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Nebuchadnezzar II’s Restoration of the Ebabbar Temple In Larsa (2.122A)

(650 words)

Author(s): Beaulieu, Paul-Alain
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary This inscription is recorded on several clay cylinders and baked bricks found at Larsa, all written in Neo-Babylonian script. It commemorates the rebuilding of Ebabbar, the temple of the sun god Shamash at Larsa, by Nebuchadnezzar II (605–562 bce), the son and successor of Nabopolassar and the real architect of Neo-Babylonian hegemony. Nabonidus restored Ebabbar again in his 10th regnal year (546–45 bce). He c…

Nabopolassar’s Restoration of Imgur-Enlil, the Inner Defensive Wall of Babylon (2.121)

(1,717 words)

Author(s): Beaulieu, Paul-Alain
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary Nabopolassar (626–605 bce) was the founder of the Neo-Babylonian dynasty. He revolted against the Assyrians, ousted them from Akkad (i.e. Babylonia), and eventually helped the Medes to destroy the Assyrian empire. The following inscription discovered during the Iraqi restoration work on the site of Babylon and first published in 1985 commemorates Nabo…

The Sippar Cylinder of Nabonidus (2.123A)

(3,027 words)

Author(s): Beaulieu, Paul-Alain
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary This long and complex inscription occurs in several exemplars and fragmentary duplicates, all clay cylinders inscribed in Neo-Babylonian script and found in the remains of the Ebabbar temple in Sippar. One exemplar was found in Babylon, in the so-called “palace museum,” along with many older inscriptions removed from their original contexts; it is n…

Nabonidus (2.123)

(33 words)

Contributor(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary The Sippar Cylinder of Nabonidus Nabonidus’ Rebuilding of E-lugal-galga-sisa, The Ziggurat of Ur Nabonidus (2.123)

Nabonidus’ Rebuilding of E-lugal-galga-sisa, The Ziggurat of Ur (2.123B)

(990 words)

Author(s): Beaulieu, Paul-Alain
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary This inscription, recorded on several clay cylinders found at Ur in the remains of the ziggurat, is probably the last building inscription of Nabonidus. It attests to the intensity of the king’s personal devotion to the moon god Sîn, and to his attempt to impose him as supreme deity of the Neo-Babylonian empire. Sîn is praised as “king/lord of the…

Nebuchadnezzar II’s Restoration of E-urimin-anika, The Ziggurat of Borsippa (2.122B)

(831 words)

Author(s): Beaulieu, Paul-Alain
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary This inscription is recorded on clay cylinders found in the ruins of the ziggurat of Borsippa. Duplicates are known in both Neo-Babylonian and archaizing scripts. Like the preceding, this inscription follows the standard Neo-Babylonian pattern, but the īnu clause has been expanded to include a review of the previous building works of Nebuchadnezzar…

Nebuchadnezzar II (2.122)

(40 words)

Contributor(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Neo-Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary Nebuchadnezzar II’s Restoration of the Ebabbar Temple In Larsa Nebuchadnezzar II’s Restoration of E-urimin-anika, The Ziggurat of Borsippa Nebuchadnezzar II (2.122)