Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Bremmer, Jan N." ) OR dc_contributor:( "Bremmer, Jan N." )' returned 58 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Triptolemus

(463 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (Τριπτόλεμος; Triptólemos). The paradigmatic mythological representative of Eleusis [1]. The etymology of the name is dubious [1]. T.'s genealogy is transmitted in various versions, which may indicate that he is not a long-established figure. His connection to the royal Eleusinian family (Apollod. 1,29f.) may be old. In any case, he was claimed by Argos [II 1] after the mid 5th cent. BC (Paus. 1,14,2; [2.158f.]). Around 530 BC, Athenian vases depict him as a bearded figure in a rus…

Leucothea

(247 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (Λευκοθέα; Leukothéa). A deity connected with initiation and rites of reversal. She appears as early as in Homer (Od. 5,333f.) where she is combined with Ino. Both, however, also appear independently in myth and in cult (the Leukathea of L.). L. was worshipped ‘in all of Greece’ (Cic. Nat. D. 3,39), but it is difficult to gain a clear impression of her festivals which often seem to have contained traits of social dissolution [1. 179; 2. 405-407]: her sanctuary in Delos was connec…

Linus

(348 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (Λίνος; Línos) presumably is the personification of the ritual (Oriental?) cry aílinon (Phoenician ai lanu?), the refrain of the so-called L. song (Hom. Il. 18,569-570; Hes. fr. 305-306 M.-W.; Pind. fr. 128c 6). According to this tradition, L. is the son of Apollo and a Muse (Urania, Calliope, Terpsichore or Euterpe [1. 14; 2. 55]); the link with the Muses is reflected in a cult on the Helicon [1] (Paus. 9,29,5-6) and in Epidaurus (SEG 33, 303; 44, 332A). Argive women and maidens in an annual…

Titans

(798 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (Τιτάν/ Titán, pl. Τιτάνες/ Titánes; Lat. Titan(us), pl. Titanes; the name is possibly of North-Syrian origin [1. 20428]). For the Greeks, the 'ancient gods' par excellence who, after their rebellion against Zeus, were banished into the Tartarus (cf. recently the 'subterranean T.' in a Sicilian defixio : SEG 47, 1442). The earliest sources: Hom. Il. 5,898; 8,478 f., etc., Hes. Theog. 617-719 and the lost ' Titanomachy' [2]. Hesiod (Theog. 133-137) and Acusilaus (FGrH 2 F 7) record Oceanus, Coeus, Hyperion, Crius [1], Iapetus…

Lityerses

(213 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (Λιτυέρσης; Lityérsēs). Personification of a harvest song (Men. Karchedonios fr. 230 Koerte; Apollodorus FGrH 244 F 149; Phot. λ 263-264 Theodoridis) and a flute melody (Suda s.v.). The melody, probably a dirge-like one, gave rise to a story in which L., the bastard son of the Phrygian king Midas, would force passing strangers into a reaping contest with him. If they lost, he would give them a thrashing (Poll. 4,54) or cut off their heads and tie their bodies up in the wheat sheav…

Thargelia

(230 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (θαργήλια/ Thargḗlia, also Targelia). The main festival connected with Apollo on the 6th and 7th days (resp. birthday of Artemis and Apollo) of the Attic/Ionian month Thargēliṓn (late April to late May). The etymology is not known; in Antiquity the name was linked with a stew, thárgēlos (e.g. Phot. ψ 22), made from first fruits offered up to the god. The importance of the festival is also shown in its onomastic productivity, cf. e.g. the Milesian courtesan T. (Hippias FGrH 6 F 3); indeed the festival was generally of great si…

Thalysia

(132 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (Θαλύσια/ Thalýsia), a word suggestive of 'abundance' (Gr. thalía, cf. thállō 'to bloom'), is a first-fruit sacrifice (Gr. aparchaí) for Artemis (Hom. Il. 9,534). Its antiquity is suggested by the name Thalysiades (Hom. Il. 4,458). Later it became particularly identified with Demeter; Theocritus situates his seventh Idyl on the day of a T. for Demeter. There also was a ‘thalysian’ bread, made from the first fruits (Athen. 3.114A), comparable to the thargēlos bread (Thargelia). Menander (Rhetor 391 Russell-Wilson) compares aparchaí in speeches with T. for Dem…

Hymenaios

(465 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
(Ὑμέναιος; Hyménaios). God of marriage ceremonies or a wedding song (Sappho: ὑμήναος; hymḗnaos, Callimachus: ὑμήναιος; hymḗnaios). [German version] [1] Greek god of weddings Greek god of weddings whose name derives from the Greek word for wedding hymn, hyménaios. The etymology is unclear. H. is a relatively late creation: he first appears as a personification of the wedding hymn in Pindar (fr. 128c) and Euripides (Tro. 310; 314). In the innovative choral lyrics of the 4th cent. BC, he appears to have been a favoured motif [1. 56]. …

Hades

(923 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (ᾍδης; Háidēs). Greek term for the Underworld and its ruler. Various spellings are attested: Aides, Ais and Aedoneus in Homer, H. (aspirated) only in Attica. The etymology is unclear; the most recent proposal is that H. should be traced back to *a-wid ‘invisible’ [1. 575f.], cf. however [2. 302]. Outside Attica, for instance in Homer (Il. 23,244; Od. 11,623), the word can also designate the  Underworld, whose gates are guarded by the hell-hound  Cerberus (Il. 5,646; 8,368). In Home…

Harpies

(242 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (Ἅρπυιαι; Hárpyiai, Latin Harpyiae). Female monsters of Greek mythology who, as daughters of Thaumas and Electra (Apollod. 1,2,6), belong to an older generation of gods. These ‘snatchers’ (< ἁρπάζω, harpázō = ‘snatch’, ‘rob’), who are never described in detail, are personifications of the demonic forces of storms and are always represented as winged women. Homer uses them in order to explain the disappearance without a trace of Odysseus (Hom. Od. 1,241; 14,371) or the sudden death of  Pandareus' daughters (Od…

Mopsus

(269 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (Μόψος/ Mópsos). Famous mythological seer (or seers?), who already participates in the expedition of the Argonauts in archaic Greek epic (POxy. 53,3698) and Pindar (Pyth. 189-192). He is the son of Ampyx and grandson of Ares (Hes. Sc. 181), comes from Titaresus (i.e. Dodona) and dies on the journey, after being bitten by a serpent in Libya (Apoll. Rhod. 4,1502ff.). Originally, he may well have been the heros eponymos of the Thessalian Mopsium (Str. 9,5,22). The exact relationship between this M. and the famous seer from Asia Minor, who is the son …

Cassandra

(622 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (Κασσάνδρα, Kassándra, ‘who stands out among men’ [1. 54-57]; Lat. Cassandra). In the Iliad ‘the most beautiful daughter’ of Priamus (Hom. Il. 13,366-67), who ‘compares to the golden Aphrodite’ (ibid. 24,699); Ibycus describes her as ‘she of the narrow ankles’ (fr. S 151 Davies). Beauty, youth and social status as a princess make her the paradigmatic feminine adolescent. The attempted rape on the part of  Ajax [2] fits this scenario; afterwards C. sought asylum at a stature of Athena in her sanctuary, as is reported already in the Iliupersis and in Alcaeus (S 262 Pa…

Amalthea

(336 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
(Ἀμάλθεια; Amáltheia). [German version] [1] Cretan Nymph Cretan nymph, daughter of Haemonius, by whose goat Zeus was suckled after his birth (Call. h. 1,49). Rationalizing versions make the nymph a goat (Aix). Zeus used the skin of the goat, the aigis, to conquer the titans (Hom. Il. 15,229 schol. D = POxy. 3003). Ovid (Fast. 5,111-28) connected the myth with another, presumably independent, tradition of a (bull-) cornucopia of the nymph A. (Pherecyd. FGrH 3 F 42), which was often mentioned in comedies (Aristoph. fr. 707; Cratinus fr.…

Pharmakos

(419 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] [1] Magician, v. Magic (φάρμακος; phármakos). Magician, v. Magic. Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) [German version] [2] Human 'scapegoat' (φαρμακός/ pharmakós from φάρμακον/ phármakon, 'remedy, medicine'). The pharmakos was a human 'scapegoat' (Scapegoat rituals), who at Athens and in the Ionian poleis was driven out of a city to 'purify' it during the Thargelia as well as in times of crisis such as epidemic and famine. The scapegoat was chosen from among the poor and deformed; pharmakos and associated terms were thus regarded as insults [7; 8]. The pharmakoí received pr…

Nereus

(482 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (Νηρεύς; N ēreús), whose name may be related to the Lithuanian nérti (‘to dive’), has only a shadowy role in Greek mythology. He is a typical ‘Old Man of the Sea’. This category of deities is usually anonymous in Homer (Il. 1.358, 18.141 etc.), although the title also refers to other sea-deities like Proteus (Od. 4.365) and Phorcys (Od. 13.96). These, and comparable deities like Glaucus [1], Thetis and Triton, possess the gift of prophecy and the ability to change shapes. The background is a…

Zalmoxis

(338 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (Ζάλμοξις; Zálmoxis). God of the  Getae; the name of the king Zalmodegicus (SEG 18,288) of the Getae shows that the spellings Zalmoxis and Salmoxis (Σάλμοξις) are variants [1]. Z.' epithet was probably Beléïzis (Hdt. 4,94,1: thus recent editions against earlier Gebeléïzis). The main source is Hdt. 4,94-97, which is largely if not exclusively followed by Hellanicus FGrH 4 F 73 [2. 156 note 202], which tells that among the Getae Z. was considered to be a god who taught religious rite…

Proetids

(372 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[German version] (Προιτίδες; Proitídes). The P. ('daughters of Proetus') are the subject of a mythical tradition, that narrates their maddened wandering and the subsequent curing of that madness. Several versions of the tale exist. According to most of them, the P. are driven mad by Hera after they have mocked her or her temple, or have stolen ornaments from her statue. Hes. fr. 131 M.-W. says that Dionysus drives them mad because they rejected his rites. They leave Argos or Argive Tiryns and, beli…

Perpetua und Felicitas

(143 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N.
[English Version] waren zwei junge Christinnen aus Thurburbo Minus in der Nähe von Karthago, die am 7.3.203 den Märtyrertod starben. P.s Gefängnistagebuch, das ihr Verhör und vier Visionen beschreibt, wurde wenig später zus. mit einer Vision von P.s Lehrer Saturus sowie einem Bericht über das Martyrum von P., F. und ihrer Gruppe von einem anonymen Hg. veröff. P.s Visionen ermöglichen einen authentischen Einblick in ihr Familienleben, ihr Verhör, den tiefen Eindruck ihres ersten Abendmahls und die Kraft ihres Glaubens, der ihr ermöglichte, dem Märtyrertod entgegenzusehen. Jan N. …

Proitides

(367 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[English version] (Προιτίδες). Die P. (= “Töchter des Proitos”) sind der Gegenstand einer myth. Trad., welche von ihrem Umherirren im Wahnsinn und der folgenden Heilung erzählt. Es gibt verschiedene Versionen; den meisten zufolge werden die P. von Hera in Wahn versetzt, nachdem sie entweder sie selbst oder ihren Tempel verhöhnt oder auch Schmuckstücke von ihrer Statue gestohlen haben. Nach Hes. fr. 131 M.-W. ist Dionysos für ihren Wahnsinn verantwortlich, da sie seine Riten ablehnten. Sie verlasse…

Lityerses

(193 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[English version] (Λιτυέρσης). Personifikation eines Ernteliedes (Men. Karchedonios fr. 230 Koerte; Apollodoros FGrH 244 F 149; Phot. λ 263-264 Theodoridis) und einer Flötenmelodie (Suda s.v.). Seine wohl traurige Melodie war Anlaß zu einer Gesch., nach der L., der uneheliche Sohn des phryg. Königs Midas, Durchreisende zwang, mit ihm um die Wette zu ernten. Verloren sie, peitschte er sie aus (Poll. 4,54) oder schnitt ihre Köpfe ab und band ihre Leiber in Getreidegarben. Er wurde von Herakles getöt…

Amaltheia

(321 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
(Ἀμάλθεια). [English version] [1] kret. Nymphe Kret. Nymphe, Tochter des Haemonius, von deren Ziege Zeus nach seiner Geburt gesäugt wurde (Kall. h. 1,49). Rationalisierende Versionen machten aus der Nymphe eine Ziege (Aix). Zeus gebrauchte die Haut der Ziege, die aigis, um die Titanen zu besiegen (Hom. Il. 15,229 schol. D = POxy. 3003). Ovid (fast. 5,111-28) verband den Mythos mit einer anderen, vermutlich unabhängigen Überlieferung eines (Stier-) Füllhorns der Nymphe A. (Pherekyd. FGrH 3 F 42), das oft in der Komödie erwähnt wurde (…

Linos

(310 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[English version] (Λίνος) ist wohl die Personifikation des rituellen (oriental.?) Rufs aílinon (phöniz. ai lanu?), des Refrains des sog. L.-Liedes (Hom. Il. 18,569-570; Hes. fr. 305-306 M.-W.; Pind. fr. 128c 6). Danach ist L. Sohn des Apollon und einer Muse (Urania, Kalliope, Terpsichore oder Euterpe [1. 14; 2. 55]); die Verbindung mit den Musen spiegelt sich in einem Kult auf dem Helikon [1] (Paus. 9,29,5-6) und in Epidauros (SEG 33, 303; 44, 332A) wider. Argiv. Frauen und Mädchen betrauerten in jährlichen F…

Mopsos

(262 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[English version] (Μόψος). Berühmte myth. Sehergestalt(en), die bereits im archa. griech. Epos (POxy. 53,3698) und bei Pindar (P. 189-192) am Argonautenzug (Argonautai) teilnahm(en). M. ist der Sohn von Ampys und Enkel des Ares (Hes. scut. 181), stammt aus Titaresos (d.h. Dodona) und stirbt auf der Reise, als er in Libyen von einer Schlange gebissen wird (Apoll. Rhod. 4,1502ff.). Es ist gut möglich, daß es sich bei ihm urspr. um den eponymen Heros des thessalischen Mopsion handelt (Strab. 9,5,22).…

Pharmakos

(399 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[English version] [1] Magier, s. Magie (φάρμακος). Magier, s. Magie. Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) [English version] [2] Menschlicher ›Sündenbock‹ (φαρμακός von φάρμακον, “Hilfs- bzw Heilmittel”). Der ph. war ein menschlicher “Sündenbock” (Sündenbockrituale), den man in Athen und den ionischen Poleis während der Thargelia, aber auch in Krisenzeiten wie Seuchen und Hungersnöten zur “Reinigung” aus der Stadt trieb. Der Sündenbock wurde unter den Armen und Häßlichen ausgewählt; daher galten ph. und verwandte Begriffe als Beleidigung [7; 8]. Die pharmakoí erhielten im Prytanei…

Hades

(872 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[English version] (ᾍδης). Griech. Bezeichnung für die Unterwelt und deren Herrscher. Verschiedene Schreibweisen sind belegt: Aides, Ais und Aidoneus bei Homer, H. (aspiriert) nur in Attika. Die Etym. ist unklar; der neueste Vorschlag ist, H. auf *a-wid “unsichtbar” zurückzuführen [1. 575f.], vgl. aber [2. 302]. Außerhalb von Attika, etwa bei Homer (Il. 23,244; Od. 11,623), kann das Wort auch die Unterwelt bezeichnen, deren Tore vom Höllenhund Kerberos bewacht werden (Il. 5,646; 8,368). Bei Homer l…

Harpyien

(230 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[English version] (Ἅρπυιαι, lat. Harpyiae). Weibl. Ungeheuer der griech. Myth., die als Töchter von Thaumas und Elektra (Apollod. 1,2,6) einer älteren Generation von Göttern angehören. Diese “Greifer” (< ἁρπάζω, harpázō = “packen”, “rauben”), die nirgendwo detailliert beschrieben werden, sind Personifikationen der dämonischen Kräfte von Stürmen und werden immer als geflügelte Frauen dargestellt. Homer verwendet sie, um das spurlose Verschwinden des Odysseus (Hom. Od. 1,241; 14,371) oder den plötzlichen Tod der Töchter des P…

Nereus

(469 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[English version] (Νηρεύς), dessen Name mit dem litauischen nérti (“tauchen”) zu verbinden sein mag, spielt in der griech. Myth. nur eine schattenhafte Rolle. Er ist ein typischer “Meergreis”. Diese Kategorie von Gottheiten ist bei Homer üblicherweise anonym (Hom. Il. 1,358; 18,141 u.ö.), doch trifft sie auch auf andere Meeresgötter wie Proteus (Hom. Od. 4,365) und Phorkys (Hom. Od. 13,96) zu. Diese und vergleichbare Gottheiten (wie Glaukos [1], Thetis und Triton) haben die Gabe der Prophetie sowie die …

Leukothea

(235 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[English version] (Λευκοθέα). Eine mit Initiation und Umkehrriten verbundene Gottheit. Sie kommt schon bei Homer (Od. 5,333f.) vor, wo eine Überblendung mit Ino vorliegt. Beide treten aber in Mythos und Kult (Leukathea der L.) auch unabhängig voneinander auf. L. wurde ‘in ganz Griechenland verehrt’ (Cic. nat. deor. 3,39), doch ist es schwierig, eine deutliche Vorstellung von ihren Festen zu gewinnen, die oft Züge der Auflösung der sozialen Ordnung zeigen [1. 179; 2. 405-407]: Ihr Heiligtum in Delo…

Kassandra

(586 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
[English version] (Κασσάνδρα, “die unter den Männern hervorragt” [1. 54-57]; lat. Cassandra). In der Ilias ‘die schönste Tochter’ des Priamos (Hom. Il. 13,366-67), die ‘der goldenen Aphrodite gleicht’ (ebd. 24,699); Ibykos bezeichnet sie als ‘die mit den schmalen Fesseln’ (fr. S 151 Davies). Schönheit, Jugend und gesellschaftlicher Status als Prinzessin machen sie zur paradigmatischen weibl. Adoleszenten. Dazu paßt der Vergewaltigungsversuch des Aias [2], nachdem K. bei einem Bildnis der Athena in deren Heiligtum Zuflucht gesucht hatte, was schon in der Iliupersis und bei …

Perpetua and Felicitas

(140 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N.
[German Version] were two young Christian women from Thuburbo near Carthage, who were martyred on Mar 7, 203. Perpetua’s prison diary, which describes her interrogation and four visions, was edited a short time later by an anonymous editor, together with a vision of her teacher Saturus and the report of the martyrdom of Perpetua, Felicitas, and their group. Perpetua’s visions give us a unique insight into her family life, her interrogation, the deep impression the first Eucharist made upon her, and the strength of faith that enabled her to face martyrdom. Jan N. Bremmer Bibliography BHL 6…

Philyra

(206 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Käppel, Lutz (Kiel)
(Φιλύρα/Philýra, literally 'lime-tree'). [German version] [1] Oceanid Oceanid, already in Hesiod (Theog. 1002) the mother of the centaur Chiron, in whose cave she lived according to Pindar (N. 3,43). The Hesiodic, Aeolic spelling Phillyrídēs for Chiron points to an archaic stratum of the myth (West on Hes. Theog. 1002). She was loved by Kronos who, being surprised by Rhea while making love to her, turned himself and P. into horses. Their child was the centaur Chiron, whose monstrous shape so horrified the mother that she prayed…

Poseidon

(2,631 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen)
(Ποσειδῶν/ Poseidôn, Doric Ποτειδάν/ Poteidán, along with other forms of the name). I. Myth and cult [German version] A. General remarks P. was the Greek "god of the sea, of earthquakes and of horses" (Paus. 7,21,7). He belongs to the older strata of Greek religion: his name is already well attested in Mycenaean times. He was worshipped both in Knossos and in Pylus [2], where he also had a sanctuary (the Posidaion), a cult association (the Posidaiewes) and probably even a wife, Posidaeja [1. 181-185]; his local importance is still reflected in Pylian Nestor's [1] sacrifice to…

Snake

(2,561 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian (Hamburg) | Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen)
Ὁ ὄφις/ ho óphis, as early as Hom. Il. 12,208; Latin anguis or, from its creeping way of moving, serpens; sometimes also generally ὁ δράκων/ ho drákōn (v.i. B. 3.; = óphis in Hom. Il. 12,202; Hes. Theog. 322 and 825), ἡ ἔχιδνα/ échidna (Hdt. 3,108; also as the snake-like monster Echidna and in a metaphorical sense for 'traitor/traitress', e.g. Aesch. Cho.  249), ἡ χέρσυδρος/ hē chérsydros (e.g. Nic. Ther. 359); Latin vipera (first at Cic. Har. resp. 50), coluber, colubra (from Plautus to Petronius only poetic). I. Zoology [German version] A. General The absence of snakes on certain i…

Poseidon

(2,454 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen)
(Ποσειδῶν, dor. Ποτειδάν, neben weiteren Namenformen). I. Mythos und Kult [English version] A. Allgemeines P. war der griech. “Gott des Meeres, der Erdbeben und der Pferde” (Paus. 7,21,7). Er gehört in die älteren Schichten der griech. Rel., da sein Name schon in myk. Zeit bezeugt ist: Verehrt wurde P. sowohl in Knosos als auch in Pylos [2], wo er auch ein Heiligtum (das Posidaion), eine Kultvereinigung (die Posidaiewes) und wahrscheinlich sogar eine Gattin, “Frau P.” ( Posidaeja) hatte [1. 181-185]; seine lokale Bed. spiegelt sich noch in dem Opfer wider, das der Pylie…

Thargelia

(207 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N.; Ü:SU.FI.
[English version] (θαργήλια, auch Targelia). Das mit Apollon verbundene Hauptfest am 6./7. (Geburtstag von Artemis bzw. Apollon) des attisch-ionischen Monats Thargeliṓn (später April bis später Mai). Die Etym. ist unbekannt; in der Ant. wurde der Name mit einem Eintopfgericht verbunden, dem thárgēlos (z. B. Phot. ψ 22), der aus den dem Gott geopferten Erstlingsfrüchten bestand. Die Wichtigkeit des Festes zeigt sich auch in seiner onomastischen Produktivität (vgl. z. B. die milesische Kurtisane Th.: Hippias FGrH 6 F 3; überhaupt war das…

Triptolemos

(440 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N.; Ü:SU.FI.
[English version] (Τριπτόλεμος). Myth. Vertreter von Eleusis [1] par excellence. Die Etym. des Namens ist zweifelhaft [1]. T.' Genealogie ist in unterschiedlichen Varianten überl., was darauf hinweisen könnte, daß es sich nicht um eine altetablierte Gestalt handelt. Alt ist möglicherweise seine Verbindung zur eleusinischen königlichen Familie (Apollod. 1,29 f.), nach der Mitte des 5. Jh. v. Chr. wurde er allerdings von Argos [II 1] in Anspruch genommen (Paus. 1,14,2; [2. 158 f.]). Um 530 v. Chr. z…

Hymenaios

(1,252 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Robbins, Emmet (Toronto)
(ὑμέναιος). Hochzeitsgott oder Hochzeitslied (Sappho: ὐμήναος, Kallimachos: ὑμήναιος). [English version] [1] griech. Gott der Hochzeit Griech. Gott der Hochzeit, dessen Name vom griech. Wort für Hochzeitslied, hyménaios, stammt. Die Etym. ist unklar. H. ist eine relativ späte Schöpfung: Erstmals taucht er als eine Personifikation des Hochzeitsliedes bei Pindar (fr. 128c) und Euripides (Tro. 310; 314) auf. In der innovativen Chorlyrik des 4. Jh. v.Chr. scheint er ein Lieblingsthema gewesen zu sein [1. 56], dennoch wird er…

Titanen

(740 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N.; Ü:B.ST.
[English version] (Τιτάν, Pl. Τιτάνες; lat. Titan(us), Pl. Titanes; Name ist vielleicht nordsyr. Ursprungs [1. 20428]). Für die Griechen die “alten Götter” par excellence, die nach ihrem Aufstand gegen Zeus in den Tartaros verbannt werden (vgl. neuerdings die “unterirdischen T.” in einer sizilischen defixio : SEG 47, 1442). Früheste Quellen: Hom. Il. 5,898; 8,478 f. u. a., Hes. theog. 617-719 und die verlorene ‘Titanomachie [2]. Hesiod (theog. 133-137) und Akusilaos (FGrH 2 F 7) verzeichnen als männliche T. Okeanos, Ko…

Thalysia

(128 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N.; Ü:SU.FI.
[English version] (Θαλύσια) hat die Konnotation von “Überfluß” und bezeichnet ein griech. Opfer von Erstlingsfrüchten ( aparchaí) für Artemis (so Hom. Il. 9,534). Ein Hinweis auf sein beträchtliches Alter ist der Name Thalysiádēs (Hom. Il. 4,458). Später standen die th. bes. mit Demeter in Verbindung (Theokr. Eidyllion 7 spielt am Tag der th.). Es gab auch ein “thalysisches” Brot, welches aus den Erstlingsfrüchten hergestellt wurde (Athen. 3,114a), vergleichbar dem thárgēlos-Brot ( thargḗlia ). Menandros [12] Rhetor (p. 391 Russell-Wilson) zieht eine Parallele zw. “ aparchaí vo…

Philyra

(207 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Käppel, Lutz (Kiel)
(Φιλύρα, wörtl. “Lindenbaum”). [English version] [1] Okeanide Okeanide, bereits bei Hesiod (theog. 1002) die Mutter des Kentauren Chiron, in dessen Höhle sie laut Pindar (N. 3,43) lebt. Die hesiodeische, aiolische Schreibung Phillyrídēs für Chiron verweist auf eine archa. Schicht des Mythos (West zu Hes. theog. 1002). Mit ihr vereinigt sich Kronos, der sich selbst und Ph. in Pferde verwandelt, als er während des Liebesaktes von Rhea überrascht wird. Ihr Kind ist der Kentaur Chiron, dessen monströse Gestalt die Mutter so schoc…

Zalmoxis

(328 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N.; Ü:S.ZU.
[English version] (Ζάλμοξις). Gott der Getai; der Name des getischen Königs Zalmodegikos (SEG 18,288) zeigt, daß die Schreibweisen Zalmoxis und Salmoxis (Σάλμοξις) Varianten sind [1]. Epitheton des Z. war wahrscheinlich Beléïzis (Hdt. 4,94,1: so neuere Ausgaben im Gegensatz zu der früheren Lesung Gebeléïzis). Hauptquelle ist Hdt. 4,94-97, ihm folgt weitgehend, wenn auch nicht ausschließlich, Hellanikos FGrH 4 F 73 [2. 156 Anm. 202], der berichtet, daß Z. unter den Geten als ein Gott galt, der rel.…

Helenos

(547 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Ameling, Walter (Jena)
(Ἕλενος). [English version] [1] einer der frühen großen Seher Einer der frühen großen Seher, im ep. Kyklos wichtiger als bei Homer; Sohn des Priamos und der Hekabe (Hom. Il. 6,76; 7,44; Soph. Phil. 605f.; Apollod. 3,151; POxy. 56,3829), Zwillingsbruder der Kassandra (Antikleides FGrH 140 F 17; POxy. 56,3830). Einer wahrscheinlich archa. Trad. nach erhält H. bereits als Kind seine Sehergabe im Tempel des Apollon Thymbraios, wo er und Kassandra eingeschlafen sind. Als die Eltern am nächsten Morgen zurückko…

Narkissos

(740 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen)
(Νάρκισσος, lat. Narcissus). [English version] I. Mythologie Die Personifikation einer gleichnamigen Pflanze mit - wie bei vielen Pflanzen - möglicherweise vorgriech. Etym. (Chantraine, Bd. 2, s.v.). Der aitiologische Mythos des N. ist nur in relativ späten Quellen belegt und kaum älter als hellenistisch. Konon [4] (FGrH 26 F 1,26), ein Mythograph mit Kenntnis zahlreicher lokaler Mythen, berichtet über das Geschick eines gutaussehenden Jünglings aus dem boiotischen Thespiai, der alle männlichen Annäher…

Gorgo

(604 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)
[German version] [1] Horrific monster Female monster in Greek mythology. According to the canonical version of the myth (Apollod. 2,4,1-2),  Perseus must get the head of  Medusa, the mortal sister of Sthenno and Euryale (Hes. Theog. 276f.; POxy. 61, 4099), the daughters of Phorcys and Ceto (cf. Aeschylus' drama Phorcides, TrGF 262). The three sisters live on the island of Sarpedon in the ocean (Cypria, fr. 23; Pherecydes FGrH 3 F 11), although Pindar (Pyth. 10,44-48) located them among the Hyperboraeans ( Hyperborei). Their connection to the s…

Helenus

(636 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Ameling, Walter (Jena) | Strothmann, Meret (Bochum)
(Ἕλενος; Hélenos). [German version] [1] One of the great early seers One of the great early seers, more important in the epic kyklos than in Homer; son of  Priamus and  Hecabe (Hom. Il. 6,76; 7,44; Soph. Phil. 605f.; Apollod. 3,151; P Oxy. 56,3829), twin brother of  Cassandra (Anticlides FGrH 140 F 17; P Oxy. 56,3830). According to a probably archaic tradition, H. received his gift of prophecy when he was still a child in the temple of Apollo Thymbraeus, where he and Cassandra had fallen asleep. When their parents re…

Narcissus

(1,201 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
[German version] I. Mythical character (Νάρκισσος/ Nárkissos, Lat. Narcissus). [German version] A. Mythology Narcissus is the personification of a plant by the same name; as with many plants, the etymology may be pre-Greek (Chantraine, vol. 2, s.v.). The aetiological myth of Narcissus is documented only in relatively late sources and is unlikely to be earlier than Hellenistic. Conon [4] (FGrH 26 F 1,26), a mythographer, who knew many local myths, tells of the fate of a handsome youth from Thespiae in Boeotia…

Schlange

(2,395 words)

Author(s): Hünemörder, Christian | Bremmer, Jan N.; Ü:S.KR.
Ὁ ὄφις/ óphis, bereits bei Hom. Il. 12,208; lat. anguis oder aufgrund der kriechenden Bewegungsweise serpens; manchmal auch allg. ὁ δράκων/ drákōn (s.u. B. 3.; = óphis bei Hom. Il. 12,202; Hes. theog. 322 und 825), ἡ ἔχιδνα/ échidna (Hdt. 3,108; auch als schlangenartiges Ungeheuer Echidna und in übertragenem Sinne für “Verräter/in”, z. B. Aischyl. Choeph. 249), ἡ χέρσυδρος/ chérsydros (z. B. Nik. Ther. 359); lat. vipera (seit Cic. har. resp. 50), coluber, colubra (von Plautus bis Petronius nur poetisch). I. Zoologie [English version] A. Allgemein Das Fehlen von Sch. auf bestimm…

Aiolos

(490 words)

Author(s): Scheer, Tanja (Rom) | Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Graf, Fritz (Princeton)
(Αἴολος). [English version] [1] Eponym des Aiolerstamms Eponym des Aiolerstamms. Sohn des Hellen (Hes. fr. 9 MW), Enkel des Deukalion, dessen vielfache genealogische Verbindungen das myth. Weltbild der Griechen auch geogr. gliedern helfen. Seine Brüder Doros und Xythos wandern aus, A. ist König im väterlichen Magnesia/Thessalien. Durch Enarete, Tochter des Deimachos, hat er zahlreiche Kinder: Die Söhne Kretheus, Athamas, Sisyphos, Salmoneus und Perieres (Hes. fr. 10 MW, bei Apollod. 1,51 außerdem Deïon…

Gorgo

(563 words)

Author(s): Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum)
[English version] [1] Häßliches Ungeheuer Weibliches Ungeheuer der griech. Myth. Gemäß der kanonischen Fassung des Mythos (Apollod. 2,4,1-2) muß Perseus den Kopf der Medusa, der sterblichen Schwester von Sthenno und Euryale (Hes. theog. 276f.; POxy. 61, 4099), der Töchter von Phorkys und Keto, holen (vgl. auch Aischylos' Drama Phorkides, TrGF 262). Die drei Schwestern leben auf der Insel Sarpedon im Ozean (Kypria, fr. 23; Pherekydes FGrH 3 F 11), nach Pindar (P. 10,44-48) jedoch bei den Hyperboräern (Hyperboreioi); ihre Verbindung mit dem Mee…

Aeolus

(508 words)

Author(s): Scheer, Tanja (Rome) | Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH)
(Αἴολος; Aíolos). [German version] [1] Eponym of the Aeolean tribe Eponym of the Aeolean tribe. Son of Hellen (Hes. fr. 9 MW), grandson of  Deucalion, whose many genealogical connections help to give structure to the mythical worldview of the Greeks, including geographically. His brothers Dorus and Xythos emigrate, A. is king in the paternal Magnesia/Thessaly. By Enarete, daughter of Deimachus, he has many children: the sons Cretheus, Athamas,  Sisyphus, Salmoneus and Perieres (Hes. fr. 10 MW; Apollod. 1,…

Prophets

(2,681 words)

Author(s): Köckert, Matthias (Berlin) | Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Wick, Peter (Basle) | Toral-Niehoff, Isabel (Freiburg)
[German version] I. Introduction The term P. has found its way as a loanword from the Greek translation of the Bible into numerous languages. The Septuagint regularly uses prophḗtēs to translate the Hebrew substantive nābī, which is etymologically connected with Akkadian nabû(m) = 'one who is called'. Since then a very much wider use has emerged. For a more precise demarcation of the concept, it is useful to adopt Cicero's distinction between inductive and intuitive divination ( genus artificiosum, genus naturale: Cic. Div. 1,11,34; 2,26 f.) and to describe as prophets onl…

Prophet

(2,453 words)

Author(s): Köckert, Matthias (Berlin) | Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Bremmer, Jan N. (Groningen) | Wick, Peter (Basel) | Toral-Niehoff, Isabel (Freiburg)
[English version] I. Einleitung Der Begriff P. hat als Fremdwort über die griech. Bibelübersetzung Eingang in zahlreiche Sprachen gefunden. Die Septuaginta übersetzt mit prophḗtēs in der Regel das hebr. Subst. nābī, das etym. mit akkadisch nabû(m) = “Berufener” zusammenhängt. Seither hat sich ein sehr viel weiterer Gebrauch durchgesetzt. Zur Präzisierung bietet es sich an, Ciceros Unterscheidung zw. induktiver und intuitiver Mantik aufzunehmen ( genus artificiosum, genus naturale: Cic. div. 1,11,34; 2,26 f.) und nur die Vertreter der letzteren als P. zu bezei…

Divination

(6,021 words)

Author(s): Maul, Stefan (Heidelberg) | Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) | Haas, Volkert (Berlin) | Niehr, Herbert (Tübingen) | Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel) | Et al.
[German version] I. Mesopotamia While attention in old Egyptian culture was largely centred on existence after death, the concerns of Mesopotamia were almost exclusively with the present. A significant part of the cultural energy of ancient Mesopotamia was devoted to keeping human actions in harmony with the divine, so as to ward off such misfortunes as natural catastrophes, war, sickness and premature death. As such, heavy responsibility rested on the ruler as mediator between the world of gods and that of men. In Mesopotamia everything which is and happens was seen as a man…

Sacrifice

(10,943 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Haas, Volkert (Berlin) | Podella, Thomas (Lübeck) | Et al.
I. Religious studies [German version] A. General Sacrifice is one of the central concepts in describing ritual religion in ancient and modern cultures. In European Modernity, the term sacrifice (directly or indirectly influenced by Christian theology of the sacrificial death of Jesus Christ to redeem mankind) also has an intimation towards individual self-giving ('sacrifice of self'). The range of nuances in the modern meaning stretches to include discourses that have lost their religious motif and hav…

Opfer

(11,705 words)

Author(s): Borgeaud, Philippe | Marx, Alfred | Chaniotis, Angelos | Bremmer, Jan N. | Moscovitz, Leib | Et al.
[English Version] I. ReligionswissenschaftlichDas Wort »O.« bez. im Deutschen sowohl das geopferte Lebewesen bzw. die Opfergabe als auch diejenige rituelle Handlung (z.B. Zerstörung), durch die das Lebewesen oder Objekt den übernatürlichen Wesen zugeeignet wird. Im Engl. sowie in den romanischen Sprachen werden diese beiden Phänomene dagegen begrifflich differenziert. Engl./franz. »sacrifice« (ital./span. sacrificio) bez. die rituelle Opferhandlung, während engl. »victim« (franz. victime, span. vi…

Divination

(5,782 words)

Author(s): Maul, Stefan (Heidelberg) | Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) | Haas, Volkert (Berlin) | Niehr, Herbert (Tübingen) | Wiesehöfer, Josef (Kiel) | Et al.
[English version] I. Mesopotamien Während das Augenmerk der altägypt. Kultur in hohem Maße auf die Existenz nach dem Tode gerichtet ist, kreisen die Ängste der mesopotamischen Kulturen fast ausschließlich um Belange des Diesseits. Ein bed. Teil der kulturellen Energien des alten Mesopotamien fließt in das Bemühen, menschliches Handeln im Einklang mit dem Göttl. zu halten, um dadurch Unglück wie Naturkatastrophen, Krieg, Krankheit und vorzeitigen Tod fernzuhalten. Hierbei kommt einem Herrscher als Mittler zw. Götter- und Menschenwelt bes. Verantwortung zu. Da im Weltbild Me…

Opfer

(9,655 words)

Author(s): Bendlin, Andreas (Erfurt) | Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Quack, Joachim (Berlin) | Haas, Volkert (Berlin) | Podella, Thomas (Lübeck) | Et al.
I. Religionswissenschaftlich [English version] A. Allgemeines Das O. gehört zu den zentralen Begriffen für die Selbstbeschreibung von Ritual-Rel. in ant. und mod. Kulturen. Der O.-Begriff schließt in der europäischen Moderne oft (darin direkt oder indirekt von der christl. Theologie des die Menschen erlösenden O.-Todes Jesu Christi beinflußt) das Moment der individuellen Selbsthingabe (“Aufopferung”) ein. Die Spannbreite der mod. Bedeutungsnuancen reicht dabei bis zu den nicht mehr rel., sondern nun m…

Sacrifice

(13,083 words)

Author(s): Borgeaud, Philippe | Marx, Alfred | Chaniotis, Angelos | Bremmer, Jan N. | Moscovitz, Leib | Et al.
[German Version] I. Religious Studies The word sacrifice denotes both the living creature or offering sacrificed and the ritual action (e.g. destruction) through which that creature or object is dedicated to a supernatural being. If a distinction needs to be made, English and the Romance languages can use sacrifice (Eng. and Fr.; sacrificio Ital. and Span.) for the ritual action while using victim (Fr. victime, Span. víctima, Ital. vittima) for the creature sacrificed. Etymologically sacrifice suggests an action in which the sacrificed object is “made holy/sacred” (Lat. sacrum fac…
▲   Back to top   ▲