Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)" )' returned 373 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Latrines

(182 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] The first toilet facilities connected with sewers in the Graeco-Roman cultural area are to be found in Minoan Crete (sit-down latrines in the palace of Knosos), then not again until the Hellenistic period; in archaic and classical Greece, latrines that consisted of a seat over a transportable vessel were predominant. This comparably primitive principle is also further encountered in Roman culture (for instance in the multi-storey tenement blocks in the large cities), whilst from…

Tracing (in full size)

(140 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Scratched or scored lines in architecture (Construction technique; Building trade). The architect's plan was successively transmitted to the emerging building at a scale of 1:1 by tracing. Tracings are recorded from the pre-Greek era in Mesopotamian and Egyptian architecture; in Graeco-Roman architecture, tracing long made scale construction drawings unnecessary. Well-preserved or documented tracings are found, among other places, on the Propylaea in Athens, the large tholos in Delphi and the more recent temple of Apollo in Didyma. Höcker, Christoph (Kissi…

Peristasis

(95 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (περίστασις; perístasis). Ancient Greek term for a ring of columns (Column), and hence a colonnade in a Greek temple or other ancient buildings with surrounding columns [1]. The colonnade can be formed of a single row (Peripteros) or a double row (Dipteros) (cf. also Peristylion. On formal problems relating to peristaseis in Greek temple construction: Angle triglyph problem; Inclination; Curvature; Proportion). Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography 1 F. Ebert, Fachausdrücke des griechischen Bauhandwerks I. Der Tempel, Diss. Würzburg, 1910, 23…

Eupalinus

(359 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] of Megara, son of Naustrophus, as an  architect and engineer, presumably under the tyrant  Polycrates, was responsible for the construction of a  water supply system for the town of  Samos (modern Pythagoreion on the island of Samos) described by Herodotus (3,60) as one of the great feats of Greek engineering; there is no evidence of further work by E. The system that was rediscovered in 1853 consists of four building complexes connected with each other: a fountainhead building situated high in the mountain ( Wells) with a great covered water reservoir, a pipeline c. 840…

Tector

(48 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] ( tector albarius). According to Vitr. De arch. 2,8,20 a Roman craftsman who was responsible for plastering walls, as a rule in three layers, the top layer of which could be painted or stuccoed while still moist. Construction technique; Fresco; Stucco; Wall-painting Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)

Loretum

(87 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (also Lauretum, from laureus, ‘bay-tree’). Place on the Aventine Hill in Rome ( Roma) where bay-trees grow. According to legend the burial place of Titus Tatius (Festus 496 L.). Already at the time of Varro (Varro, Ling. 5,152) the site could no longer be located with certainty. The possibility that L. was divided into two parts ( L. minor and L. maior) is a matter for discussion because of two corresponding street names in Regio XIII (cf. CIL 6,975). Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography Richardson, 234f.

Mandrocles

(87 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Architect of Samos. For a considerable fee he built the pontoon bridge over the Bosporus (Hdt. 4,87,1ff.) for Darius [1] I in 513/2 BC in the context of the campaign against the Scythians. M. attained fame through a votive offering in the Heraeum of Samos: a panel painting described in detail by Herodotus (4,88,1-89,2), which depicted the (pontoon) bridge and praised the architect in an epigram. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography H. Svenson-Evers, Die griechische Architekten archaischer und klassischer Zeit, 1996, 59-66 (with additional literature).

Crypta, Cryptoporticus

(212 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] From the Greek κρυπτή ( kryptḗ); in the description of the Nile barge of Ptolemy IV, transmitted in Athenaeus 5, 205a, it designated a closed walkway lit by windows. In Lat. texts cryptoporticus could cover various items of architecture such as cellars (Vitr. De arch. 6, 8), vaults (Juv. 5, 106) or even subterranean, vaulted cult or grave structures. In modern archaeological terminology the term cryptoporticus is used synonymously with crypta; this compound word from crypta and   porticus that comes to us only from Pliny (Ep. 2,17,20; 5,6…

Spira

(158 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] The cylinder, in some cases lavishly sculpted and sometimes decorated with a double trochilus and convex and concave sections, that forms the 'middle layer' of a conventional old-Ionic column base (Samos, Heraion; Column). The spira supports the equally sculpted and convexly curved torus . The spira customarily rises from a plinth. A special form of Ionic basis is developed in late 6th- and 5th-cent. BC Attic architecture, consisting of a torus as base surface, a concavely curved trochilus lying on it and a further torus on top of that, and dispenses with the spira as an …

Ante

(172 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Architectural component, i.e. a tongue-shaped projection from the face of a wall. A widespread practice in the ancient art of building (altars, temples, house architecture etc.). In stone construction, the ante stands out against the wall surface with profiled elements, usually rests on an ante foot (ante base) and is crowned by a special ante capital ( Column). As of late classical times, the ante is occasionally separated from the wall by a monolithic execution and thus overly e…

Palaistra

(191 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (παλαίστρα, Latin palaestra). The palaistra developed in the 6th cent. BC as a core element of a gymnasium (with illustration) and, together with a dromos (an elongated running-track) and various long colonnades and covered walkways,  forms a  constitutive part of this type of architecture. A palaistra consists of a roughly square court, surrounded by a peristyle, and various suites of adjacent rooms. Palaistrai were used as places for wrestling; the associated rooms were used for exercising, changing and storing equipment. Greek palaistrai were public spaces,…

Villa

(2,230 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] I. Definition In contrast to the townhouse ( domus) or the cottage ( casa; tugurium ), in Latin usage villa describes a combined residential and commercial building in the context of agriculture (V.), and occasionally an agricultural establishement including all facilities (usual term for this : praedium ). This connection with agriculture gradually dissipated in the 2nd cent. BC, a fact which is reflected in the increasingly differentiated range of terminology; along with the 'classical' v. rustica ('country house', 'country estate') which continued to …

Regia

(288 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] A two-part building complex on the via sacra on the edge of the Forum Romanum (Forum [III 8]) in Rome, which, according to the ancient Roman mythologizing historiography, was supposed to have been built as his residence and place of office by the legendary king Numa Pompilius (Ov. Fast. 6,263 f.; Tac. Ann. 15,41; Cass. Dio fr. 1,6,2; Plut. Numa 14; Fest. 346-348; 439; cf. also [1. 328]). The excavated building of striking structure, with a three-roomed core facing the via sacra and a court annexe ([2] with illustration; presumably this court is what was meant by regium atr…

Mausoleum Augusti

(422 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] According to Suetonius (Augustus 100,4; cf. Str. 5,3,8) one of the earliest buildings built under Augustus on the Campus Martius in Rome. It was probably begun in 28 BC, inspired in form and content by the Maussoleum and the tomb of Alexander [4] the Great, and completed around 23 BC. A circular building with a total diameter of 87 m, it consisted of an indeterminate number of concentrical walls made of tuff, that had been several stories high and were connected by radial walls. T…

Thalamos

(145 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (θάλαμος/ thálamos). According to the earlier archaic perception a non-specific term for various rooms inside of a Greek house; according to more recent definition a bedroom of the master of the house or the women's apartments (cf. Hom. Il. 6,321; Hom. Od. 10,340 et passim), usually on the upper floor of a Classical Pastas or Prostas house (House [II] B) and therefore also according to Greek understanding belonging absolutely to the private sphere (Private sphere and public sphere). The ancient terminology is unclear; thalamos can also be the term for a weapo…

Amphiprostylos

(107 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] The plan layout of Greek  temples. An amphiprostylos is an ante temple ( Ante) without perimeter hall, which in front of the pronaos as well as on its rear side has an even number of columns each which are spread across the entire width of the building (cf. Vitr. De arch. 3,2,4). In comparison to the   prostylos , where the rows of columns decorate just the entrance and not the rear as well, the amphiprostylos is the form occurring less frequently. The most famous example is the temple of Nike on the Athenian Acropolis. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography H. Knell, Grundz…

Peripteros

(421 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (περίπτερος; perípteros). Colonnaded temple with only a single circle of columns (Temple), in contrast to the dipteros. The term appears in the Latin form for the first time in Vitruvius (3,2,1 et passim). The peripteros rises from a stepped base (Krepis [1]; Stylobate), in the 5th cent. BC with canonical 6×13 columns (in the 6th cent. BC other concepts can be found, esp. elongated forms, primarily in western Greece). It is the standard form of the Greek temple. The regularity of the column positions (Spacing, i…

Impluvium

(60 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] The water basin in the  atrium of the Roman house in which rainwater from the  compluvium, the opening of the atrium, was collected and which was often part of a  cistern. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography E. M. Evans, The Atrium Complex in the Houses of Pompeii, 1980 R. Förtsch, Arch. Komm. zu den Villenbriefen des jüngeren Plinius, 1993, 30f.

Cenaculum

(85 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] From Latin ceno; originally the dining room on the upper floor of the Roman  house. From time to time the term cenaculum includes the entire upper floor (Varro, Ling. 5,162; Fest. 54,6); the rooms described as cenacula were for accommodating guests of an inferior rank or slaves. They could also be the object of a lease; cenaculum became in this context synonymous with shabby housing. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography Georges, 1, 1067, s.v. c. (sources) G. Matthiae, s.v. Cenacolo, EAA 2, 467 (bibliography).

Gable

(306 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Greek ἀ(ι)ετός/ a(i)etós (architectural inscriptions: [1. 33f.]); Latin fastigium, fronton; triangular front, framed by the horizontal and raking cornices, of the saddleback roof of a typical Greek columned building; sacred architecture, the gable field (tympanon, for the terminology see: Vitr. De arch. 3,5,12; 4,3,2) is frequently decorated with sculptures; cf.  architectural sculpture. The pitch and hight of a gable in  proportion to the columns and the entablature provide some indicati…

Naiskos

(98 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (ναΐσκος/naḯskos, ‘little temple’). A small temple-shaped building without a surrounding peristyle. In the technical terminology of classical archaeology the term is used for small free-standing architectural structures (e.g. well houses; wells) as well as (occasionally) for specially designed cella constructions within a temple (e.g. in the temple of Apollo at Didyma), occasionally also synonymous with naós (Cella). Also used of tomb reliefs with seemingly architectural wall ends, which protruded because of their spatially deepened surroundings. Höcker…

Principia

(102 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] The headquarters or commander's office of a Roman legion camp or fort, located at the heart of the facility as its administrative and religious centre, at the intersection of the two main streets (Cardo, Decumanus). The principia consisted of an open courtyard with a sanctuary for the standards, enclosed by the grouping of the legion's administrative buildings, arsenal and assembly rooms for the officers. Castra; Praetorium Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography A. Johnson, Roman Forts of the 1st and 2nd Century AD in Britain and the German Provinces, 1983  H. von …

Pastas

(103 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (παστάς; pastás). Transverse hall that in the Greek house (with fig.) connects the courtyard with the residential block behind it; an extension of the porch (prostas) issuing from the courtyard in older residential buildings, e.g. the houses of Priene, into a type of corridor and therefore a typologically determining element of the more modern, late Classical residential dwellings like those of Olynthus. The pastas house forms the nucleus of later, large-scale peristyle houses. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography W. Hoepfner, E.L. Schwandner, Haus und St…

Tower

(181 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Apart from defensive and protective installations (Fortifications) and funerary architecture, towers are found in Graeco-Roman architecture primarily in domestic constructions, particularly in rural areas. They were used there partly as representational buildings, but also as safe places of refuge in period of crisis and also as well ventilated places for storing agricultural produce which were difficult for pests to reach. The significance of 'Greek tower farmsteads' as a type of…

Theatrum Balbi

(202 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Stone theatre on the Campus Martius in Rome (Rome III.), begun by L. Cornelius [I 7] Balbus on the occasion of his triumph over the Garamantes in 19 BC and dedicated in 13 BC (Suet. Aug. 29,5; Cass. Dio 54,25,2). Significant remains survive in modern Rome in the area around the Piazza Paganica, some of them unexcavated. The theatre, which was rebuilt several times and after the fire of AD 80 probably entirely reconstructed, held an audience of about 8000 and was therefore the smal…

Central-plan building

(740 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] The term central-plan building (CB) describes an edifice -- either detached or integrated into an architectural ensemble - with main axes of equal or nearly equal lengths, so that none is dominant. The basic shapes of a CB are a circle, a square, or a regular polygon, sometimes with an additional projection to set off the entrance. According to this definition, the Greek  tholos is a centralized building, as are various other examples of circular  funerary architecture ( Tumulus; …

Spolia

(532 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] [1] Technical term in history of art and architecture (from Latin spolium, 'arms stripped from an enemy, booty'). Technical term of archaeology and art history, denoting parts of earlier buildings or monuments reused in constructive or decorative contexts. Scholars long saw the use of spolia in architecture and decoration as a symptom of decline in architecture, of the dissolution of the Classical Orders (Column) and of a lack of imagination and technical ability in respect of architectural …

Stasicrates

(40 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (Στασικράτης; Stasikrátēs). A Hellenistic architect recorded only in Plutarch (Plut. Alexander 72; Plut. Mor. 335c ff.); probably confused by Plutarch with Deinocrates or miswritten and identical with him (Deinocrates [3], also with bibliogr.). Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)

Aithousa

(107 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (αἴθουσα; aíthousa). In Homer (Od. 17,29; 18,102; 22,466; Il. 6,243; 20,11, the term for the entrance hall of a  house, which is adorned with columns and joined to the court gate. The portion located in front is called   prothyron (Il. 24,323; Od. 3,493). Entrance halls of this type can already be found on palaces of the 2nd millennium and in the early Greek house architecture; they then become a common element on Greek  temples. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography F. Noack, Homer. Paläste, 1903, 53 H. L. Lorimer, Homer and the Monuments, 1950, 415-422 H. Drerup, A…

Dipteros

(668 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (Greek δίπτερος; dípteros: two-winged; building equipped with double pterón = gallery or perambulatory). Technical term for a Greek  temple with a frontage of at least eight columns, whose  cella is enclosed on all sides by at least two, on the ends even three rows of columns; the term is only known from Vitruvius (3,1,10; 3,2,1; 3,2,7; 3,3,8; 7 praef. 15), but not elsewhere in Greek architectural terminology. In comparison with a  peripteros with its simple set of columns, the dipteros ─…

Telesterion

(181 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (τελεστήριον/ telestḗrion; teletḗ ). In Greek usage a general term for a temple of mysteries or a chapel of devotion for the Eleusinian gods, named after the Telesterion in the sanctuary of Demeter in Eleusis (on the building there see Eleusis [1] C.; cf. also Mysteries B.2.). Besides the site at Eleusis there is evidence of telestḗria in the Attic town of Phlya, the Heraion at Argos [II 1] and the Kabeirion at Thebes [2]. In Eleusis the Telesterion changed from a small megaron-shaped temple between the early 6th cent. and the late 5th…

Lighthouses

(338 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] This architecturally designed sea mark, Greek φάρος/ pháros, Lat. pharus, had its precursors in the open fires mentioned as early as Homer (Od. 10,30 et passim). These were raised on pillars or struts, and marked the entrances of harbours (Piraeus, 5th cent. BC; Harbours, docks) or (rarely) dangerous coastal features (at the same time, misleading coastal fires had been a means used by pirates from time immemorial to cause ships to be stranded, with the aim of plundering them; Navigation;…

Concha

(61 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Latin for shell, snail (Greek κόγχη/ kónchē), also describes shell-shaped vessels or large drinking-bowls as well as the snail-shaped horn of Triton (Verg. Aen. 6,171; Plin. HN 9,9). In early Christian literature concha designates the upper half-dome of the  apse and the water basin used for baptisms and baths. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography G. Matthiae, s.v. Conca, EAA 2, 779.

Roofing

(1,496 words)

Author(s): Hausleiter | Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient and Egypt Because of the state of preservation of buildings, roofing methods in the ancient Near East can generally only be inferred from pictorial representations. Depictions on cylinder seals and remains of beams ('Temple C' in Uruk; end of the 4th millennium BC) are early evidence for flat roofs as the normal roofing method for public and private buildings in southern Mesopotamia and other parts of the Near East. In mountainous parts of the Near East, the existence…

Stoa

(796 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
(στοά; stoá). [German version] [1] Structure Ancient description for a long covered walkway, gallery or portico resting on columns and structurally enclosed at the back. The earliest examples in Greek architecture occur around 700 BC; the derivation of its style is unclear: features recalling the early Greek architecture of the Geometric Period can no more be substantiated than connections with Oriental tent construction. In the Archaic Period the stoa was largely restricted to sanctuaries; here, as i…

Templum Pacis

(280 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] ('Temple of peace'). A square (Forum) in Rome, designed and consecrated in AD 71 - after the capture of Jerusalem - under Vespasianus in analogy to the Fora of Caesar and Augustus whose nearly square, column-encircled court leads to a temple on the south-eastern side. The space between the TP and the Forum Augustum was probably kept open originally - a measure intended to avoid a direct ideological-political analogy between the Fora of Caesar and Augustus on the one hand and this …

Curvature

(279 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Modern technical term of scholarship devoted to ancient architecture; it describes the krepidoma observable in some Doric peripteral temples from the middle of the 6th cent. BC (e.g. temple of Apollo of  Corinth = earliest evidence; Aphaea Temple of  Aegina;  Parthenon; great temple of  Segesta) and rarely also in Ionic buildings (e.g. temple of Apollo of  Didyma) -- and resulting from this -- the arrangement ascending to the entablature. This phenomenon mentioned by Vitruvius (3,4,5), as wel…

Frieze

(280 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Modern technical term, commonly used since the 17th cent. in the history of art and architecture (from French frise), which, as an architectonical term, designates that part of the stone entablature that rests on the architrave ( Epistylion) in Greek column construction. The frieze of Doric buildings consists of an alternating sequence of  metope and  triglyphos (the whole of which is in Greek building inscriptions referred to as τρίγλυφος, tríglyphos [1. 29-30]), the frieze of Ionian buildings, which can (in contrast to that of the Doric order) b…

Konistra

(35 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Term used by Pollux (3,154 and 9,43), Athenaeus (12,518d) and other late sources for the open courtyard, often strewn with sand, of the Greek gymnasium; cf. also Palaistra. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)

Kerameikos

(154 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Ancient name for a dḗmos / district of Athens ( Athens II.7), stretching from north of the Athenian agora to the Academy; originally a swampy plain crossed by the Eridanus [2], in which lay the Athenian potters' district, but above all, the chief cemetery of the city since the sub-Mycenaean period. In the 6th cent. BC, it developed into the central necropolis of Athens, crossed by various roads, and divided by the Themistoclean Wall (479/8 BC); the Dipylon Gate la…

Heraion

(35 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (Ἥραιον; Hḗraion). General term for sanctuaries of the goddess  Hera; more important Heraia are found, among others, in  Argos,  Olympia,  Paestum, Perachora and on the island of  Samos. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)

Dock­yards

(346 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (νεώρια/ neṓria, neut. pl.; Lat. navalia, neut. pl.). There is no evidence of dockyards as permanent structural establishment for  shipbuilding in the early Greek period; shipbuilding took place as a specialized part of the   materiatio at places chosen on an ad hoc basis in each case close to coasts or harbours (Pylos [1]; cf. Hom. Od. 6,263-272). At the latest since the early 6th cent. BC, as a feature of the autonomy of the Greek  polis, dockyards were part of the infrastructure of the navy ( navies) in the same way as…

Viminalis

(71 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] One of the seven hills of the city of Rome (Rome III A with map 1), between the Mons Quirinalis and the Esquiliae. In the early Imperial period an elegant residential quarter (Mart. 7,73,2); at the turn of the 3rd/4th cents. AD in the northeastern part of the hill enormous thermae were built, founded by the emperor Diocletianus (Thermae [1 II D]). Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliogra…

Parthenon

(964 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
(Παρθενών; Parthenṓn). [German version] I. Function Temple-shaped building on the Acropolis of Athens (II.1. with map; Temple); named after the 12 m high chryselephantine statue of Athena Parthenos by Phidias inside the building (Gold-ivory technique with fig.), which was mentioned by Pausanias (1,23,5-7) and others. The cultic purpose of the Parthenon is a subject of lively controversy in archaeological research. However, to date it has remained impossible to find evidence for a cult of Athena Parthe…

Hippodamus

(554 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] (Ἱππόδαμος; Hippódamos) of Miletus. Greek architect, town planner and author of writings on political theory; the ‘Hippodamian system’, which was erroneously named after him, a right-angled urban grid, was already known in archaic times in the colonies in the West and in Ionia ( Insula;  Town planning). H.'s lifetime and period of activity is uncertain; the rebuilding of  Miletus (479 BC), which was destroyed in the Persian Wars, is connected to him as well as the building of the c…

Mutulus

(171 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Ancient Latin technical term (Varro, Rust. 3,5,13; Vitr. De arch. 4,1,2; 4,2,5 et passim) for part of the corbel block on the geison of Doric Greek temple rafters. A Greek analogue of this special technical term is unknown. The individual components of the block were probably collectively called the geíson. The mutulus is the overhanging plate with usually 3 × 6 drops ( guttae), which appears in a regular sequence above the metope triglyph frieze and supports its rhythm. The length of the mutulus is equivalent to the measure of the triglyph ( tríglyphos ) and a regula on the architrave (epistylion). It appears, separated by spaces ( viae) centred over the metope. In a wooden buildings the mutulus was a component of the roof corbel and served as a water-deflecting protection for the overall structure. Like many other components of Doric temple rafters, it was perpetuated as a technical anachronism in later stone construction. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography Ebert, 32f.  W. Müller-Wiener, Griechisches Bauwesen in der Antike, 1988, 113, 119f., 129f.

Inclination

(112 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] Modern technical term of archaeological construction research; what is described here is the noticeable slight inwards pitch of the  columns in the outer column circle in some Doric peripteral temples of the classical period (e.g.  Parthenon); together with the  entasis, the increased diameter of the co…

Senaculum

(56 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[German version] In Rome, together with the Curia, the assembly place of the Roman Senate ( Senatus ) at the Comitium (Forum [III 8] Romanum); beyond this specific location in the City of Rome and independent of it, a general term for a place where the Senate met. Assembly buildings Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography Richardson, 348.

Mausoleum Augusti

(388 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Nach Sueton (Augustus 100,4; vgl. Strab. 5,3,8) eines der frühesten unter Augustus auf dem Campus Martius in Rom (Roma) errichteten Gebäude, wohl 28 v.Chr. unter formaler und inhaltlicher Bezugnahme auf das Maussolleion und das Grabmal Alexandros' [4] d. Gr. begonnen und um 23 v.Chr. vollendet. Das kreisrunde Bauwerk mit insgesamt 87 m Dm bestand aus einer bis h. nicht völlig geklärten Anzahl konzentrisch ineinander gefügter und mehrstöckig aufgebauter Tuffmauern, die durch s…

Praefurnium

(22 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Feuerstelle für Kalk- oder Brennöfen sowie der zentrale Heizraum bei röm. Thermenanlagen. Bäder; Heizung; Thermen Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)

Compluvium

(78 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Nach Varro (ling. 5,161) und Vitruv (6,3,1f.) übliche Ausbildung der Dachöffnung an allen Typen des Atriums am röm. Haus. Die trichterartig nach innen geneigten Dachflächen des c. leiten das Regenwasser in das Impluvium, ein Becken im Zentrum des Atrium. Beim älteren displuvium sind die Dachflächen nach außen geneigt. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography E.M. Evans, The Atrium Complex in the Houses of Pompeii, 1980  R. Förtsch, Arch. Komm. zu den Villenbriefen des jüngeren Plinius, 1993, 30-31.

Mutulus

(152 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Ant.-lat. t.t. (Varro rust. 3,5,13; Vitr. 4,1,2; 4,2,5 u.ö.) für einen Teil des Kragsteinblocks am Geison dorischer griech. Tempelgebälke. Ein griech. Analogon dieses speziellen t.t. ist unbekannt; alle einzelnen Bestandteile des Blockes wurden hier wohl insgesamt als geíson bezeichnet. Unter dem M. versteht man die überhängende Platte mit meist 3 × 6 Tropfen (Guttae), die in regelmäßiger Reihung oberhalb des Metopen-Triglyphen-Frieses erscheint und diesen in seinem Rhythmus unterstützt. Der M. entspricht in seiner Breite dem Maß einer Triglyphe ( tríglyphon ) und einer Regula am Architrav (Epistylion); er erscheint dann, getrennt von Abständen ( viae), jeweils mittig gesetzt über den Metopen. Der M. war im Holzbau Bestandteil des überkragenden Daches und diente als wasserabweisender Schutz der Gesamtstruktur; er hat sich, wie zahlreiche Elemente des dorischen Tempelgebälkes, als ein technischer Anachronismus in den späteren Steinbau tradiert. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography Ebert, 32f.  W. Müller-Wiener, Griech. Bauwesen in der Ant., 1988, 113, 119f., 129f.

Pseudoperipteros

(90 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Bei Vitruv (4,8,6) überl. architektonischer Fachterminus, der ital.-röm. Tempel bezeichnet, deren seitliche Säulen der Vorhalle sich als der Kernmauer vorgeblendete Halbsäulen um die Cella herum fortsetzen und somit einen “unechten” Säulenkranz ohne einen wirklichen Umgang (griech.

Palaistra

(178 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (παλαίστρα, lat. palaestra). Die P. bildet sich im 6. Jh.v.Chr. als ein Kernelement des Gymnasions (mit Abb.) aus und formt, zusammen mit einem…

Cenaculum

(75 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Von lat. ceno; urspr. das Speisezimmer im Obergeschoß des röm. Hauses. Bisweilen umfaßt der Begriff c. das gesamte obere Stockwerk (Varro ling. 5,162; Festus 54,6); die mit c. bezeichneten Räume dienten zur Unterbringung von Gästen minderen Ranges oder Sklaven. Sie konnten auch Mietsache sein; c. wurden in diesem Kontext zum Synonym der ärmlichen Wohnung. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography Georges, 1, 1067, s.v. c. (Quellen)  G. Matthiae, s.v. Cenacolo, EAA 2, 467 (Lit.).

Ptolemaion

(72 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Mod. Bezeichnung für verschiedene Bauten der Ptolemaier-Dynastie, die dem Herrscherkult dienten; als erstes P. gilt ein von Ptolemaios [3] II. unmittelbar neben dem Grab Alexandros' [4] d.Gr. errichteter Bau (von Ptolemaios [7] IV. dann mit dem Alexandergrab zu einem zusammenhängenden Mausoleumskomplex verschmolzen). Weitere P. entstanden u. a. in Athen (Gymnasion), Limyra (?) und Rhodos (Temenos). Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography J. Borchardt, Ein P. in Limyra, in: RA 1991, 309-322  Will, Bd. 1, 329.

Kenotaphion

(214 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (κενοτάφιον, lat. cenotaphium, wörtl. “leeres Grab”). Als K. bezeichnet die klass. Arch. einen Grabbau ohne die Überreste einer Bestattung; ein K. bildete in der Regel ein Ehrenmal für einen Verstorbenen, dessen Leichnam entweder nicht mehr greifbar war, wie z.B. bei in der Fremde oder auf See gefallenen Kriegern, oder aber eine besondere Form des Heroon (Heroenkult). Nicht selten stellte die Errichtung eines K. eine herausragende Ehrung seitens des Gemeinwesens oder der Familie au…

Dipteros

(558 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (griech. δίπτερος: zweiflügelig; mit doppeltem pterón = Umgang versehen). Bei Vitruv (3,1,10; 3,2,1; 3,2,7; 3,3,8; 7 praef. 15) überlieferter, ansonsten in der griech. Architekturterminologie nicht nachgewiesener t.t. für einen griech. Tempel mit mindestens acht Frontsäulen, dessen Cella allseitig von zwei, an den Schmalseiten u.U. von drei Säulenreihen umgeben ist. Das im Vergleich zum Peripteros mit seinem einfachen Säulenkranz überaus aufwendige, arbeits-, material- und transportintensive Baukonzept (ein D. von 8 × 17 Säulen erforderte mindeste…

Akroter

(107 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (Akroterion). Akroteria sind plastische Figuren oder Ornamentaufsätze, die den First (Mittel-A.) oder die Seiten (Seiten-A.) von Giebeln repräsentativer öffentlicher Gebäude zieren. A. können aus Ton oder Stein (Poros, Marmor) sein; im 7./6. Jh. v. Chr. dominieren zunächst ornamentierte, runde Scheiben-A. (z. B. Heraion von Olympia), später dann plastisch ausgearbeitete Pflanzenkombinationen (Voluten u. Palmetten) oder statuarische Figuren und Figurengruppen (Gorgo, Nike, Sphinx u. a. myth. Gestalten). Vgl. Bauplastik. Höcker…

Anathyrose

(93 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Ant. t.t. aus der Bautechnik (IG VII 3073, 121; 142). Im gr. Quaderbau bezeichnet A. das teilweise Abarbeiten der Kontaktflächen zwischen zwei Quadern oder Säulentrommeln (meist durch Pickung). Durch diese von außen unsichtbare Minimierung der Kontaktzone zweier Bauglieder konnte deren Paßgenauigkeit erhöht werden; die Fugen bildeten, von außen betrachtet, ein Netz von haarfeinen Linien. Nachteil der A. ist ein erhöhter Druck auf die reduzierten krafttragenden Flächen, was beim Versatz leicht zu Beschädigungen der Bauglieder führen konnte. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography W. Müller-Wiener, Gr. Bauwesen in der Ant., 1988, 75-77, 90-93.

Säulenmonumente

(1,359 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] I. Allgemeines Die arch. Forsch. versteht unter S. die denkmalhaft verwendete, aus ihrem angestammten architektonischen Kontext herausgelöste, meist von einer Skulptur, einer Skulpturengruppe oder einem Gegenstand bekrönte Säule, entweder in der Art eines isoliert stehenden Einzelmonuments oder aber in gruppenartiger Aneinanderreihung. Beiden Varianten gemeinsam ist die durch die extrem überhöhte, weithin sichtbare Vertikale der Säule bewirkte Heraushebung des auf dem Kapitell plaz…

Angiportum

(55 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (Angiportus). Durchgang; synonym zu vicus. Nach Vitr. 1,6,1 im Gegensatz zu platea und via eine enge Gasse oder Nebenstraße, z. T. Sackgasse in der röm. Stadtanlage. Größere Häuser hatten einen vom A. erreichbaren rückw…

Lacunar

(227 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Bei Vitruv [1. s.v. l.] überl., dortselbst mehrfach auch als lacunaria (Pl.) bezeichneter architektonischer t.t. für die vertieften Kassetten, die als Deckenverkleidung zwischen sich kreuzenden Holzbalken angebracht waren (Überdachung); die griech. Entsprechung lautet phátnōma, gastḗr, kaláthōsis [2. 45-52 mit weiterer Benennung von Details der L.]. L. waren in der Regel plastisch eingetieft und mit Malerei bzw. Relief (meist ornamental) verziert. Am Tempel bzw. dem Säulenbau, ihrem zunächst ausschließlichen Anbringungsort in der griech. Architektur, bestanden die Kassetten der Celladecke aus Holz, die über den äußeren Ptera (Tempel) seit dem 6. Jh.v.Chr. (marmorne Kykladentempel) zunehmend oft aus Stein. Die Größe der einzelnen Kassetten war von den statischen Rahmenbedingungen bestimm…

Mausoleum Hadriani

(297 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Vermutlich um 130 n.Chr. unter Hadrianus begonnenes, 139 n.Chr. durch Antoninus Pius vollendetes und mit der Überführung und feierlichen Beisetzung des zuvor in Puteoli provisorisch bestatteten Leichnams des Hadrian eingeweihtes Grab-Monument am Westufer des Tibers; eigentlich in den Horti Domitiae gelegen, aber mit dem Campus Martius über die neuerbaute Pons Aelius (134 n.Chr. eingeweiht) unmittelbar ver…

Puteal

(76 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Von lat. puteus (“Brunnen”) abgeleitete Bezeichnung für die Einfassung von z. T. überdeckelten profanen Ziehbrunnen oder die steinerne Markierung heiliger Blitzmale. P. waren bes. in der neoattischen Kunst des Hell. ein beliebter Träger von Reliefskulptur. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography E. Bielefeld, Ein neuattisches P. in Kopenhagen, in: Gymnasium 70, 1963, 338-356  K. Schneider, s. v. P., RE 23, 2034…

Mauerwerk

(1,396 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] A. Definition Unter M. werden im folgenden die verschiedenen Konstruktions- und Gestaltungstechniken des Aufbaus von Gebäudewände…

Mandrokles

(78 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Architekt aus Samos, baute gegen ein beträchtliches Honorar für Dareios [1] I. im Jahr 513/2 v.Chr. im Kontext des Skythen-Feldzuges die Schiffsbrücke über den Bosporus (Hdt. 4,87,1ff.). Berühmtheit erlangte M. durch ein in das Heraion von Samos gestiftetes Weihgeschenk: ein von Herodot (4,88,1-89,2) detailliert beschriebenes Tafelgemälde, das die (Ponton-)Brücke darstellte und den Erbauer in einem Epigramm rühmte. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography H. Svenson-Evers, Die griech. Architekten archa. und klass. Zeit, 1996, 59-66 (mit weiterer Lit.).

Hypogäum

(261 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Sammelbezeichnung für unterirdisch angelegte Architekturen. Das H. bildet im mod. Verständnis überwiegend einen Teilbereich der Grabbauten, wobei mit H. eine unter das Erdniveau gesetzte Architektur gemeint ist und nicht eine mit Erdreich überschüttete, zunächst oberirdisch erbaute im Sinne des Tumulus mit einer Grabkammer darin; ferner können (mit einem Grab wesensmäßig eng verwandte) Heroa (z.B. dasjenige von Kalydon) sowie Baulichkeiten für besondere Kultanlagen (z.B. das Nekr…

Gynaikonitis

(81 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (γυναικωνῖτις). Im Gegensatz zum andrṓn [4] bezeichnet g. den introvertierten Frauentrakt im griech. Haus, der in der Regel von dem eher extrovertierten Bereich der Männerwelt abgeschlossen im Obergeschoß des Gebäudes lag und auch die Werkzeuge der wirtschaftlichen Produktion der Frau (Webstuhl, Spinnrad etc.) barg; die mindere Stellung der Frau in der patriarchalischen Gesellschaft Griechenlands kam in dies…

Aithusa

(100 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (αἴθουσα). Bei Homer (Od. 17,29; 18,102; 22,466; Il. 6,243; 20,11) die Bezeichnung für die Eingangshalle des Hauses, die mit Säulen versehen und mit dem Hoftor verbunden ist. Der davor…

Joch

(589 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Mod. t.t. in der arch. Bauforsch., der im ant. Säulenbau den Achsabstand zweier Säulen bezeichnet (im Gegensatz zum lichten Raum dazwischen, dem auch in der ant.…

Apsis

(482 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (ἀψίς). “Bogen, Wölbung”, lat. apsis bzw. absida, vgl. auch Exedra. Halbkreisförmiges, z. T. auch polygonales, gedecktes Architekturelement, meist als Raumabschluß oder Raumteil verwandt. In der ägäischen Hausarchitektur (Haus) früh belegt; Häuser mit langrechteckigem Grundriß, der am rückwärtigen Ende durch eine halbkreisförmige A. abgeschlossen wird, finden sich schon in den untersten Schichten Troias (Troia I a), in der gesamten ägäischen Bronzezeit und auch in der geom. Architektur Griechenlands (u. a. Antissa, Lefkandi, Le…

Hippodamos

(512 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] aus Milet. Griech. Architekt, Stadtplaner und Autor staatstheoretischer Schriften; das fälschlich nach ihm benannte “hippodamische System” eines rechtwinkelig angelegten urbanistischen Rasters war in den Koloniestädten des Westens und in Ionien bereits in archa. Zeit bekannt (Insula; Städtebau). Die Lebens- und Schaffenszeit des H. ist ungewiß; mit ihm wird der Neuaufbau des in den Perserkriegen zerstörten Miletos (479 v.Chr.) ebenso verbunden wie der Bau der Stadtanlage von Peir…

Konistra

(34 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Von Pollux (3,154 und 9,43), Athenaios (12,518d) und weiteren späten Schriftquellen verwendeter Begriff für den ungedeckten, oft mit Sand bestreuten Hof des griech. Gymnasion; vgl. auch Palaistra. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)

Leuchtturm

(284 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Das griech. φάρος/ pháros, lat. pharus bezeichnete, architektonisch geformte Seezeichen hat seine Vorformen in den bereits bei Homer (Od. 10,30 u.ö.) gen., auf Säulen oder Streben erhöht plazierten offenen Feuern, die die Einfahrten von Häfen (Piräus, 5. Jh. v.Chr.; Hafenanlagen) oder (selten) gefährliche Küstenpunkte markierten (wobei irreführende Küstenfeuer seit alters her zugleich ein bei Piraten gebräuchliches Mittel waren, Schiffe zwecks Ausplünderung stranden zu lassen; Schiffa…

Könnensbewußtsein

(262 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Von dem Althistoriker Ch. Meier [1. 435-439] geprägter mod. Begriff, mit dem das technisch-qualitative wie zugleich auch das damit interferierende polit. Selbstverständnis des Handwerkerstands in klass. griech. Zeit in demokratisch-pluralistischem Kontext präzisiert ist; K. umfaßt in diesem Sinne einen wichtigen Aspekt bzw. Teilbereich des griech. Begriffs téchnē (vgl. auch Demiurgos [2] und [3], Handwerk, Künstler, Kunst, Technik, technítai , Technologie). Neben anderen Handwerkszweigen begegnet bes. im Bauwesen des…

Pastas

(85 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (παστάς). Querhalle, die beim griech. Haus (mit Abb.) den Hof mit dem dahinterliegenden Wohntrakt verbindet; eine Erweiterung der vom Hof ausgehenden Vorhalle (Prostas) älterer Wohnhäuser, z.B. der Häuser von Priene, hin zu einer Art Korridor und deshalb typologisch bestimmendes Element modernerer, spätklass. Wohnhäuser wie derjenigen von Olynthos. Das P.-Haus bildet die Keimzelle späterer großflächiger Peristylhäuser. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography W. Hoepfner, E.L. Schwandner, Haus und Stadt im Klass. Griechenland, 21994, 354 s.v. P.  W. M…

Loretum

(70 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (auch Lauretum, von laureus, “Lorbeer-”). Lorbeerbestandener Platz auf dem Aventin in Rom (Roma); der Legende nach der Begräbnisplatz des Titus Tatius (Festus 496 L.). Der Ort war zu Varros Zeit (Varro ling. 5,152) bereits nicht mehr sicher lokalisierbar; eine mögliche Mehrteiligkeit des L. ( L. minor und L. maior) wird wegen zweier entsprechender Straßennamen in der Regio XIII (vgl. CIL 6,975) diskutiert. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography Richardson, 234f.

Guttae

(120 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Lat. für Tropfen (Pl.); in architektonischem Sinne einzig bei Vitruv (4,1,2 und 4,3,6) belegter ant. t.t. für die tropfenartigen zylindrischen Gebilde, die sich an Teilen des steinernen Gebälks der dor. Bauordnung finden und die als imitierte Nägel bzw. Nagelköpfe die anachronistische Transformation der einstigen Holzbauform in den kanonischen dor. Steintempel bezeugen [1. 53-55; 3. 10-13]. G. finden sich in (meist) drei parallelen Sechser-Reihen am Mutulus des Geison sowie am Architrav als unterer Abschluß der Regula [2. 112-120]. Höcker, Christoph (K…

Impluvium

(57 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Das Wasserbecken im Atrium des röm. Hauses, in dem sich das vom Compluvium, der Lichtöffnung des Atriums, zusammengeführte Regenwasser sammelte und das oft Teil einer Zisterne war. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography E.M. Evans, The Atrium Complex in the Houses of Pompeii, 1980  R. Förtsch, Arch. Komm. zu den Villenbriefen des jüngeren Plinius, 1993, 30f.

Regula

(99 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (lat. “Leiste”, “Latte”, auch “Richtschnur”). Bei Vitr. 4,3,4 u.ö. verwendeter architektonischer t.t., der eine mit Guttae versehene Leiste am Epistylion (Architrav) eines Bauwerks dorischer Ordnung bezeichnet. Die R. entspricht in ihrer Abmessung der Breite des Triglyphos und bildet dessen unteren, baulich-strukturell dem Architrav (und nicht dem Fries) zugehörigen Abschluß. Die R. korrespondiert zudem mit den auf dem Fries aufliegenden Blöcken des Geison. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography D. Mertens, Der Tempel von Segesta und die doris…

Megaron

(366 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (μέγαρον). Im homer. Epos mehrfach (u.a. Hom. Od. 2,94; 19,16; 20,6) gen. Bautrakt; offenbar der Hauptraum des Palastes bzw. des Hauses mit dem Gemeinschaftsherd in der Mitte. Zu späteren Erwähnungen des M. in der griech. Lit. (bes. Hdt. 7,140f.) vgl. Tempel. Über das Verständnis des Begriffs M. und dementsprechend die Herleitung der jeweils damit verbundenen Bauform bestehen in der arch. Forsch. erhebliche Auffassungsunterschiede: Zum einen wurde unter M., analog den Homerpassagen, ein Bautrakt, also ein Raum oder eine…

Prostylos

(58 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Durch Vitr. 3,2,3 überl. architektonischer Fachterminus, der eine der von Vitr. aufgelisteten Tempelformen bezeichnet (Tempel). Der P. ist gemäß Vitruvs Beschreibung ein Antentempel (Ante) mit einer Säulenreihe vor dem Pronaos (Cella). Eine erweiterte Variante des P. ist der Amphiprostylos. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography W. Müller-Wiener, Griech. Bauwesen in der Ant., 1988, 217 s. v. P.

Byzes

(61 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Architekt oder Bauhandwerker aus Naxos, um 600 v.Chr. tätig. Pausanias (5,10,3) schloß aus einem angeblichen Epigramm, daß B. als erster Dachziegel aus Marmor fertigte. Eine Aufschrift auf einem Marmordachziegel von der Athener Akropolis (CY=BY im naxischen Alphabet) wurde als Hinweis auf B. gedeutet. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography H. Svenson-Evers, Die griech. Architekten archa. und klass. Zeit, 1996, 374.

Horologium (Solare) Augusti

(141 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Die von Plinius (nat. 36,72f.) beschriebene, in der Regentschaft des Augustus auf dem Marsfeld in Rom (Roma) entstandene, im 1. und 2. Jh. n.Chr. mehrfach erneuerte Sonnenuhr mit Kalenderfunktionen; der Gnomon (Uhr) bestand aus einem Obelisk, der seinen Schatten auf eine gepflasterte Fläche mit einem Liniennetz warf, das mittels Bronzeeinlagen markiert war. Die im Anschluß an verschiedene Ausgrabungen und Interpretationen der ant. und neuzeitlichen Textüberl. vorgestellte Rekonst…

Kuppel, Kuppelbau

(742 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] “Unechte” K.-Bauten aus geschichteten Kragsteingewölben (Gewölbe- und Bogenbau) finden sich in den Mittelmeerkulturen seit dem 3. Jt.v.Chr. verschiedentlich; sie sind offenbar weitgehend unabhängig voneinander in den Architekturbestand des minoischen Kreta (Tholosgräber von Mesara und Knosos), des myk. Griechenland (“Schatzhaus” des Atreus in Mykene; “Kuppelgrab” bei Orchomenos), Sardiniens (“Nuraghen”), Thrakiens und Skythiens (sog. “Bienenkorb”-K. an Gräbern, s. thrakische Arch…

Mons Testaceus

(104 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Künstlicher Berg (nach Art einer mod. Mülldeponie) im Süden des Mons Aventinus in Rom, ein etwa 30 m hoher, im Umfang gut 1000 m messender ant. Schutthügel, der größtenteils aus den Scherben (lat. testa, testaceum - daher der Name) von Transportamphoren (Tongefäße) besteht, die als Bruch in den nahen Hafen- und Speicheranlagen anfielen. Das Gros der über eine Rampe hierher verbrachten Scherben entstammt der Zeit von ca. 140 bis 250 n.Chr. Der M.T. bildet als geschlossener Befund ein nahezu einmaliges Archiv röm…

Naïskos

(80 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] (ναΐσκος, “Tempelchen”). Ein kleiner, tempelförmiger Bau ohne umlaufende Ringhalle. In der klass.-arch. Fachterminologie wird der Begriff für freistehende Kleinarchitekturen (z.B. Brunnen-Häuser) ebenso verwendet wie (vereinzelt) für speziell ausgeformte Cella-Bauten innerhalb eines Tempels (z.B. beim Apollontempel von Didyma), bisweilen auch syn. mit naós (Cella), ferner für Grabreliefs mit an Architektur erinnernden, räumlich in die Tiefe gebauten Anten-Vorsätzen. Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) Bibliography W. Müller-Wiener, Griech. Bauwese…

Latrinen

(155 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Mit einer Kanalisation verbundene Abortanlagen finden sich im griech.-röm. Kulturraum erstmals im minoischen Kreta (Sitz-L. im Palast von Knosos), danach erst wieder im Hell.; im archa. und klass. Griechenland dominierten L., die aus einem Sitz über einem transportablen Gefäß bestanden. Dieses vergleichsweise primitive Prinzip begegnet auch in der röm. Kultur weiterhin (etwa in den mehrstöckigen Mietshäusern der Großstädte), während seit spätrepublikanischer Zeit reich mit Marmor…

Architekt

(1,259 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] A. Etymologie, Begrifflichkeit, Abgrenzung Der erst für das 5. Jh. v. Chr. bezeugte Begriff A. leitet sich vom griech. ἀρχιτέκτων her (Hdt. 3.60; 4.87); dieser Terminus ist wiederum abgeleitet von τέκτων; τεκτωσύνη (Zimmermannshandwerk), was zeigt, daß der A. früharcha. Zeit zunächst mit Holz und erst später auch mit Stein als Baumaterial konfrontiert war. Diesem griech. Wortfeld ist das lat. arc(h)itectus entlehnt. A. bezeichnet mit dem Bauen verbundene banausischhandwerkliche Tätigkeiten; nicht im heutigen Sinne eine visionäre Professi…

Kerameikos

(135 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Ant. Bezeichnung für einen dḗmos / Stadtteil Athens (Athenai II.7), vom Norden der athenischen Agora bis hin zur Akademeia reichend; eine urspr. sumpfige, vom Lauf des Eridanos [2] durchzogene Ebene, in der Athens Töpferviertel, v.a. aber seit sub-myken. Zeit der Hauptbegräbnisplatz der Stadt lag. Dieser entwickelte sich im 6. Jh.v.Chr. zur zentralen, von verschiedenen Straßen durchzogenen Nekropole Athens, die durch die themistokleische Mauer (479/8 v.Chr.) geteilt…

Lararium

(189 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Meist im Atrium, bisweilen auch in der Küche, dem Peristyl oder dem Garten des röm. Hauses gelegenes, privat-familiäres Heiligtum bzw. Kultmal für die lares familiares (Laren; Personifikation), entweder in Form einer Nische, eines Tempelchens (Aedicula) oder aber in Gestalt einer illusionistisch-architektonischen Wandmalerei. Lararia waren urspr. mit Statuetten und weiteren Weihegaben je nach Vermögen ausgeschmückt und im gesellschaftlichen Umgang wichtige Orte der familiären Repräsentation. Zahlreiche L. haben sich in d…

Insula

(642 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Von lat. insula (“Insel”, “Wohnhaus”) abgeleiteter mod. t.t. der Urbanistik, der beim Städtebau die allseits von Straßen umgebene und durch diese Struktur markierte Fläche für die Bebauung bezeichnet. Insulae sind nicht ausschließlich ein Produkt städtebaulicher Gesamtplanungen. Sie sind innerhalb eines orthogonalen Straßennetzes zwar in der Regel von rechteckiger oder trapezoider, seltener quadratischer Form, zugleich heißt aber auch der Terrain-Ausschnitt des unregelmäßigen Straß…

Saepta

(81 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Ein von Portiken umzogener großer, rechteckiger Platz auf dem Marsfeld (Campus Martius) in Rom, auf dem sich (vorgeblich seit der Zeit der mythischen Könige) die waffenfähigen Bürger im Rahmen der Centuriats-Comitien ( comitia ) zu den Beamtenwahlen versammelten; seit dem 6. Jh. v. Chr. als Baulichkeit nachgewiesen. Unter Caesar wurde der Platz (als Saepta Iulia) gleichermaßen architektonisch prunkvoll neugestaltet, wie das politisch-funktionale Gremium der Centuriats-Comitien zu einem pseudorepublikanischen Relikt reduziert wurde. …

Ante

(153 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Architekturteil, zungenförmige Stirnseite einer Wand. In der ant. Baukunst weit verbreitet (Altäre, Tempel, Hausarchitektur etc.). Die A. ist im Steinbau durch Profilierung von der Wandfläche abgesetzt, erhebt sich meist über einem A.nfuß (A.nbasis) und wird durch ein spezielles A.nkapitell (Säule) bekrönt. Ab spätklass. Zeit wird die A. bisweilen von der Wand durch monolithe Ausführung getrennt und so überdeutlich als Schmuckglied betont (z. B. Tegea, Athenatempel). Zum Antentem…

Aule

(206 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Bei Homer (Od. 14,5) der umbaute lichte Hofraum eines Hauses. Seit dem 7.Jh. v.Chr. ist die A. Kernbestandteil des griech. Hofhauses, wo sich die mehrräumige Hausanlage um die auch landwirtschaftlich, etwa als Stall, genutzte A. herumgruppiert. Die Entstehung des Hofhauses bildet einen markanten Schnittpunkt in der Entwicklung der griech. Hausarchitektur; es verdrängt die bis dahin üblichen Formen des Einraumhauses (Megaronbau, Oval- u. Apsidenhaus). Die A. war meist gepflastert;…

Rednerbühne

(613 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Unter einer R. (griech. βῆμα/ bḗma; lat. rostra, Pl.) wird ein sehr unterschiedlich ausgeformtes erhöhtes Podium, eine Kanzel (früh-christl. ámbōn, lat. ambo) oder eine Art Tribüne verstanden, die den Redner über sein Publikum hinaushob und auf diese Weise nicht nur aus akustischer Sicht sinnvoll war, sondern zugleich auch dem hierauf agrierenden Protagonisten im Sinne einer bedeutungsmäßigen “Heraushebung” über die Umgebung Besonderheit verlieh. Bereits in den archa. griech. Bürgergemeinschaften wird es, wie in allen zum Konsens gezwungene…

Chersiphron

(142 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] aus Knossos. Vater des Metagenes; zusammen mit ihm die bei Strabon (14,640), Vitruvius (3,2,7) und Plinius (nat. 7,125; 36,95) überlieferten Architekten des archa. Dipteros der Artemis in Ephesos (2. H. 6.Jh. v.Chr.). Beide verfaßten eine Vitruv offenbar noch bekannte Schrift über diesen Tempel (Vitr. 7,1,12), die zu den frühesten Zeugnissen der ant. Architekturtheorie zählt; Ch. galt wegen der Entwicklung einer Walzenkonstruktion für den Transport großer und schwerer Bauteile vo…

Kurvatur

(257 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Mod. t.t. der arch. Bauforsch.; bezeichnet wird hiermit die bei einigen dor. Ringhallentempeln seit der Mitte des 6. Jh.v.Chr. (z.B. Apollontempel von Korinthos = frühester Beleg; Aphaiatempel von Aigina; Parthenon; großer Tempel von Segesta), selten auch bei ion. Bauten (z.B. Apollontempel von Didyma) zu beobachtende Aufwölbung des Stufenbaus und - daraus resultierend - der weiteren aufgehenden Ordnung bis ins Gebälk. Das bei Vitruv (3,4,5) erwähnte Phänomen gehört, wie auch die…

Bosse

(122 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing)
[English version] Roh behauene, unfertige Außenfläche eines steinernen Werkstückes (Plastik oder Architektur). Die endgültige Gestaltung der Oberflächen erfolgte sowohl im Bauwesen als auch in der Bildhauerei als letzter Arbeitsschritt; bis dahin bildete die B. einen Schutz vor Beschädigung (Bautechnik; Bildhauertechnik). Das Stehenlassen der Bosse an Bauten kann Indiz für Unfertigkeit sein, bisweilen wurde ein “Bossenstil” in der Baukunst auch als eigenes ästhetisches Element begriffen und absich…
▲   Back to top   ▲