Collected Courses of the Hague Academy of International Law

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Some Aspects of Law and Diplomacy (Volume 91)

(37,939 words)

Author(s): Cross Dillard, Hardy
Cross Dillard, Hardy Keywords: International disputes | Diplomacy | International law | Mots clefs: Différends internationaux | Diplomatie | Droit international | ABSTRACT The objective of Hardy Cross Dillard's course on Some Aspects of Law and Diplomacy is to make an inquiry and to elicit more questions than answers. This survey focuses on the role of law and diplomacy in conflict management. The author is induced to make this inquiry by the decision of the United States Supreme Court on racial discrimination. Le cours de Hardy Cross Dillard sur certains aspects du droit et …

Le traitement des différends internationaux par le conseil de sécurité (Volume 85)

(35,805 words)

Author(s): Jiménez De Aréchaga, Eduardo
Jiménez De Aréchaga, Eduardo Keywords: United Nations | Security Council | International disputes | Mots clefs: Nations Unies | Conseil de sécurité | Différends internationaux | ABSTRACT Eduardo Jimenez de Arechaga points out in the introduction to his course that Article 1, Paragraph 1, of the Charter of the United Nations defines the purpose of the United Nations as follows: "To maintain international peace and security”. The same paragraph indicates the means to achieve this goal: collective measures of prevention and …

International Law and the Avoidance, Containment and Resolution of Disputes General Course on Public International Law (Volume 230)

(126,477 words)

Author(s): Higgins, Rosalyn
Higgins, Rosalyn Keywords: International disputes | Public international law | Mots clefs: Différends internationaux | Droit international public | ABSTRACT In this course, Rosalyn Higgins, Professor at the London School of Economics and Political Science, has two main tasks. First, he attempts to show that an essential and inevitable choice must be made between the perception of international law as a system of neutral rules and international law as a decision-making system directed toward the realization of claim…