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Frei, Hans Wilhelm

(170 words)

Author(s): Hunsinger, George
[German Version] (Apr 29, 1922, Wrocław [Ger. Breslau], Poland – Sep 12, 1988, New Haven, CT), professor at Yale University, was the leading American expert on the theology of K. Barth and an outstanding interpreter of modern religious thought. In The Eclipse of Biblical Narrative (1974), his most important work, he argued that the modern understa…

Blood of Christ

(1,937 words)

Author(s): Breytenbach, Cilliers | Köpf, Ulrich | Hunsinger, George
[German Version] I. New Testament – II. Church History – III. Dogmatics I. New Testament 1. General: The Greek word αἷμα ( haîma, “blood”) first of all denotes the blood of humans (Mark 5:25; John 19:34) as well as of animals (Heb 9:7, 18–25). Apart from flesh (σάρξ / sárx) blood constitutes a major component of the human body. Thus the expression “flesh and blood” designates the human (Matt 16:17; 1 Cor 15:50; Gal 1:16; Eph 6:12). The blood is the origin (John 1:13), the locus of life (Matt 27:4; Lev 17:11; Wis 7:2; Jub. 6:7; Philo Spec. IV 122f.), the psyche (“soul”) and the pneuma (“spirit”) (Gen 9:4; Josephus Ant. III 260). By bleeding to death the substance of life leaves the body. Consequently the expression “shedding blood” (αἷμα έκχύννειν/ haîma ekchÿnnein or ἐκχέειν / ekchéein) means “to kill” (Matt 23:35; Acts 22:20; Rom 3:15; Rev 16:6; cf. BDAG, 22f.), and the term “blood,” therefore, is used as a designation for death (Matt 27:24f.; Rom 5:9) or killing (Matt 23:30; Re…

Sacred and Profane

(5,561 words)

Author(s): Paden, William E. | Milgrom, Jacob | Taeger, Jens-Wilhelm | Vroom, Henk M. | Hunsinger, George | Et al.
[German Version] I. Religious Studies While the sacred/profane duality has a long history, going back to the Romans, it was the emergence of an intercultural, anthropological perspective in the late 19th century that made it a significant descriptive category in comparative religious studies. In that context, the sacred/profane concept served to describe certain types of experience and behavior common to all human cultures. The anthropological interest in the sacred focused initially on early notions like taboo and mana, Oceanian terms that mean “forbidden”…