture almost always included livestock farming. Agriculture also encompassed the planting of fruit trees, viticulture and horticulture. The methods of food production led to increasing freedom from dependency on e…

Wages

(1,443 words)

Author(s): Neumann, Hans (Berlin) | Andreau, Jean (Paris) | Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[German version] I. Ancient Near East There is evidence of wages as recompense for work done by labourers hired for limited periods in Mesopotamia from the mid 3rd millennium BC to the late Babylonian period (2nd half of 1st millennium BC), in Hittite Anatolia (2nd half of 2nd millennium BC) and in Egypt (from the Old Kingdom on). In Mesopotamia, the institutional households (Palace; Temple) of the Ur III period in particular (21st cent. BC) supplemented their own labour force (which received rations …

Family

(7,857 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Feucht, Erika (Heidelberg) | Macuch, Maria (Berlin) | Gehrke, Hans-Joachim (Freiburg) | Deißmann-Merten, Marie-Luise (Freiburg) | Et al.
[German version] I. Ancient Orient The family in Mesopotamia was organized in a patrilineal manner; remnants of matrilineal family structures are to be found in Hittite myths, among the Amorite nomads of the early 2nd millennium BC and the Arab tribes of the 7th cent. BC. As a rule monogamy was predominant; marriage to concubines with lesser rights was possible, while there is evidence of polygamy particularly in the ruling families. The family consisted of a married couple and their children althoug…

Familie

(6,726 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Feucht, Erika (Heidelberg) | Macuch, Maria (Berlin) | Gehrke, Hans-Joachim (Freiburg) | Deißmann-Merten, Marie-Luise (Freiburg) | Et al.
[English version] I. Alter Orient Die F. in Mesopot. war patrilinear organisiert; Reste von matrilinearen F.-Strukturen finden sich in hethit. Mythen, bei den amoritischen Nomaden des frühen 2. Jt. v.Chr. sowie den arab. Stämmen des 7. Jh. v.Chr. In der Regel herrschte Monogamie; Heirat mit Nebenfrauen minderen Rechts war möglich, Polygamie ist v.a. in den Herrscher-F. bezeugt. Die F. bestand aus dem Elternpaar und seinen Kindern, über deren Zahl keine verläßlichen Angaben möglich sind. Unverheiratete Brüder des F.-Oberhauptes konnten Teil der F. sein. Die Funktion der F. al…

Markt

(1,815 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | von Reden, Sitta (Bristol) | Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[English version] I. Alter Orient und Ägypten Das Konzept des M.s wird in der Altorientalistik und der Ägyptologie kontrovers diskutiert, da es weder im mesopot. Raum noch in Äg. ein Wort dafür gab, das eindeutig den M. als Ort und als Operationsmodus bezeichnet. Hintergrund der Diskussion sind auf der einen Seite die von K. Polanyi inspirierten Forsch. zu vormod. Gesellschaften (u.a. für die klass. Welt von M. Finley), wonach ein M. als ein System von Angebot und Nachfrage mit dem Resultat von Preisbi…

Lohn

(1,285 words)

Author(s): Neumann, Hans (Berlin) | Andreau, Jean (Paris) | Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[English version] I. Alter Orient L. als Entgelt für geleistete Arbeit befristet gemieteter Arbeitskräfte läßt sich in Mesopot. seit Mitte des 3. Jt.v.Chr. bis in spätbabylon. Zeit (2. H. 1. Jt.v.Chr.), im hethit. Anatolien (2. H. 2. Jt.v.Chr.) und in Ägypten (seit dem AR) nachweisen. In Mesopot. ergänzten insbesondere die institutionellen Haushalte (Palast; Tempel) der Ur III-Zeit (21. Jh.v.Chr.) mit der saisonalen Inanspruchnahme von L.-Arbeit v.a. in der Landwirtschaft, im Transportwesen und im Ha…

Geld, Geldwirtschaft

(6,043 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | von Reden, Sitta (Bristol) | Crawford, Michael Hewson (London) | Morrisson, Cécile (Paris) | Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[English version] I. Alter Orient und Ägypten Bereits zu Beginn des 3. Jt. v.Chr. haben Metalle (Kupfer und Silber, später auch Zinn und Gold) die G.-Funktionen als Tauschmittel oder Tauschvermittler, Zahlungsmittel für rel., rechtliche oder sonstige Verpflichtungen, Wertmesser und Schatzmittel erfüllt. Daneben haben bis ins 1. Jt. vertretbare Güter, v.a. Getreide, als Tauschmittel und Wertmesser gedient. Wirtschaft im vorderen Orient und Ägypten war durch Subsistenzproduktion, autarke Palast- und Oiko…

Handwerk

(6,532 words)

Author(s): van de Mieroop, Marc (New York) | Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel) | Pingel, Volker (Bochum) | Bieg, Gebhard (Tübingen) | Burford-Cooper, Alison (Ann Arbor) | Et al.
[English version] I. Alter Orient und Ägypten Das H. in Äg., in Syrien-Palästina und in Mesopot. läßt sich am besten anhand der verwendeten Materialien kategorisieren: Stein, Knochen und andere tierische Produkte, Ton und Glas, Metalle, Holz, Wolle und Flachs, Leder sowie Rohr und Pflanzenfasern. Daraus verfertigte man Gegenstände verschiedenster Art, vom Kochtopf bis zum fein gearbeiteten Schmuckstück. Für das Bau-H. waren Stein, Ton, Rohr und Holz wichtig. Für die Untersuchung verschiedener Formen de…

Handel

(7,587 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Briese, Christoph (Randers) | Bieg, Gebhard (Tübingen) | de Souza, Philip (Twickenham) | Drexhage, Hans-Joachim (Marburg) | Et al.
[English version] I. Alter Orient (Ägypten, Vorderasien, Indien) Fern- oder Überland-H. - im Gegensatz zu Austausch und Allokation von Gütern des tägl. Bedarfs auf lokaler Ebene -, im Alten Orient arch. seit dem Neolithikum, in Texten seit dem 3. Jt. v.Chr. belegt, beruhte auf der Notwendigkeit, die Versorgung mit sog. strategischen Gütern (Metallen, Bauholz) sicherzustellen, die im eigenen Territorium nicht vorhanden waren, sowie auf dem Bedürfnis nach Luxus- und Prestigegütern bzw. den dafür benötigten Materialien. In histor. Zeit lag die Organisation des H. in der …

Grundherrschaft

(534 words)

Author(s): Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[English version] G. ist kein durch zeitgenössische Quellen belegter, sondern ein erst im Übergang zur Moderne entstandener Ordnungsbegriff der Agrar- und Sozialverfassung, der ein für das europ. MA und das Ancien Régime typisches Konglomerat rententragender Verfügungsgewalt über “Land und Leute” meint [7]. Insofern sind alle Übertragungen dieses Begriffs - auch auf die röm. Ant. - eher irreführend. Klass. bleibt M. Webers [10] klare Abgrenzung der G. von der ant. bzw. neuzeitlichen Plantage und der Gutsherrschaft im Rahmen seiner Idealtypologie des Herreneigentums. Zur Ents…

Landwirtschaft

(6,774 words)

Author(s): Hruška, Blahoslav (Prag) | Pingel, Volker (Bochum) | Schneider, Helmuth (Kassel) | Osborne, Robin (Oxford) | Schreiner, Peter (Köln) | Et al.
I. Vorderasien und Ägypten [English version] A. Einleitung Im Vorderen Orient (bes. südl. Levante und Syrien) und Äg. ereignete sich vor etwa 12000 Jahren eine tiefgreifende Wende in der Gesch. der Menschheit: der Übergang vom Jäger- und Sammlertum des Paläolithikum zur Ackerbaugesellschaft des Neolithikum. Ackerbau wurde im sog. “Fruchtbaren Halbmond” und in Äg. fast immer mit Viehhaltung verbunden. Die L. umfaßte auch Anpflanzung von Fruchtbäumen, Weinbau und Gartenkultur. Die Methoden der Nahrungserzeugung führten zu steigender Unabhängigkeit gegenüber den Zu…

Preis

(3,508 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | von Reden, Sitta (Bristol) | Kuchenbuch, Ludolf (Hagen)
[English version] I. Alter Orient Preise oder Äquivalente für zahlreiche vertretbare Sachen hatten sowohl in Äg. als auch in Mesopotamien einen allgemein anerkannten Wert, über dessen Zustandekommen aber nichts bekannt ist. P. wurden in Äg. zunächst meist in einer Werteinheit šn( tj) (vielleicht “Silberring”?), im NR auch in Kupfer und Sack Getreide (die beide aber nicht als Austauschmedium dienten) [7. 13], in Mesopot. meist in gewogenem Silber (zuweilen in Assyrien auch in Zinn) ausgedrückt. Angaben über Äquivalente sind in unterschiedlicher Dichte und Aussagekraf…