Context of Scripture Online

Search

Your search for 'tei_subject:"Building and Display Inscriptions"' returned 112 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Nur-Adad (2.99B)

(159 words)

Contributor(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Early Old Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary A Sumerian clay cone records Nur-Adad’s construction of Enki’s abzu temple at Eridu. Nur-Adad (2.99B) ( 1–3) [For] the god En[ki], lord of Eridu, [his] lord, ( 4–8) Nur-[Adad], mighty man, provider of Ur, king of Larsa, subduer of the foreign land for the god Utu, ( 9–16) when he had restored Ur and Larsa, had resettled their scattered people in their residence, their captive people … the foundation tru[ly …

The Calaḫ Annals (2.117A)

(2,314 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary In the final years of Tiglath-pileser’s reign,1 the royal scribes composed what became the final “full” edition of his Annals, made up of seventeen palû’s (or regnal years). This edition was inscribed between two registers of reliefs on stone slabs already in place decorating the walls of Tiglath-pileser’s palace at Calah (Nimrud). However, the palace was…

Nabonidus (2.123)

(33 words)

Contributor(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary The Sippar Cylinder of Nabonidus Nabonidus’ Rebuilding of E-lugal-galga-sisa, The Ziggurat of Ur Nabonidus (2.123)

The Cylinder Inscription (2.118H)

(238 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary Discovered at Khorsabad, the text is inscribed on four barrel cylinders (two in the Louvre at Paris and two in the British Museum in London). The inscription commemorates the founding of Sargon’s new capital at Dūr-Šarrukīn. The Cylinder Inscription (2.118H) ( lines 19–20)1 (Sargon) who subjugated the extensive land of Bīt-Ḫumria (Israel), who inflicted a decisive defeat on Egypt at Rap…

Summary Inscription 9–10 (2.117F)

(983 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary The text is written on a large, very fragmentary clay tablet1 (18.4 cm wide) which was recovered in excavations at Nimrud in 1955. The reverse of the tablet preserves narrations of Tiglath-pileser’s Levantine campaigns, arranged geographically and set off by rulings across the surface of the tablet. Summary Inscription 10 (K 2649),2 following Tadmor’s designation (1994:180), is a tiny fragment (2.×.…

Ur-dukuga (2.97)

(258 words)

Author(s): Frayne, Douglas
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Early Old Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary A Sumerian cone inscription of Ur-dukuga, the thirteenth king of the Isin I dynasty (who reigned ca. 1830–1828 bce), records the construction of a temple of the god Dagan in the royal city of Isin. Dagan was an important Mesopotamian and West Semitic deity with major cult centres at ancient Tuttul (modern Tell Biʿa near the junction of the Euphrates and Balih rivers) and Terqa (m…

Larsa Dynasty (2.LARSA)

(92 words)

Contributor(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Early Old Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary The city of Larsa (modern Sinkara) struggled with Isin for hegemony over the land of Sumer and Akkad in early Old Babylonian times. The site has been dug by a series of French expeditions in 1933–34 and 1967 (directed by A. Parrot), 1969–70 (directed by J.-Cl. Margueron) and since 1970 (directed by J.-L. Huot). The names of fourteen kings of the Larsa dynasty are known; they reigned from ca. 2025–1763 bce. Larsa Dy…

Neo-Babylonian Inscriptions (2.AK.A.5)

(308 words)

Author(s): Beaulieu, Paul-Alain
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions Commentary After the fall of the Assyrian Empire at the end of the 7th century bce, power shifted back to Babylon, whose rulers inherited most of the territories formerly ruled by the kings of Assyria. During this relatively short but brilliant period (626–539 bce) the kings of the Neo-Babylonian dynasty embellished their capital with numerous architectural wonders. They also extensively rebuilt the temples of Babylonia,1 which had been left in a …

Isin Dynasty (2.ISIN)

(104 words)

Contributor(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Early Old Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary Hegemony over the land of Sumer and Akkad eventually passed from Akkad (e) to Ur ( COS COSB.2.138–141) and from Ur to Isin with the collapse of the Ur III state ca. 2004 bce. Isin, the new center of power, was located at modern Ishan Baḥriyat. The site has been excavated since 1973 by an expedition of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft under …

Ibbi-Sin (2.141B)

(324 words)

Author(s): Frayne, Douglas
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Sumerian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Sumerian Inscriptions Commentary An inscription known from an Old Babylonian tablet copy deals with Ibbi-Sin’s fashioning of a golden šikkatu vessel (Sumerian BUR-ŠAGAN, Akkadian pūr šikkatu) “a large container used for the storage of oil” from gold that had been taken as booty from Susa. An idea of the kind of motifs that may have decorated this vessel may be gained by studying the iconographic elements adorning Early D…

Inscription of Sargon: Foundation of the Akkadian Empire (2.89)

(512 words)

Author(s): Kienast, Burkhart
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Old Akkadian Inscriptions Commentary This inscription, originally carved on the socle of a statue, is preserved only on two clay tablets containing a collection of several inscriptions of Sargon (2334–2279 bce), Rīmuš (2278–2270 bce) and Maništūsu (2269–2255 bce). The text deals with the defeat of Lugalzagesi of Uruk and his allies, a victory which eventually led to the foundation of the Akkadian Empire. Inscription of Sargon: Foundation of t…

Antakya Stela (2.114A)

(664 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary This inscription is carefully incised on a stone stela which was discovered by a farmer digging a well near the Orontes river about 1.5 km outside the city of Antakya (undoubtedly in the ancient territory of Unqi, see Hawkins 1995b:96). While the stela is damaged on the left side, from top to bottom, and on the top and top right corner, it records cle…

Amar-Suena (2.140B)

(239 words)

Author(s): Frayne, Douglas
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Sumerian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Sumerian Inscriptions Commentary A thirteen-line brick inscription from Eridu (modern Abu Shahrain) records Amar-Suena’s construction of Enki’s abzu temple. Sumerian abzu “sweet underground source” may conceivably be connected with the “abyss” of Gen 7:11, but the connection is far from certain. Abu Shahrain was excavated by Loftus in 1849, Taylor in 1855, Thompson in 1918, Hall in 1919, and by a team of Iraqi ar…

Sennacherib (2.119)

(45 words)

Contributor(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary Sennacherib’s First Campaign: Against Merodach-baladan Sennacherib’s Siege of Jerusalem Sennacherib — Lachish Relief Inscription Sennacherib: the “Azekah” Inscription Sennacherib: the Capture and Destruction of Babylon Sennacherib (2.119)

Kurbaʾil Statue (2.113E)

(485 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary Engraved on a statue of Shalmaneser (measuring 103 cm in height), the text belongs to Recension E of his annals. Since the last regnal year narrated is the twentieth, the statue must date to 839–838 bce. While it belongs to the same recension as the Marble Slab ( COS COSB.2.113D), the narrative concerning Shalmaneser’s eighteenth year campaign against Hazael more closely follows that of the Calaḫ Bulls ( COS

Ur-Nammu (2.138C)

(219 words)

Author(s): Frayne, Douglas
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Sumerian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Sumerian Inscriptions Commentary A ten-line inscription found on bronze canephores, stone foundation tablets, and a door socket records Ur-Nammu’s construction of the goddess Inanna’s Eanna temple in Uruk (modern Warkāʾ). Uruk was excavated by a team of archaeologists from the Deutsche Orient-Gesellschaft, Berlin from 1912–13 and 1925–1939, and by a team from the Deutsches Archäolo…

Summary Inscription 13 (2.117G)

(532 words)

Author(s): Younger, K. Lawson, Jr.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary This inscription is engraved on a poorly preserved colossal bas-relief from Nimrud that depicts a large figure with a mace. The inscription is incised across the large figure. While a number of scholars have treated the text as a part of Tiglath-pileser’s Annals,1 others have noted its non-chronological elements as evidence of its summary type. In Tadmor’s recent treatment, he suggests that …

The Sippar Cylinder of Nabonidus (2.123A)

(3,027 words)

Author(s): Beaulieu, Paul-Alain
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary This long and complex inscription occurs in several exemplars and fragmentary duplicates, all clay cylinders inscribed in Neo-Babylonian script and found in the remains of the Ebabbar temple in Sippar. One exemplar was found in Babylon, in the so-called “palace museum,” along with many older inscriptions removed from their original contexts; it is n…

Sargon II (2.118)

(56 words)

Contributor(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Assyrian Inscriptions Commentary The Annals The Borowski Stela The Aššur “Charter” Nimrud Prisms D & E The Great “Summary” Inscription The Small “Summary” Inscription Pavement Inscription 4 The Cylinder Inscription The Nimrud Inscription The Tang-i Var Inscription Sargon II (2.118)

Nabopolassar’s Restoration of Imgur-Enlil, the Inner Defensive Wall of Babylon (2.121)

(1,717 words)

Author(s): Beaulieu, Paul-Alain
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary Nabopolassar (626–605 bce) was the founder of the Neo-Babylonian dynasty. He revolted against the Assyrians, ousted them from Akkad (i.e. Babylonia), and eventually helped the Medes to destroy the Assyrian empire. The following inscription discovered during the Iraqi restoration work on the site of Babylon and first published in 1985 commemorates Nabo…
▲   Back to top   ▲