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Lelante

(51 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Ληλάντη; Lēlántē). Wife of the mythological Molossian king Munichus and mother of Alcander among others. When the god-fearing family is attacked by robbers and their house is set alight, they are transformed into birds by Zeus so they can be saved (Antoninus Liberalis 14). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Pelanos

(150 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (πελανός; pelanós), a more or less liquid gruel or dough, which could also contain honey, oil, poppies, milk or wine, was thrown in the fire as a sacrificial offering and burnt or poured out (cf. Aesch. Pers. 203f.; Eur. Ion 226f.; 705-707). According to Theophrastus (in Porph. De abstinentia 2,29) pelanos assumed increasingly refined forms in the course of its historical development. The dough was finally mixed and baked into flat bread, cakes or pancakes. P elanos itself, however, was never eaten. It was particularly common as a sacrificial offering  in…

Caphene

(58 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Καφένη; Kaphénē). Carian maiden, who, out of love for the Melian Nymphius betrays her people by divulging their plan to invite the Melians to a feast so as to kill them underhandedly. Instead, the Carians were slain. In return, C. becomes the wife of Nymphius (Plut. Mor. 246d-247a, 207f.; Polyaen. 8,46). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Loxias

(117 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λοξίας; Loxías). Epiclesis of the god Apollo (Pind. Pyth. 3,28; Pind. Isthm. 7,49; Hdt. 1,91; 4,163; Aesch. Sept. 618; Soph. OT 853). It is striking that the combination Apollo L. does not occur; the reference to Apollo as a Delphian oracle god, however, is clear (cf. l.c.). If the name L. is derived from loxós ‘bent’, ‘crooked’, then it refers to Apollo's dark and confusing oracles (Lucian. Iupp. trag. 28; Plut. Mor. 511b). According to the schol. to Callimachus, Apollo is named L. because he is said to have been brought up by Lox…

Neikos

(111 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Νεῖκος; Neîkos). Personification of hate and strife in Hesiod's creation mythology (Hes. Theog. 229). The goddess Eris, the daughter of Nyx, gives birth to the forces of evil: N., Pseudeis ( pseudeís, lies) and Logoi ( lógoi, wicked talk). In Timon [1. fr. 21], he is named as the brother and servant of Eris. In Empedocles' [1] theory of the origins of the world, N. is the principle of repulsion and separation, the antithesis of Philotes ( philótēs, love). N.  causes the cosmos and the current world to be created from the sphairos where all the forces were mixed together. Frey, …

Oxylus

(215 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
(Ὄξυλος; Óxylos). [German version] [1] Son of Ares and Protogenia Son of Ares and Protogenia (Apollod. 1,59). Frey, Alexandra (Basle) [German version] [2] Aetolian, King of Elis Aetolian, King of Elis. The Heraclidae who according to an oracular utterance were searching for a three-eyed ( trióphthalmos) leader, found him in O. who encountered them while he was riding on a horse (mule) and, because he had lost an eye through being shot with an arrow, was actually three-eyed (together with the animal). He was on the return journey from a yea…

Cerebia

(50 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Κηρεβία; Kērebía). Wife of Poseidon, mother of  Dictys [1] and  Polydectes, who rules over the Cycladean island of Seriphus (schol. Lycoph. 838). But according to Hesiod (fr. 6 Rzach) and Apollodorus (1,88), Magnes and a Naead are the parents of both of them. Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Laelaps

(81 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
(Λαῖλαψ/ Laîlaps, ‘hurricane’). [German version] [1] Dog of Cephalus The dog of Cephalus, inescapable because of its swiftness. L. is turned to stone during the chase (Ov. Met. 7,771ff.; Hyg. Fab. 189; Serv. Aen. 6,445). Frey, Alexandra (Basle) [German version] [2] Dog of Actaeon Dog of Actaeon that, together with the rest of a pack of hounds, attacks and kills his master who has been transformed into a stag by Artemis (Ov. Met. 3,211; Hyg. Fab. 181). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Norax

(44 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Νῶραξ/ Nôrax). Son of Hermes and Erytheia, daughter of Geryoneus. According to legend, N. led the Iberians out of Spanish Tartessus to Sardinia, and founded the first town there, which was named Nora [1] after him (Paus. 10,17,5). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Lycopeus

(71 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λυκωπεύς; Lykōpeús). Son of the Aetolian hero Agrius [1] who, together with his brothers, dethrones his uncle Oeneus in Calydon in favour of his father. As a result, L., together with his brothers - with the exception of two of them -, is killed by Diomedes [1] (Apollod. 1,77f.; Paus. 2,25,2) or by Tydeus (Diod. Sic. 4,65,2), and Agrius is dethroned (Hyg. Fab. 242). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Lacinius

(129 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λακίνιος, Λακῖνος; Lakínios, Lakînos). Iapygian king who ruled over the land of the Bruttii; eponym of the Lacinium Mountains near Croton. L. took in Croton, who had been banished from Corcyra, and gave him his daughter Laure (or Laurete) in marriage (schol. Lycoph. 1007; schol. Theoc. 4,33b). When Heracles [1] returned from his Geryon adventure, he came into conflict with L. Concerning the cause of this, there are two variant accounts: either L. refused hospitality to Heracles, c…

Lycabas

(199 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
(Λυκάβας; Lykábas). [German version] [1] One of the Tyrrhenian pirates One of the Tyrrhenian pirates, exiled for murder. The pirates promise the boy Dionysus to take him to the island of Naxos, but intend to abduct him. Their leader Acoetes [1] refuses to support the plan because he recognizes a god in the boy, but L. strikes him down. For their heinous deeds, Dionysus transforms the whole crew into dolphins, apart from Acoetes, whom he spares (Ov. Met. 3,623ff.; Hyg. Fab. 134). Frey, Alexandra (Basle) [German version] [2] On of the Centaurs One of the Centaurs who sexually assault th…

Ceteii

(56 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Κήτειοι; Kḗteioi). Warriors of  Eurypylus [2] (Hom. Od. 11,521; Str. 13,1,69f.), whose origin is in Mysian Theutrania in western Asia Minor (schol. Hom. loc. cit.). The name C. is interpreted variously: either as ‘the Great ones’ or as derived from the river Ceteius (Hsch. s.v. K.; Str. loc. cit.). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Cragaleus

(126 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Κραγαλεύς). Son of  Dryops in the land of Dryope. C., who is wise and just, is chosen by  Apollo,  Artemis, and  Hercules to act as arbitrator in their dispute about the Epirote city  Ambracia. Apollo demands the city for himself because his son rules the land of Dryope. Artemis demands it because she had liberated the city from a tyrant, and Hercules because he defeated the Celts, the Thesproteans and the Epiroteans. C. awards the city to Hercules and in return is changed into a…

Nycteus

(155 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Νυκτεύς/ Nukteús). Son of Hyrieus and the nymph Clonia, and hence, through his father, the grandson of Poseidon (Apollod. 3,111). Alternatively, Hyginus says he is the son of Poseidon and Celaeno [1] (Hyg. Poet. Astr. 2,21). N. and his brother Lycus [6] fled from Hyria to Thebes after killing Phlegyas. In Thebes, N. was king and guardian of his grandson Labdacus, whom Polydorus fathered with N.'s daughter Nycteis (Paus. 2,6,2). When N.'s second daughter, Antiope [1], was impregnated by Zeus and fled to Sicyon and married its king, Epopeus, N. commi…

Nessus

(212 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Νέσσος/ Néssos, Νέσος/ Nésos). Centaur, son of Ixion and Nephele [2] (= Nubes), who, after the war of the Lapiths (Lapithae) and the centaurs, flees to the river Euenus (= Lycormas), where he works as a ferryman (Apollod. 2,86). When Heracles [1] and his wife Deianira want to cross the river, N. helps Deianira, carrying her across the water, while Heracles walks or swims (Ov. Met. 9,101ff.) to the other side. In the middle of the river, N. wants to rape Deianira. Heracles shoots N. …

Laogoras

(63 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Λαογόρας; Laogóras). Dryopian king who by holding a banquet in the manner of his people in the grove of Apollo offends against the god. L. supports the Lapith prince Coronus in his attack on the Dorian king Aegimius [1]. The latter calls Hercules for help, who then kills L. and Coronus (Apollod. 2,154f.; Diod. Sic. 4,37,3). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)

Cocalus

(119 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Κώκαλος; Kṓkalos; Lat. Cocalus). Mythical king, who took over control of Sicily after the destruction of the  Cyclopes (Just. Epit. 4,2,2). He allowed  Daedalus [1], who was fleeing from the Cretan king  Minos, into the city  Camicus (in Paus. 7,4,6 Inykos), as also Minos who was pursuing him; the latter, however, he then had killed in a shower of hot water (schol. Hom. Il. 2,145; Apollod. [see authors/works] 1,14f.) that his daughters poured down on him through the bathroom ceili…

Laias

(112 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
(Λαίας, Λαΐας; Laías, Laïas). [German version] [1] Son of the Aegid Hyraeus Son of the Aegid Hyraeus. Together with his brothers, L. erected heroic sanctuaries in Sparta to Cadmus and Aegeus, among others, because the Aegids trace themselves to the Theban dynasty (Paus. 3,15,8; Hdt. 4,147). Frey, Alexandra (Basle) [German version] [2] Son of Oxylus Son of Oxylus, king of Elis, and Pieria. After the death of his older brother Aetolus, L. takes over the kingdom from his father; L.'s children, however, do not receive the royal title (Paus. 5,4,4f.). A…

Cillas

(72 words)

Author(s): Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
[German version] (Κίλλας; Kíllas, also Kíllos, Κίλλος). C., who according to the Troezenian legend is called Sphaerus, is the charioteer of  Pelops (Paus. 5,10,7; schol. Eur. Or. 990). On the way to a chariot race with Oenomaus, Cillas falls into the sea at Lesbos and drowns. Pelops erects a memorial to him, a temple of Apollo Killaios and founds the town of Cilla (Theopompus 339 FHG 1). Frey, Alexandra (Basle)
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