Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)" )' returned 373 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Via

(44 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Modern architectural term describing the ideally identical spacing between mutuli (Mutulus) - sometimes also the distance between the guttae of mutuli - on the geison in the Doric entablature of a peripteral temple (Angle triglyph problem; Column). Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)

Assembly buildings

(1,652 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] I. Definition Assembly buildings (AB) are in the following defined as any building of Greek and Roman antiquity, which within the framework of the social, political, or religious organization of a community served as the architectonically defined location for interaction and communication. However, it is not always possible to define the function of an AB unambiguously nor to assume its exclusive usage. Sometimes, buildings or parts of buildings fall under the above definition, whic…

Architect

(1,476 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] A. Etymology, term, delimitation The term architect, not documented before the 5th cent. BC, derives from the Greek ἀρχιτέκτων ( architéktōn; Hdt. 3.60; 4.87); in turn, this term is derived from τέκτων ( téktōn); τεκτωσύνη ( tektosýnē; carpentry), which shows that the architect of early archaic times initially dealt with  wood and only later came in contact with stone as a building material. The Latin arc(h)itectus is a loan word from this Greek semantic field. An architect is associated with practical tasks carried out by tradesmen in the cont…

Dome, Construction of domes

(844 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] ‘Non-genuine’ dome constructions from layered corbel stone vaults ( Vaults and arches, construction of) are to be found throughout Mediterranean cultures from the 3rd millennium BC; they seem to have entered largely independently the architectural repertory of Minoan Crete (tholos graves at Mesara and Knossos), Mycenaean Greece (‘Treasure-house’ of Atreus in Mycenae; ‘domed grave’ at Orchomenus), Sardinia ( nuraghe), Thrace and Scythia (so-called ‘beehive’-domes on graves and also Etruria (domed grave at Populonia). This form is mostly …

Opaeum

(83 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (ὀπαῖον, opaîon). The opening in the roof or dome in the architecture of antiquity; an important element of lighting in ancient buildings. Rare in Greek architecture ('lantern' of the Lysicrates monument in Athens; Telesterion of Eleusis), but common in Roman dome building. Dome, Construction of Domes; Roofing Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography W.D. Heilmeyer (ed.), Licht und Architektur, 1990  C. Spuler, Opaion und Laterne. Zur Frage der Beleuchtung antiker und frühchristlicher Bauten durch ein Opaion und zur Entstehung der Kuppellaterne, 1973.

Aule

(236 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (αὐλή; aulḗ) In Homer (Od. 14,5) the enclosed, light courtyard of a  house. Since the 7th cent. BC, the aule is a central part of the Greek courtyard house, where the multi-room house is grouped around the aule, which can be used agriculturally, for example as stables. The development of the courtyard house marks an important point in the development of Greek house architecture; it displaces the until that time usual form of the one-room house (megaron, oval and apsidal house). The aule was usually paved; from classical times, it is present in nearly all houses…

Ustrinum

(113 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] ('crematorium'). An architectural cremation place for Roman rulers, of which often only an altar remains. The best-known example is the Ustrinum of Augustus on the Field of Mars in Rome (Campus Martius; Roma III.) near the Mausoleum Augusti; Strabo (5,3,8), describes it as lavishly built and preserved, after the act of cremation, as a monument. Remains of other ustrina on the Field of Mars are assigned to the emperors Hadrianus, Marcus Aurelius and Antoninus Pius. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography A. Danti, s. v. Arae Consecrationis, LTUR 1, 1993, 75 f.  H. …

Lacunar

(269 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Passed down in Vitruvius [1. s.v. l.], an architectural technical term, on many occasions there also designated as lacunaria (pl.), for the sunken panels that decorated the ceiling between wooden beams crossing one another ( Roofing), the Greek equivalent being phátnōma, gastḗr, kaláthōsis [2. 45-52 with additional terms for details of the lacunar]. Lacunaria were as a rule three-dimensionally recessed and decorated with paintings or reliefs (mostly ornamental). In the temple or columned building, the place where they were first app…

Incrustation

(507 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Wall decoration with a structure imitating architecture misleadingly described in Vitruvius (7,5) as stucco facing in the sense of the 1st Pompeian style ( Stucco;  Wall paintings); as an archaeological technical term incrustation (from Latin   crustae sc. marmoreae, Greek πλάκωσις/ plákōsis) in contrast describes solely the interior facing of walls of lesser material with marble slabs (however, the relationship of this ‘genuine’ incrustation to the 1st Pompeian style which imitates incrustation and therefore is frequen…

Pnyx

(127 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (πνύξ/ pnýx). Conspicious large hill built with houses in the urban area of Athens to the west of the Acropolis (Athens II. 3, Hill of the Muses). From the late 6th century BC this was the place of the people's assembly (Ekklesia). Initially they held sessions on a gently sloping piece of ground following a natural semi-circle, which was almost undeveloped; the only structure was a rostrum (βῆμα/ bêma). In the late 5th century BC the whole site was architecturally shaped and in the process turned through c. 180°. The lavishly and representatively built orchestra-sha…

Egg-and-dart moulding

(216 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Distinct  ornamentation in the decorative canon of Ionic architecture, in modern architectural terminology also known as the ‘Ionian  kymation’: a profiled ledge with an arched cross section whose relief or painted ornamentation consisted of an alternation of oval leaves and lancet-shaped spandrel tips and which often concludes at the lower end with pearl staff (astragal) corresponding to the rhythm of the egg-and-dart moulding. Apart from decorating the  epistylion or the  frieze…

Compluvium

(84 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] According to Varro (Ling. 5,161) and Vitruvius (6,3,1f.) the customary formation of the roof opening of all types of the  atrium in the Roman  house. The funnel-shaped roof surfaces of the compluvium, which slope inward, conduct rainwater into the  impluvium, a basin at the atrium's centre. In the older displuvium the roof surfaces slanted outwards. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography E. M. Evans, The Atrium Complex in the Houses of Pompeii, 1980 R. Förtsch, Arch. Komm. zu den Villenbriefen des jüngeren Plinius, 1993, 30-31.

Anathyrosis

(113 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Ancient technical term related to  building technology (IG VII 3073, 121; 142). In Greek stone block construction, anathyrosis refers to the partial removal of material from contact surfaces between two stone blocks or column sections (usually by picking). By this minimization of the contact zone between two construction elements, not visible from the outside, their fit could be improved; viewed from the outside, the joints formed a network of superfine lines. The disadvantage of the anathyrosis is an increased pressure on the reduced bearing surfaces, w…

Pseudodipteros

(123 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Architectural term recorded in Vitruvius (3,2,6; 3,8-9), used to label one of the forms of temple listed there. The pseudodipteros type was, according to Vitruvius (7 praef. 12), developed at the Temple of Artemis at Magnesia [2] on the Maeander by the architect Hermogenes [4], who omitted the inner row of columns of a dipteros. The characteristic result of this is the unusually wide ambulatory (Greek pterón) around the cella. In this sense e.g. the temple at Sardis, which also is dedicated to Artemis, is likewise considered a pseudodipteros.…

Gates; porches

(613 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Gates that went beyond purely military aspects (for these cf.  Fortifications) are to be found in Greek architecture from the 6th cent. BC onwards ─ initially as imposingly designed entrances to sanctuaries, and from about 400 BC also in secular contexts (entrances to the  Agora,  Gymnasium,  Stadium or  Assembly buildings, e.g. in Miletus, Priene, Olympia). The development and extension of the própylon as a decorative entrance gate to a  sanctuary can be reconstructed, for example, from the Acropolis of Athens (cf.  Athens II. with locati…

Ptolemaeum

(85 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Modern term for various buildings of the dynasty of the Ptolemies serving the ruler cult; the first Ptolemaeum is considered to be a building built by  Ptolemy [3] II adjacent to the tomb of  Alexander [4]  the Great (later amalgamated by Ptolemy [7] IV with Alexander's tomb into a connected mausoleum complex). There are further Ptolemaea e.g. in Athens (Gymnasion), Limyra (?) and Rhodes (Temenos). Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography J. Borchardt, Ein Ptolemaion in Limyra, in: RA 1991, 309-322  Will, vol. 1, 329.

Chersiphron

(170 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (Χερσίφρων; Chersíphrōn) from Cnossus. Father of  Metagenes; these two being the  architects of the archaic  dipteros of Artemis at Ephesus (2nd half of the 6th cent. BC), as recorded in Strabo (14,640), Vitruvius (3,2,7) and Pliny (HN 7,125; 36,95). Both of them wrote about this temple in a work which was evidently still known to Vitruvius (Vitr. De arch. 7,1,12), and is one of the earliest formulations of ancient architectural theory ( Architecture, theory of); through his develo…

Pillar, monumental

(459 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] As well as the column/monumental column, there was another possibility available for the displaying of monuments, in their placement on free-standing monumental pillars (on the incorporation of monumental pillars in buildings, cf. pilaster), a form of honouring rulers primarily found in Greece in the vicinity of sanctuaries. An early example of a pillar-mounted monument is the bronze Nike of the Messenians and Naupactians sculpted by Paeonius [1] and placed before the eastern front of the temple of Zeus at  Olympia, atop - and…

Megaron

(444 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (μέγαρον; mégaron). Architectural feature mentioned several times in the Homeric epics (e.g. Hom. Od. 2,94; 19,16; 20,6). It was evidently the main room of the palace or house with the communal hearth in the centre. On later mentions of megara. in Greek literature (esp. Hdt. 7,140f.) cf. Temple. Scholarship on the archaic period contains considerably different ideas about the understanding of the term megaron and the derivation of the corresponding building forms connected with it at different times. On the one hand, the megaro…

Saepta

(104 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] A large rectangular square, surrounded by porticoes, on the Field of Mars (Campus Martius) in Rome, on which (allegedly since the time of the mythical kings) the citizens fit to bear arms met in the context of the c omitia centuriata in order to elect the magistrates; there is evidence of a structure from the 6th cent. BC onwards. Under Caesar the square (under the name of Saepta Iulia) was remodelled with architectural splendour, just as the political and functional body of the c omitia centuriata was reduced to a pseudo-Republican relic. Assembly buildings Höcker, Christ…

Pinacotheca

(135 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (πινακοθήκη/ pinakothḗkē: Str. 14,1,14; Lat. pinacotheca). Rooms designed for collections of pictures (cf. Varro, Rust. 1,2,10; 59,2; Vitr. De arch. 6,2,5; Plin. HN 35,4,148). According to Vitruvius (6,3,8; 1,2,7; 6,4,2; 7,3) the room or rooms should be large and, in consideration of lighting requirements, face north. There is a problem with this conceptualisation: the name pinacotheca for the north wing of the Propylaea on the Acropolis in Athens is not ancient; other buildings displa…

Greek Revival

(1,791 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) [German version] A. General (CT) In architectural history the technical term Greek Revival (GR) refers to the copying and imitating of ancient Greek architectural patterns that took place in the late 18th and 19th cents. The term was coined after 1900 in the English-speaking world and usually only applies to Great Britain and the United States; there is no compelling reason, however, to exclude similar examples of Classicist architecture in other countries, especially in the …

Spelunca

(74 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Latin term for a villa or praetorium of Tiberius (Tac. Ann. 4,59,1; Suet. Tib. 39; Plin.  HN 3,59) to the east of Terracina in southern Latium. There is no agreement on whether S. is identical with the Sperlonga villa complex with its cave-like magnificent grotto. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography B. Andreae, Praetorium Speluncae, 1994  G. Hafner, Das Praetorium Spelunca bei Terracina und die Höhle bei Sperlonga, in: Rivista di Archeologia 20, 1996, 75-78.

Maenianum

(99 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Gallery above the tabernae at the Forum Romanum in Rome, named after the Roman censor M. Maenius [I 3], from where spectators could follow the gladiatorial fights. The principle, attested here for the first time, of building the edge construction of a forum in two stories and constructing it as a bleacher, resp. viewing area on the upper floor, became widespread in the 2nd and 1st cents. BC in Roman architecture ( Forum); thereafter, the tiers in the amphitheatre were known as maeniana ( Theatre). Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography W.-H. Gross, s.v. M., KlP 3, 864.

Aedicula

(140 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] In Roman culture, aedicula either refers to a cult-related shrine ( Lararium), often in a sepulchral context ( Tombs), which contained urns or pictures of the deceased, or a building structure flanked by columns for the housing of statues or paintings. In the latter case either as an individual building usually placed on a podium as high as a man or as a niche integrated into a façade arrangement. Rear and side walls are without windows, the roof with a flat slope has a gable displaying ornaments. The   naiskos is comparable in Greek culture. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibl…

Skeuotheke

(182 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (σκευοθήκη; skeuothḗkē). Epigraphically documented Ancient Greek term for a store, arsenal or hall for storing the rigging of warships (esp. IG II2 1668 for a skeuotheke in Peiraeus near Athens). Skeuothekai belong to the Greek publicly funded sphere of useful architecture, which in the 4th cent. BC acquired an increasingly representational character; existing functional buildings of wood were sometimes lavishly rebuilt in stone. Typologically the skeuotheke largely corresponds in its construction to the ship-shed ( neṓrion), which is accessed by way of …

Wonders of the world

(657 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (Greek e.g. ἑπτὰ θεάματα/ heptà theámata 'seven spectacles': Str. 14,652; 656; 16,738; 17,808, among others; Latin e.g. [ septem] miracula: Plin. HN 36,30; Mart. de spectaculis 1,1; septem opera mirabilia 'seven wondrous works': Hyg. fab. 223; septem spectacula: Vitr. De arch. 7, praef.). In antiquity, magnificent human cultural achievements that were particularly notable for their technical construction and artistic ornamentation were referred to as "wonders of the world". The term was traced back by Gell. NA 3,10,16 to Varro's lost work septem opera in orbe …

Lacus Curtius

(156 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Monument on the Forum Romanum in Rome, which already in antiquity was associated with various myths of Rome's early history ( Curtius [1]). Probably built in the Augustan period, the lacus Curtius (LC) was among the monuments on the Roman Forum that served as vivid, palpable manifestations of early Roman history and, as such, provided a means by which mythology could be given a role to play in the depiction of historical reality, which so far had been recorded primarily in the form of chronicles. The LC consist…

Mausoleum Augusti

(388 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Nach Sueton (Augustus 100,4; vgl. Strab. 5,3,8) eines der frühesten unter Augustus auf dem Campus Martius in Rom (Roma) errichteten Gebäude, wohl 28 v.Chr. unter formaler und inhaltlicher Bezugnahme auf das Maussolleion und das Grabmal Alexandros' [4] d. Gr. begonnen und um 23 v.Chr. vollendet. Das kreisrunde Bauwerk mit insgesamt 87 m Dm bestand aus einer bis h. nicht völlig geklärten Anzahl konzentrisch ineinander gefügter und mehrstöckig aufgebauter Tuffmauern, die durch s…

Praefurnium

(22 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Feuerstelle für Kalk- oder Brennöfen sowie der zentrale Heizraum bei röm. Thermenanlagen. Bäder; Heizung; Thermen Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)

Compluvium

(78 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Nach Varro (ling. 5,161) und Vitruv (6,3,1f.) übliche Ausbildung der Dachöffnung an allen Typen des Atriums am röm. Haus. Die trichterartig nach innen geneigten Dachflächen des c. leiten das Regenwasser in das Impluvium, ein Becken im Zentrum des Atrium. Beim älteren displuvium sind die Dachflächen nach außen geneigt. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography E.M. Evans, The Atrium Complex in the Houses of Pompeii, 1980  R. Förtsch, Arch. Komm. zu den Villenbriefen des jüngeren Plinius, 1993, 30-31.

Mutulus

(152 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Ant.-lat. t.t. (Varro rust. 3,5,13; Vitr. 4,1,2; 4,2,5 u.ö.) für einen Teil des Kragsteinblocks am Geison dorischer griech. Tempelgebälke. Ein griech. Analogon dieses speziellen t.t. ist unbekannt; alle einzelnen Bestandteile des Blockes wurden hier wohl insgesamt als geíson bezeichnet. Unter dem M. versteht man die überhängende Platte mit meist 3 × 6 Tropfen (Guttae), die in regelmäßiger Reihung oberhalb des Metopen-Triglyphen-Frieses erscheint und diesen in seinem Rhythmus unterstützt. Der M. entspricht in seiner Breite dem Maß einer Triglyphe ( tríglyp…

Pseudoperipteros

(90 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Bei Vitruv (4,8,6) überl. architektonischer Fachterminus, der ital.-röm. Tempel bezeichnet, deren seitliche Säulen der Vorhalle sich als der Kernmauer vorgeblendete Halbsäulen um die Cella herum fortsetzen und somit einen “unechten” Säulenkranz ohne einen wirklichen Umgang (griech. pterón) formen (Peripteros). Bekannteste Beispiele sind die Maison Carrée in Nîmes (Nemausus [2]) und der ionische Tempel am Forum Boarium in Rom. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography Ch. Balty, Ét. sur la Maison Carrée de Nîmes, 1960 (zum Typus)  R. Amy, P. Gros, La Maison…

Tector

(48 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] ( tector albarius). According to Vitr. De arch. 2,8,20 a Roman craftsman who was responsible for plastering walls, as a rule in three layers, the top layer of which could be painted or stuccoed while still moist. Construction technique; Fresco; Stucco; Wall-painting Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)

Loretum

(87 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (also Lauretum, from laureus, ‘bay-tree’). Place on the Aventine Hill in Rome ( Roma) where bay-trees grow. According to legend the burial place of Titus Tatius (Festus 496 L.). Already at the time of Varro (Varro, Ling. 5,152) the site could no longer be located with certainty. The possibility that L. was divided into two parts ( L. minor and L. maior) is a matter for discussion because of two corresponding street names in Regio XIII (cf. CIL 6,975). Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography Richardson, 234f.

Mandrocles

(87 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Architect of Samos. For a considerable fee he built the pontoon bridge over the Bosporus (Hdt. 4,87,1ff.) for Darius [1] I in 513/2 BC in the context of the campaign against the Scythians. M. attained fame through a votive offering in the Heraeum of Samos: a panel painting described in detail by Herodotus (4,88,1-89,2), which depicted the (pontoon) bridge and praised the architect in an epigram. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography H. Svenson-Evers, Die griechische Architekten archaischer und klassischer Zeit, 1996, 59-66 (with additional literature).

Crypta, Cryptoporticus

(212 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] From the Greek κρυπτή ( kryptḗ); in the description of the Nile barge of Ptolemy IV, transmitted in Athenaeus 5, 205a, it designated a closed walkway lit by windows. In Lat. texts cryptoporticus could cover various items of architecture such as cellars (Vitr. De arch. 6, 8), vaults (Juv. 5, 106) or even subterranean, vaulted cult or grave structures. In modern archaeological terminology the term cryptoporticus is used synonymously with crypta; this compound word from crypta and   porticus that comes to us only from Pliny (Ep. 2,17,20; 5,6…

Spira

(158 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] The cylinder, in some cases lavishly sculpted and sometimes decorated with a double trochilus and convex and concave sections, that forms the 'middle layer' of a conventional old-Ionic column base (Samos, Heraion; Column). The spira supports the equally sculpted and convexly curved torus . The spira customarily rises from a plinth. A special form of Ionic basis is developed in late 6th- and 5th-cent. BC Attic architecture, consisting of a torus as base surface, a concavely curved trochilus lying on it and a further torus on top of that, and dispenses with the spira as an …

Ante

(172 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Architectural component, i.e. a tongue-shaped projection from the face of a wall. A widespread practice in the ancient art of building (altars, temples, house architecture etc.). In stone construction, the ante stands out against the wall surface with profiled elements, usually rests on an ante foot (ante base) and is crowned by a special ante capital ( Column). As of late classical times, the ante is occasionally separated from the wall by a monolithic execution and thus overly e…

Palaistra

(191 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (παλαίστρα, Latin palaestra). The palaistra developed in the 6th cent. BC as a core element of a gymnasium (with illustration) and, together with a dromos (an elongated running-track) and various long colonnades and covered walkways,  forms a  constitutive part of this type of architecture. A palaistra consists of a roughly square court, surrounded by a peristyle, and various suites of adjacent rooms. Palaistrai were used as places for wrestling; the associated rooms were used for exercising, changing and storing equipment. Greek palaistrai were public spaces,…

Villa

(2,230 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] I. Definition In contrast to the townhouse ( domus) or the cottage ( casa; tugurium ), in Latin usage villa describes a combined residential and commercial building in the context of agriculture (V.), and occasionally an agricultural establishement including all facilities (usual term for this : praedium ). This connection with agriculture gradually dissipated in the 2nd cent. BC, a fact which is reflected in the increasingly differentiated range of terminology; along with the 'classical' v. rustica ('country house', 'country estate') which continued to …

Regia

(288 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] A two-part building complex on the via sacra on the edge of the Forum Romanum (Forum [III 8]) in Rome, which, according to the ancient Roman mythologizing historiography, was supposed to have been built as his residence and place of office by the legendary king Numa Pompilius (Ov. Fast. 6,263 f.; Tac. Ann. 15,41; Cass. Dio fr. 1,6,2; Plut. Numa 14; Fest. 346-348; 439; cf. also [1. 328]). The excavated building of striking structure, with a three-roomed core facing the via sacra and a court annexe ([2] with illustration; presumably this court is what was meant by regium atr…

Mausoleum Augusti

(422 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] According to Suetonius (Augustus 100,4; cf. Str. 5,3,8) one of the earliest buildings built under Augustus on the Campus Martius in Rome. It was probably begun in 28 BC, inspired in form and content by the Maussoleum and the tomb of Alexander [4] the Great, and completed around 23 BC. A circular building with a total diameter of 87 m, it consisted of an indeterminate number of concentrical walls made of tuff, that had been several stories high and were connected by radial walls. T…

Thalamos

(145 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (θάλαμος/ thálamos). According to the earlier archaic perception a non-specific term for various rooms inside of a Greek house; according to more recent definition a bedroom of the master of the house or the women's apartments (cf. Hom. Il. 6,321; Hom. Od. 10,340 et passim), usually on the upper floor of a Classical Pastas or Prostas house (House [II] B) and therefore also according to Greek understanding belonging absolutely to the private sphere (Private sphere and public sphere). The ancient terminology is unclear; thalamos can also be the term for a weapo…

Amphiprostylos

(107 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] The plan layout of Greek  temples. An amphiprostylos is an ante temple ( Ante) without perimeter hall, which in front of the pronaos as well as on its rear side has an even number of columns each which are spread across the entire width of the building (cf. Vitr. De arch. 3,2,4). In comparison to the   prostylos , where the rows of columns decorate just the entrance and not the rear as well, the amphiprostylos is the form occurring less frequently. The most famous example is the temple of Nike on the Athenian Acropolis. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography H. Knell, Grundz…

Peripteros

(421 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (περίπτερος; perípteros). Colonnaded temple with only a single circle of columns (Temple), in contrast to the dipteros. The term appears in the Latin form for the first time in Vitruvius (3,2,1 et passim). The peripteros rises from a stepped base (Krepis [1]; Stylobate), in the 5th cent. BC with canonical 6×13 columns (in the 6th cent. BC other concepts can be found, esp. elongated forms, primarily in western Greece). It is the standard form of the Greek temple. The regularity of the column positions (Spacing, i…

Impluvium

(60 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] The water basin in the  atrium of the Roman house in which rainwater from the  compluvium, the opening of the atrium, was collected and which was often part of a  cistern. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography E. M. Evans, The Atrium Complex in the Houses of Pompeii, 1980 R. Förtsch, Arch. Komm. zu den Villenbriefen des jüngeren Plinius, 1993, 30f.

Cenaculum

(85 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] From Latin ceno; originally the dining room on the upper floor of the Roman  house. From time to time the term cenaculum includes the entire upper floor (Varro, Ling. 5,162; Fest. 54,6); the rooms described as cenacula were for accommodating guests of an inferior rank or slaves. They could also be the object of a lease; cenaculum became in this context synonymous with shabby housing. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography Georges, 1, 1067, s.v. c. (sources) G. Matthiae, s.v. Cenacolo, EAA 2, 467 (bibliography).

Gable

(306 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Greek ἀ(ι)ετός/ a(i)etós (architectural inscriptions: [1. 33f.]); Latin fastigium, fronton; triangular front, framed by the horizontal and raking cornices, of the saddleback roof of a typical Greek columned building; sacred architecture, the gable field (tympanon, for the terminology see: Vitr. De arch. 3,5,12; 4,3,2) is frequently decorated with sculptures; cf.  architectural sculpture. The pitch and hight of a gable in  proportion to the columns and the entablature provide some indicati…

Naiskos

(98 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (ναΐσκος/naḯskos, ‘little temple’). A small temple-shaped building without a surrounding peristyle. In the technical terminology of classical archaeology the term is used for small free-standing architectural structures (e.g. well houses; wells) as well as (occasionally) for specially designed cella constructions within a temple (e.g. in the temple of Apollo at Didyma), occasionally also synonymous with naós (Cella). Also used of tomb reliefs with seemingly architectural wall ends, which protruded because of their spatially deepened surroundings. Höcker…

Principia

(102 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] The headquarters or commander's office of a Roman legion camp or fort, located at the heart of the facility as its administrative and religious centre, at the intersection of the two main streets (Cardo, Decumanus). The principia consisted of an open courtyard with a sanctuary for the standards, enclosed by the grouping of the legion's administrative buildings, arsenal and assembly rooms for the officers. Castra; Praetorium Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography A. Johnson, Roman Forts of the 1st and 2nd Century AD in Britain and the German Provinces, 1983  H. von …

Pastas

(103 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (παστάς; pastás). Transverse hall that in the Greek house (with fig.) connects the courtyard with the residential block behind it; an extension of the porch (prostas) issuing from the courtyard in older residential buildings, e.g. the houses of Priene, into a type of corridor and therefore a typologically determining element of the more modern, late Classical residential dwellings like those of Olynthus. The pastas house forms the nucleus of later, large-scale peristyle houses. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography W. Hoepfner, E.L. Schwandner, Haus und St…

Tower

(181 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Apart from defensive and protective installations (Fortifications) and funerary architecture, towers are found in Graeco-Roman architecture primarily in domestic constructions, particularly in rural areas. They were used there partly as representational buildings, but also as safe places of refuge in period of crisis and also as well ventilated places for storing agricultural produce which were difficult for pests to reach. The significance of 'Greek tower farmsteads' as a type of…

Theatrum Balbi

(202 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Stone theatre on the Campus Martius in Rome (Rome III.), begun by L. Cornelius [I 7] Balbus on the occasion of his triumph over the Garamantes in 19 BC and dedicated in 13 BC (Suet. Aug. 29,5; Cass. Dio 54,25,2). Significant remains survive in modern Rome in the area around the Piazza Paganica, some of them unexcavated. The theatre, which was rebuilt several times and after the fire of AD 80 probably entirely reconstructed, held an audience of about 8000 and was therefore the smal…

Central-plan building

(740 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] The term central-plan building (CB) describes an edifice -- either detached or integrated into an architectural ensemble - with main axes of equal or nearly equal lengths, so that none is dominant. The basic shapes of a CB are a circle, a square, or a regular polygon, sometimes with an additional projection to set off the entrance. According to this definition, the Greek  tholos is a centralized building, as are various other examples of circular  funerary architecture ( Tumulus; …

Spolia

(532 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] [1] Technical term in history of art and architecture (from Latin spolium, 'arms stripped from an enemy, booty'). Technical term of archaeology and art history, denoting parts of earlier buildings or monuments reused in constructive or decorative contexts. Scholars long saw the use of spolia in architecture and decoration as a symptom of decline in architecture, of the dissolution of the Classical Orders (Column) and of a lack of imagination and technical ability in respect of architectural …

Stasicrates

(40 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (Στασικράτης; Stasikrátēs). A Hellenistic architect recorded only in Plutarch (Plut. Alexander 72; Plut. Mor. 335c ff.); probably confused by Plutarch with Deinocrates or miswritten and identical with him (Deinocrates [3], also with bibliogr.). Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)

Aithousa

(107 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (αἴθουσα; aíthousa). In Homer (Od. 17,29; 18,102; 22,466; Il. 6,243; 20,11, the term for the entrance hall of a  house, which is adorned with columns and joined to the court gate. The portion located in front is called   prothyron (Il. 24,323; Od. 3,493). Entrance halls of this type can already be found on palaces of the 2nd millennium and in the early Greek house architecture; they then become a common element on Greek  temples. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography F. Noack, Homer. Paläste, 1903, 53 H. L. Lorimer, Homer and the Monuments, 1950, 415-422 H. Drerup, A…

Dipteros

(668 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (Greek δίπτερος; dípteros: two-winged; building equipped with double pterón = gallery or perambulatory). Technical term for a Greek  temple with a frontage of at least eight columns, whose  cella is enclosed on all sides by at least two, on the ends even three rows of columns; the term is only known from Vitruvius (3,1,10; 3,2,1; 3,2,7; 3,3,8; 7 praef. 15), but not elsewhere in Greek architectural terminology. In comparison with a  peripteros with its simple set of columns, the dipteros ─…

Telesterion

(181 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (τελεστήριον/ telestḗrion; teletḗ ). In Greek usage a general term for a temple of mysteries or a chapel of devotion for the Eleusinian gods, named after the Telesterion in the sanctuary of Demeter in Eleusis (on the building there see Eleusis [1] C.; cf. also Mysteries B.2.). Besides the site at Eleusis there is evidence of telestḗria in the Attic town of Phlya, the Heraion at Argos [II 1] and the Kabeirion at Thebes [2]. In Eleusis the Telesterion changed from a small megaron-shaped temple between the early 6th cent. and the late 5th…

Lighthouses

(338 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] This architecturally designed sea mark, Greek φάρος/ pháros, Lat. pharus, had its precursors in the open fires mentioned as early as Homer (Od. 10,30 et passim). These were raised on pillars or struts, and marked the entrances of harbours (Piraeus, 5th cent. BC; Harbours, docks) or (rarely) dangerous coastal features (at the same time, misleading coastal fires had been a means used by pirates from time immemorial to cause ships to be stranded, with the aim of plundering them; Navigation;…

Concha

(61 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Latin for shell, snail (Greek κόγχη/ kónchē), also describes shell-shaped vessels or large drinking-bowls as well as the snail-shaped horn of Triton (Verg. Aen. 6,171; Plin. HN 9,9). In early Christian literature concha designates the upper half-dome of the  apse and the water basin used for baptisms and baths. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography G. Matthiae, s.v. Conca, EAA 2, 779.

Roofing

(1,496 words)

Author(s): Hausleiter | Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient and Egypt Because of the state of preservation of buildings, roofing methods in the ancient Near East can generally only be inferred from pictorial representations. Depictions on cylinder seals and remains of beams ('Temple C' in Uruk; end of the 4th millennium BC) are early evidence for flat roofs as the normal roofing method for public and private buildings in southern Mesopotamia and other parts of the Near East. In mountainous parts of the Near East, the existence…

Stoa

(796 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
(στοά; stoá). [German version] [1] Structure Ancient description for a long covered walkway, gallery or portico resting on columns and structurally enclosed at the back. The earliest examples in Greek architecture occur around 700 BC; the derivation of its style is unclear: features recalling the early Greek architecture of the Geometric Period can no more be substantiated than connections with Oriental tent construction. In the Archaic Period the stoa was largely restricted to sanctuaries; here, as i…

Aithusa

(100 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (αἴθουσα). Bei Homer (Od. 17,29; 18,102; 22,466; Il. 6,243; 20,11) die Bezeichnung für die Eingangshalle des Hauses, die mit Säulen versehen und mit dem Hoftor verbunden ist. Der davor gelegene Teil heißt Prothyron (Il. 24,323; Od. 3,493). Eingangshallen dieser Art finden sich bereits an den Palästen des 2. Jt. und in der frühgriech. Hausarchitektur; sie werden dann gängiges Element am griech. Tempel. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography F. Noack, Homer. Paläste, 1903, 53  H. L. Lorimer, Homer and the Monuments, 1950, 415-422  H. Drerup, ArchHom II, O (Bau…

Joch

(589 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Mod. t.t. in der arch. Bauforsch., der im ant. Säulenbau den Achsabstand zweier Säulen bezeichnet (im Gegensatz zum lichten Raum dazwischen, dem auch in der ant. Architekturterminologie als Begriff bezeugten Interkolumnium; vgl. [1]); in der angelsächs. Fachlit. wird das J. meist als “interaxial space” bezeichnet. Das J. war, bes. im Konzept des griech. Peripteraltempels klass. Zeit (Tempel), als eine notwendigerweise klar definierte Teilmenge der Achsweiten (d.h. der Distanzen z…

Apsis

(482 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (ἀψίς). “Bogen, Wölbung”, lat. apsis bzw. absida, vgl. auch Exedra. Halbkreisförmiges, z. T. auch polygonales, gedecktes Architekturelement, meist als Raumabschluß oder Raumteil verwandt. In der ägäischen Hausarchitektur (Haus) früh belegt; Häuser mit langrechteckigem Grundriß, der am rückwärtigen Ende durch eine halbkreisförmige A. abgeschlossen wird, finden sich schon in den untersten Schichten Troias (Troia I a), in der gesamten ägäischen Bronzezeit und auch in der geom. Architektur…

Kuppel, Kuppelbau

(742 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] “Unechte” K.-Bauten aus geschichteten Kragsteingewölben (Gewölbe- und Bogenbau) finden sich in den Mittelmeerkulturen seit dem 3. Jt.v.Chr. verschiedentlich; sie sind offenbar weitgehend unabhängig voneinander in den Architekturbestand des minoischen Kreta (Tholosgräber von Mesara und Knosos), des myk. Griechenland (“Schatzhaus” des Atreus in Mykene; “Kuppelgrab” bei Orchomenos), Sardiniens (“Nuraghen”), Thrakiens und Skythiens (sog. “Bienenkorb”-K. an Gräbern, s. thrakische Arch…

Mons Testaceus

(104 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Künstlicher Berg (nach Art einer mod. Mülldeponie) im Süden des Mons Aventinus in Rom, ein etwa 30 m hoher, im Umfang gut 1000 m messender ant. Schutthügel, der größtenteils aus den Scherben (lat. testa, testaceum - daher der Name) von Transportamphoren (Tongefäße) besteht, die als Bruch in den nahen Hafen- und Speicheranlagen anfielen. Das Gros der über eine Rampe hierher verbrachten Scherben entstammt der Zeit von ca. 140 bis 250 n.Chr. Der M.T. bildet als geschlossener Befund ein nahezu einmaliges Archiv röm…

Naïskos

(80 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (ναΐσκος, “Tempelchen”). Ein kleiner, tempelförmiger Bau ohne umlaufende Ringhalle. In der klass.-arch. Fachterminologie wird der Begriff für freistehende Kleinarchitekturen (z.B. Brunnen-Häuser) ebenso verwendet wie (vereinzelt) für speziell ausgeformte Cella-Bauten innerhalb eines Tempels (z.B. beim Apollontempel von Didyma), bisweilen auch syn. mit naós (Cella), ferner für Grabreliefs mit an Architektur erinnernden, räumlich in die Tiefe gebauten Anten-Vorsätzen. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography W. Müller-Wiener, Griech. Bauwese…

Latrinen

(155 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Mit einer Kanalisation verbundene Abortanlagen finden sich im griech.-röm. Kulturraum erstmals im minoischen Kreta (Sitz-L. im Palast von Knosos), danach erst wieder im Hell.; im archa. und klass. Griechenland dominierten L., die aus einem Sitz über einem transportablen Gefäß bestanden. Dieses vergleichsweise primitive Prinzip begegnet auch in der röm. Kultur weiterhin (etwa in den mehrstöckigen Mietshäusern der Großstädte), während seit spätrepublikanischer Zeit reich mit Marmor…

Architekt

(1,259 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] A. Etymologie, Begrifflichkeit, Abgrenzung Der erst für das 5. Jh. v. Chr. bezeugte Begriff A. leitet sich vom griech. ἀρχιτέκτων her (Hdt. 3.60; 4.87); dieser Terminus ist wiederum abgeleitet von τέκτων; τεκτωσύνη (Zimmermannshandwerk), was zeigt, daß der A. früharcha. Zeit zunächst mit Holz und erst später auch mit Stein als Baumaterial konfrontiert war. Diesem griech. Wortfeld ist das lat. arc(h)itectus entlehnt. A. bezeichnet mit dem Bauen verbundene banausischhandwerkliche Tätigkeiten; nicht im heutigen Sinne eine visionäre Professi…

Kerameikos

(135 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Ant. Bezeichnung für einen dḗmos / Stadtteil Athens (Athenai II.7), vom Norden der athenischen Agora bis hin zur Akademeia reichend; eine urspr. sumpfige, vom Lauf des Eridanos [2] durchzogene Ebene, in der Athens Töpferviertel, v.a. aber seit sub-myken. Zeit der Hauptbegräbnisplatz der Stadt lag. Dieser entwickelte sich im 6. Jh.v.Chr. zur zentralen, von verschiedenen Straßen durchzogenen Nekropole Athens, die durch die themistokleische Mauer (479/8 v.Chr.) geteilt…

Lararium

(189 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Meist im Atrium, bisweilen auch in der Küche, dem Peristyl oder dem Garten des röm. Hauses gelegenes, privat-familiäres Heiligtum bzw. Kultmal für die lares familiares (Laren; Personifikation), entweder in Form einer Nische, eines Tempelchens (Aedicula) oder aber in Gestalt einer illusionistisch-architektonischen Wandmalerei. Lararia waren urspr. mit Statuetten und weiteren Weihegaben je nach Vermögen ausgeschmückt und im gesellschaftlichen Umgang wichtige Orte der familiären Repräsentation. Zahlreiche L. haben sich in d…

Insula

(642 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Von lat. insula (“Insel”, “Wohnhaus”) abgeleiteter mod. t.t. der Urbanistik, der beim Städtebau die allseits von Straßen umgebene und durch diese Struktur markierte Fläche für die Bebauung bezeichnet. Insulae sind nicht ausschließlich ein Produkt städtebaulicher Gesamtplanungen. Sie sind innerhalb eines orthogonalen Straßennetzes zwar in der Regel von rechteckiger oder trapezoider, seltener quadratischer Form, zugleich heißt aber auch der Terrain-Ausschnitt des unregelmäßigen Straß…

Saepta

(81 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Ein von Portiken umzogener großer, rechteckiger Platz auf dem Marsfeld (Campus Martius) in Rom, auf dem sich (vorgeblich seit der Zeit der mythischen Könige) die waffenfähigen Bürger im Rahmen der Centuriats-Comitien ( comitia ) zu den Beamtenwahlen versammelten; seit dem 6. Jh. v. Chr. als Baulichkeit nachgewiesen. Unter Caesar wurde der Platz (als Saepta Iulia) gleichermaßen architektonisch prunkvoll neugestaltet, wie das politisch-funktionale Gremium der Centuriats-Comitien zu einem pseudorepublikanischen Relikt reduziert wurde. …

Ante

(153 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Architekturteil, zungenförmige Stirnseite einer Wand. In der ant. Baukunst weit verbreitet (Altäre, Tempel, Hausarchitektur etc.). Die A. ist im Steinbau durch Profilierung von der Wandfläche abgesetzt, erhebt sich meist über einem A.nfuß (A.nbasis) und wird durch ein spezielles A.nkapitell (Säule) bekrönt. Ab spätklass. Zeit wird die A. bisweilen von der Wand durch monolithe Ausführung getrennt und so überdeutlich als Schmuckglied betont (z. B. Tegea, Athenatempel). Zum Antentem…

Aule

(206 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Bei Homer (Od. 14,5) der umbaute lichte Hofraum eines Hauses. Seit dem 7.Jh. v.Chr. ist die A. Kernbestandteil des griech. Hofhauses, wo sich die mehrräumige Hausanlage um die auch landwirtschaftlich, etwa als Stall, genutzte A. herumgruppiert. Die Entstehung des Hofhauses bildet einen markanten Schnittpunkt in der Entwicklung der griech. Hausarchitektur; es verdrängt die bis dahin üblichen Formen des Einraumhauses (Megaronbau, Oval- u. Apsidenhaus). Die A. war meist gepflastert;…

Rednerbühne

(613 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Unter einer R. (griech. βῆμα/ bḗma; lat. rostra, Pl.) wird ein sehr unterschiedlich ausgeformtes erhöhtes Podium, eine Kanzel (früh-christl. ámbōn, lat. ambo) oder eine Art Tribüne verstanden, die den Redner über sein Publikum hinaushob und auf diese Weise nicht nur aus akustischer Sicht sinnvoll war, sondern zugleich auch dem hierauf agrierenden Protagonisten im Sinne einer bedeutungsmäßigen “Heraushebung” über die Umgebung Besonderheit verlieh. Bereits in den archa. griech. Bürgergemeinschaften wird es, wie in allen zum Konsens gezwungene…

Prothyron

(95 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (πρόθυρον). Die Eingangshalle des griech. Hauses in Form eines überdachten, auf den Hof führenden Vorraumes, der die Verbindung von Privatbereich und Öffentlichkeit markiert und somit (da das p. auch Passanten als Unterstand oder Treffpunkt dienen konnte) als kommunikativ verbindendes Element genutzt wurde. Bisweilen war das p. sogar mit Bänken ausgestattet. Das p. konnte nach Innen durch eine meist zweiflügelige Holztür verschlossen werden. Zahlreiche próthyra haben sich an den Häusern von Olynthos erhalten. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography W. H…

Greek Revival

(1,603 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) RWG
Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) RWG [English version] A. Allgemeines (RWG) G. R. bezeichnet einen architekturhistorischen t.t., der das kopierende bzw. imitierende Aufgreifen ant.-griech. Architekturmuster im späteren 18. und 19. Jh. beschreibt. Der Begriff wurde nach 1900 im angelsächsischen Sprachraum geprägt und wird üblicherweise in diesem Sinne auch als regional beschränkt verstanden (auf Großbritannien und die USA); eine Ausgrenzung analoger Erscheinungsformen klassizistischer Architektur anderer Lände…

Peripteros

(368 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (περίπτερος). Ringhallentempel, im Gegensatz zum Dipteros nur mit einfachem Säulenkranz (Tempel). Der Begriff in lat. Schreibweise erscheint erstmalig bei Vitruv (3,2,1 u.ö.). Der P., der sich mit im 5. Jh.v.Chr. kanonischen - 6×13 Säulen auf dem Stufenbau (Krepis [1]; Stylobat) erhebt (im 6. Jh. v.Chr. finden sich demgegenüber verschiedene andere Konzepte, bes. gelängte Bauformen, v.a. in Westgriechenland), bildet den Regelfall des griech. Tempels. Die Regelmäßigkeit der Säulens…

Parthenon

(849 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
(Παρθενών). [English version] I. Funktion Tempelförmiges Bauwerk auf der Akropolis von Athen (Athenai II.1. mit Plan; Tempel); benannt nach dem u.a. von Pausanias (1,23,5-7) bezeugten 12 m hohen, chryselephantinen Standbild der Athena Parthenos des Pheidias im Innern des Bauwerks (Goldelfenbeintechnik mit Abb.). Die Kultfunktion des P. wird in der arch. Forsch. kontrovers diskutiert. Bis h. ist es indessen weder gelungen, einen Kult der Athena Parthenos noch einen dem Bau zugehörigen Altar nachzuweis…

Eierstab

(190 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Markantes Ornament aus dem Dekorationskanon der ion. Architektur, in der modernen arch. Fachterminologie auch “ionisches Kymation” genannt: eine Profilleiste gewölbten Querschnitts, dessen reliefiertes oder gemaltes Ornament aus einem Wechsel von ovalen Blättern und lanzettenförmigen Zwickelspitzen besteht und das am unteren Ende oft von einem mit dem Rhythmus des E. korrespondierenden Perlstab (Astragal) abgeschlossen wird. Der E. ziert neben dem Epistylion bzw. dem Fries vor al…

Fornix

(218 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Lat. Begriff für Bogen. Als t.t. der ant. Architektur bezeichnet f. den Bogen eines Gewölbes bzw. das Gewölbe selbst sowie den gemauerten Bogen einer Brücke oder eines Aquädukts; ferner überwölbte Lücken im Mauerwerk für Türen und Fenster (vgl. auch Gewölbe- und Bogenbau). Gemeint sein kann ferner ein Kellergewölbe oder Kellergeschoß; Schmutz und vermeintliche Lasterhaftigkeit der Kellerhöhlen begründen vermutlich die seit dem 1. Jh. n.Chr. gängige neue Bed. des Begriffs f. als “Bordell” (z.B. Hor. epist. 1,14,21 u.ö.) bzw. als Ausdruck für jede …

Materiatio

(774 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] A. Begriff Bei Vitruv (4,2,1) benutzter Sammelbegriff für alle Arten des Holzbaus bzw. der im Bauwesen notwendigen Gewerke des Zimmermannshandwerks; M. umfaßt dabei sowohl den Bereich des konstruktiven Holzbaus im Sinne der Errichtung von Fachwerken, Dachstühlen (Überdachung), Galerien oder Zwischendecken wie auch die Herstellung einzelner, für den Holzbau technisch notwendiger Hilfsmittel (Dübel, Holznägel; Keile; Sparren; Pflöcke) sowie schließlich die Erstellung von temporär ben…

Opaion

(76 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (ὀπαῖον). Öffnung innerhalb eines Daches oder einer Kuppel in der ant. Architektur; ein wesentliches Element der Beleuchtung ant. Bauten. In der griech. Architektur selten (“Laterne” des Lysikrates-Monuments in Athen; Telesterion von Eleusis), im röm. Kuppelbau hingegen üblich. Kuppel, Kuppelbau; Überdachung Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography W.D. Heilmeyer (Hrsg.), Licht und Architektur, 1990  C. Spuler, O. und Laterne. Zur Frage der Beleuchtung ant. und frühchristl. Bauten durch ein O. und zur Entstehung der Kuppellaterne, 1973.

Lesche

(105 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (λέσχη). Zu den griech. Versammlungsbauten gehörige Architektur, in denen sich Bürger zu Verhandlungen, Geschäften oder Unterredungen zusammenfanden (der Begriff L. ist von griech. λέγω, “sprechen/reden”, abgeleitet); meist in der Nähe der Agora oder - als Weihung - in Heiligtümern anzutreffen und bes. hier bisweilen auch als Herberge dienend. Die von Paus. 10,15ff. beschriebene L. der Knidier in Delphi (Delphoi), ein langrechteckiger Saalbau mit acht Innensäulen, war berühmt weg…

Euthynteria

(114 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Seltener antiker t.t. aus der griech. Architektur; nach IG II2, 1668, Z. 15-18 (Syngraphe des Philon-Arsenals), bezeichnet E. die das Fundament abschließende, nivellierte Standfläche der aufgehenden Wand eines Bauwerks; auf dieser E. erhoben sich die Orthostaten. Der Begriff E. wird in der modernen arch. Terminologie üblicherweise allgemeiner verwendet und meint die oberste und somit erste nivellierte, leicht über das Bodenniveau herausragende Fundamentschicht beim griech. Säulenbau, auf der sich die Krepis erhebt. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliogra…

Hagia Sophia

(366 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Bedeutendste Kirche Konstantinopels. Sie wurde am Ort der 532 n.Chr. in einem Aufstand zerstörten Kirche Μεγάλη Ἐκκλησία ( Megálē Ekklēsía; 1. H. 4. Jh.) auf Betreiben und Kosten Iustinians nach Entwürfen der Architekten Anthemios von Tralles und Isidoros [9] von Milet als riesig dimensionierte Kombination von Langhaus und Zentralbau errichtet. Die gewaltige Kuppel lastet auf vier in den Fels gegründeten Pfeilern. Am 27. 12. 537 im Beisein des Kaisers geweiht (Prok. aed. 1,1,20-78; Malalas 479 B), …

Balbis

(99 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Start- und Zieleinrichtung des griech. Stadion. Die b. war eine mit Rillen versehene, im Boden eingelassene Steinschwelle, in der Starttore aus Holzpfählen verankert waren; die Rillen dienten als Widerlager für die Füße beim Start. Zahlreiche Exemplare sind erh., u.a. in Olympia, Delphi, Nemea, Ephesos. Bilddarstellungen in der Rundplastik, Reliefkunst und Vasenmalerei. Darüber hinaus kann b. auch die Abwurfmarke beim Diskus- oder Speerwurf bezeichnen. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography W. Zschietzschmann, Wettkampf- und Übungsstätten in Gr…

Peristylion

(158 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (περιστύλιον, lat. peristylium). Repräsentatives Element öffentlicher und privater ant. Architektur; mit P. wird die einen Hof oder Platz begrenzende Säulenhalle (Säule) bezeichnet. In der griech. Architektur finden sich Peristylia seit dem späten 4. Jh.v.Chr. gehäuft in Privathäusern (Haus), daneben an zahlreichen repräsentativen öffentlichen Bauten, z.B. Gymnasien, Palaistren, Bibliotheken, Theatern und verschiedenen Versammlungsbauten (Buleuterion und Prytaneion). Das P. ist von…

Principia

(88 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Das Stabsgebäude bzw. die Kommandantur eines röm. Legionärslagers oder Kastells, als administratives und rel. Zentrum der Anlage in deren Mitte, am Schnittpunkt der beiden Hauptstraßen (Cardo, Decumanus) gelegen. Die P. bestanden aus einem offenen Hof mit Fahnenheiligtum, um den herum sich die Truppenverwaltung, Waffenarsenale sowie Versammlungsräume für das Offizierscorps gruppierten. Castra; Praetorium Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography A. Johnson, Roman Forts of the 1st and 2nd Century AD in Britain and the German Provinces, 1983  H. von Petri…

Lacus Curtius

(127 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Monument auf dem Forum Romanum in Rom, das bereits in der Ant. mit verschiedenen Mythen der Frühzeit Roms in Verbindung gebracht wurde (Curtius [1]). Wohl in augusteischer Zeit erbaut, gehört der L.C. zu denjenigen Denkmälern auf dem stadtröm. Forum, die der Materialisierung, der Vergegenwärtigung und der Vergewisserung röm. Frühzeit sowie der Einbindung der Myth. in eine chronistisch geprägte Tatsächlichkeitsschilderung dienten. Der L.C. besteht aus einem unregelmäßigen, gepflas…

Cenaculum

(75 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Von lat. ceno; urspr. das Speisezimmer im Obergeschoß des röm. Hauses. Bisweilen umfaßt der Begriff c. das gesamte obere Stockwerk (Varro ling. 5,162; Festus 54,6); die mit c. bezeichneten Räume dienten zur Unterbringung von Gästen minderen Ranges oder Sklaven. Sie konnten auch Mietsache sein; c. wurden in diesem Kontext zum Synonym der ärmlichen Wohnung. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography Georges, 1, 1067, s.v. c. (Quellen)  G. Matthiae, s.v. Cenacolo, EAA 2, 467 (Lit.).

Ptolemaion

(72 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Mod. Bezeichnung für verschiedene Bauten der Ptolemaier-Dynastie, die dem Herrscherkult dienten; als erstes P. gilt ein von Ptolemaios [3] II. unmittelbar neben dem Grab Alexandros' [4] d.Gr. errichteter Bau (von Ptolemaios [7] IV. dann mit dem Alexandergrab zu einem zusammenhängenden Mausoleumskomplex verschmolzen). Weitere P. entstanden u. a. in Athen (Gymnasion), Limyra (?) und Rhodos (Temenos). Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography J. Borchardt, Ein P. in Limyra, in: RA 1991, 309-322  Will, Bd. 1, 329.

Kenotaphion

(214 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (κενοτάφιον, lat. cenotaphium, wörtl. “leeres Grab”). Als K. bezeichnet die klass. Arch. einen Grabbau ohne die Überreste einer Bestattung; ein K. bildete in der Regel ein Ehrenmal für einen Verstorbenen, dessen Leichnam entweder nicht mehr greifbar war, wie z.B. bei in der Fremde oder auf See gefallenen Kriegern, oder aber eine besondere Form des Heroon (Heroenkult). Nicht selten stellte die Errichtung eines K. eine herausragende Ehrung seitens des Gemeinwesens oder der Familie au…

Dipteros

(558 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (griech. δίπτερος: zweiflügelig; mit doppeltem pterón = Umgang versehen). Bei Vitruv (3,1,10; 3,2,1; 3,2,7; 3,3,8; 7 praef. 15) überlieferter, ansonsten in der griech. Architekturterminologie nicht nachgewiesener t.t. für einen griech. Tempel mit mindestens acht Frontsäulen, dessen Cella allseitig von zwei, an den Schmalseiten u.U. von drei Säulenreihen umgeben ist. Das im Vergleich zum Peripteros mit seinem einfachen Säulenkranz überaus aufwendige, arbeits-, material- und transportin…

Akroter

(107 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (Akroterion). Akroteria sind plastische Figuren oder Ornamentaufsätze, die den First (Mittel-A.) oder die Seiten (Seiten-A.) von Giebeln repräsentativer öffentlicher Gebäude zieren. A. können aus Ton oder Stein (Poros, Marmor) sein; im 7./6. Jh. v. Chr. dominieren zunächst ornamentierte, runde Scheiben-A. (z. B. Heraion von Olympia), später dann plastisch ausgearbeitete Pflanzenkombinationen (Voluten u. Palmetten) oder statuarische Figuren und Figurengruppen (Gorgo, Nike, Sphinx u. a. myth. Gestalten). Vgl. Bauplastik. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) B…

Anathyrose

(93 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Ant. t.t. aus der Bautechnik (IG VII 3073, 121; 142). Im gr. Quaderbau bezeichnet A. das teilweise Abarbeiten der Kontaktflächen zwischen zwei Quadern oder Säulentrommeln (meist durch Pickung). Durch diese von außen unsichtbare Minimierung der Kontaktzone zweier Bauglieder konnte deren Paßgenauigkeit erhöht werden; die Fugen bildeten, von außen betrachtet, ein Netz von haarfeinen Linien. Nachteil der A. ist ein erhöhter Druck auf die reduzierten krafttragenden Flächen, was beim Versatz leicht zu Beschädigungen der Bauglieder führen konnte. Höcker, Christ…
▲   Back to top   ▲