Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)" )' returned 42 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Magic, Magi

(7,505 words)

Author(s): Wiggermann, Frans (Amsterdam) | Wandrey, Irina (Berlin) | Graf, Fritz (Columbus, OH) | Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Thür, Gerhard (Graz) | Et al.
I. Ancient Orient [German version] A. General The magic of the ancient Orient and of Egypt is based on a view of the world that runs counter to that of religion. In the world-view of magic, men, gods and demons are tied to each other and to the cosmos by sympathies and antipathies, whereas in the religious world view everything is created by the gods for their own purposes; the relations between men and the cosmos are the result of deliberate actions of the gods. In the practice of religion, however, b…

Ahoros

(502 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] (ἄωρος; áōros). ‘Untimely’, used as adjective and noun, known in the magical papyri as a designation of a soul that died before its time (ἄωρος). Ahoros in this usage also appears in literary texts (Aesch. Eum. 956; Eur. Or. 1030); ahoros or synonyms (πρόμοιρος, ἀωρόμορος) are also found in grave inscriptions of all periods [1. 14; 2]. In general ahoros relates to death before puberty, marriage or childbirth ([1. 47-83]; cf. Od. 11,36-41; Verg. Aen. 6,426-29; Pl. Resp. 615c; PGM IV 2732-5). Living people could command the ahoros to carry out various tasks, includi…

Oracula Chaldaica

(463 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] The term Oracula Chaldaica describes those Greek poems in dactylic hexameters which were allegedly uttered by Hecate and possibly also other deities, either directly to a man known by the name of Julian [4] the Chaldean, who had invoked them, or via a divinely possessed medium acting for Julian. The poems were written in archaizing style which imitated both Homer and other older oracles. Although they date from the late 2nd or early 3rd cent. AD, the name Oracula Chaldaica was not…

Demons

(2,953 words)

Author(s): Maul, Stefan (Heidelberg) | Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) | Niehr, Herbert (Tübingen) | Macuch, Maria (Berlin) | Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] I. Mesopotamia Mesopotamia did not develop a generic term for demons. A large number of immortal beings was known that each had their own name and acted as servants of the gods and as enemies or helpers of humans. They did not have cults of their own. Since demons were only able to exercise their limited powers, which manifested themselves in physical and psychological illnesses, with the approval of the gods, they were part of the existing world order. Thus, in the Babylonian tale …

Iynx

(278 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
(ἴυγξ; íynx). [German version] [1] Demon related to the genesis of the world Iynx (‘sounding’, cf. ἰύζω/ iýzō) refers to 1. a bird, 2. a humming wheel used in magical rites, and 3. a demon in  theurgy who is associated with the origin of the world and mediates between humans and gods. In myth the bird is transformed from a seductive nymph, the daughter of Echo or Peitho and perhaps  Pan (Callim. Fr. 685; Phot. and Suda, s.v. I.), or from a woman who competed with the Muses in singing (Nicander in Antoninus Liberalis 9). The wheel and the bird were important in the Greek love-spell in myth…

Orphicae Lamellae

(428 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] (Orphic gold leafs). A number of Greek texts on thin gold foil from grave finds; the Latin expression has become established since [1]. A critical edition of most of the texts known until 1997 (18 in total) can be found in [2]. The texts contain instructions and information to guide the soul of the dead on its way through the underworld and to guarantee its preferential treatment by the gods of the same place. They are called 'Orphic' because early scholarship, knowing significant…

Gello

(160 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] (Γελλώ; Gellṓ) designates the spirit of a girl who died single, which kills unmarried or pregnant women and small children; it is first mentioned in Sappho (fr. 178 L.P. = 168 V.) [1]; G. is also the name of a mythological creature with these characteristics (Suda s.v.). It was still feared in the Byzantine period (Johannes Damascenus Perì Stryngôn, PG 94, 1904 C; Psellos Dihḗgesis perì Gellṓs [2]), something that has survived to the present day in rural Greece [3]. G. has often been associated with  Lamia and  Mormo, two similar spirits, and the strix. Rites to fend off G…

Gate, deities associated with

(314 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] The three most important Greek deities associated with gates (for Rome see  Ianus,  Carna) were  Hecate (and  Artemis, who was closely associated with her),  Hermes and  Hercules. Hecataea (small statues or shrines to Hecate) were to be found in front of the gates of private houses and in front of city gates (Aeschyl. TrGF 388; Aristoph. Vesp. 804, Hsch. s. v. προπύλαια). Corresponding with this is the association between Hecate and additional liminal places, particularly road-forks ( tríhodoi), which is in turn connected with her role as protector from t…

Megaera

(131 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] (Μέγαιρα/Mégaira, ‘the envious one’, Lat. Megaera). Name of one of the Erinyes ( Erinys; Apollod. 1,3f.; Cornutus 10; Verg. Aen. 12,845-847; Lucan. 1,572-577, 6,730; Stat. Theb. 1,712; more in [1. 123]), perhaps also a name for the destructive power of personified envy in general and the evil eye in particular (Orph. Lithika 224f., cf. Orph. Lithika kerygmata 2,4). A 3rd century AD altar with a votive inscription to M. has been found in Pergamum. Votive offerings may have been made with the aim of warding off envy [2]. Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) Bibliography 1 E. Wüs…

Mormo

(160 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] (Μορμώ/ Mormṓ). A female spirit, principally used to frighten children (Theocr. 15,40 with schol.; Plat. Phd. 77e; Str. 1,2,8; schol. Aristides p. 41 Dindorf = 1,5), in this role often interchangeable with Gello, Lamia [1] and strix (a nocturnal bird which sucked the blood out of children). Her other name, Mormolýkē or Mormolykía, suggests she was imagined as a wolf, though Theocr. 15,40 (with schol. ad loco) associates her with a horse and Erinna 26f. implies she could change shape. According to myth M. was a woman from Corinth who devoured at first her own…

Iphigenia

(906 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
(Ἰφιγένεια; Iphigéneia). [German version] A. Myth Daughter of  Agamemnon and  Clytaemnestra (Procl. Cypriorum enarratio, 55-62 EpGF S.32; Aesch. Ag.; but cf. Stesich. fr. 191 PMGF and Nicander fr. 58 = Antoninus Liberalis 27, where Theseus and Helena are her parents and Clytaemnestra merely adopts I.), sister of  Orestes,  Chrysothemis [2] and  Electra [4]. Although she was promised to marry Achilles [1], Agamemnon, on the advice of Calchas, sacrificed her to Artemis to allow the Greeks' departure for Troy, which had been delayed by an unnatural calm. Aulis is most commonly refer…

Underworld

(3,318 words)

Author(s): S.LU. | von Lieven, Alexandra (Berlin) | B.CH. | Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Käppel, Lutz (Kiel) | Et al.
[German version] I. Mesopotamia Myths, Epics, Prayers and Rituals of the 2nd and 1st millennia BC, in the Sumerian and Akkadian languages, describe the location and nature of the Underworld, along with the circumstances under which its inhabitants live. This domain, located beneath the surface of the earth and surrounded by the primeval ocean called Apsȗ, is known in Akkadian as erṣetu (Sumerian: ki), a term that can refer both to the surface of the earth and to the Underworld. There are other terms for certain characteristics of this region. The Underworl…

Erinys

(713 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] (Ἐρινύς; Erinýs). Etymology uncertain (Chantraine 2,371, cf. [1; 2. 83-4]). E. is already mentioned in  Linear B (KN 200 = Fp 1, 208 = V 52, cf. Fs 390; [1]) in connection with other deities such as Zeus, Athene, Paeon and Poseidon. Later, the name appears both in the singular as well as in the plural (‘Erinyes’). Mostly, the Erinyes are daughters of Night (Aesch. Eum. 69; 322 et passim) or they originate from drops of blood shed during Uranus' castration (Hes. Theog. 185), which indicates their connection with crime within a family, in particul…

Kleidouchos

(163 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] (κλειδοῦχος; kleidoûchos, ‘Holder of the keys’) referred to the person who had the keys to the house (Eur. Tro. 492), or the priest or priestess who held the keys to the temple (Aesch. Supp. 291). Some cults assigned a symbolic significance to this function (on Carian Hecate cults [1; 2]). Sometimes kleidoûchos was an epiclesis of a deity as well, in particular of Hecate in her soteriological role in the mysticism of late antiquity (such as Procl. In Platonis rem publicam vol. 2, 212,7 Kroll; Orph. H. 1,7; more in [2]). Kleidoûchos was also the Pythagorean term for the …

Dead, cult of the

(3,539 words)

Author(s): S.LU. | von Lieven, Alexandra (Berlin) | Prayon, Friedhelm (Tübingen) | Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Doubordieu, Annie (Paris) | Et al.
[German version] I. Mesopotamia The cult of the dead in Mesopotamia is documented in written as well as archaeological sources. In the written sources, the term kispum is used for the act of supplying the dead with food and drink (monthly or bimonthly). An important part of the ritual was the ‘calling of the name’ [3. 163] ─ kispum thus served to ensure not only the existence but also the identity of the dead in the  Underworld. In the absence of the cult of the dead, the Underworld changed into a dark, inhospitable place. The living also had an inter…

Theurgy

(934 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] (θεουργία/ t heourgía), from Greek 'divine' ( theîos) and 'work' ( érgon): 'divinely oriented actions'. During the first few cents. AD, there arose a number of religious movements that combined elements of Platonic philosophy, practices drawn from traditional cult, and newer doctrines that adherents claimed were revealed to them directly by the gods. One of the most influential of these movements was Theurgie, which emphasized worshipping the gods through ritual. Theurgie was said to have been founded by a certain Julian, who came to be known as 't…

Paredros, Paredroi

(710 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum) | Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
(πάρεδρος/ páredros, plural πάρεδροι/ páredroi, 'assessor' of political office-holders or deities). A. Politics [German version] 1. Athens (a) In the 5th and 4th cents. BC two paredroi were appointed each by the eponymous árchōn , the polémarchos and the basileús (see árchōn basileús) as assistants and deputies ([Aristot.] Ath. pol. 56,1). Their position had an official character, as they were subordinate to the dokimasía and they were liable to account. (b) In the 4th cent. BC a pair of paredroi for each ten eúthynoi of the Council (see eúthynai ) of the 500 were chosen from the bouleutaí

Iulianus

(4,648 words)

Author(s): Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main) | Nutton, Vivian (London) | Franke, Thomas (Bochum) | Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Montanari, Franco (Pisa) | Et al.
Epithet of many gentilicia [1]. Famous persons: the jurist Salvius I. [1]; the doctor I. [2]; the emperor I. [11], called ‘Apostata’; the bishops I. [16] of Aeclanum and I. [21] of Toledo. [German version] [1] L. Octavius Cornelius P. Salvius I. Aemilianus Roman jurist, 2nd cent. AD Jurist, born about AD 100 in North Africa, died about AD 170; he was a student of  Iavolenus [2] Priscus (Dig. 40,2,5) and the last head of the Sabinian law school (Dig. 1,2,2,53). I., whose succession of offices is preserved in the inscription from Pupput, provi…

Hecate

(1,055 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] (Ἑκάτη; Hekátē). Into the modern age, the goddess H. has been known as the mistress of ghosts, as the demonic mediator par excellence between above and below. In this function, she is closely associated with  magic in which the ‘use’ of the spirits of the dead plays an important role (Eur. Med. 397; Hor. Sat. 1,8,33). H. probably stems from Caria and came to Greece around the archaic age, from where her worship spread to the entire Graeco-Roman world. Her cult in Caria (above all in Lagina) and other p…

Nekydaimon

(367 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] (Νεκυδαίμων; Nekydaímōn). Nekydaímōn is used in magic papyri and defixiones as a technical term to describe the spirit ( daímōn; Demons) of a dead person (Greek  nékys) providing services to the living. It was primarily the spirits of people who had not received a ritual burial ( átaphoi), or who had died violently ( biaiothánatoi) or prematurely ( áhōros ) that were threatened with the fate of being forced into service as a n ekydaímōn.  (PGM V 304-369; [1. 46-63, 71-81, 100-123; 3. 273]). The word nekydaímon is not found other than in papyri and defixiones, but they are…

Megaira

(119 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[English version] (Μέγαιρα, “die Neidische”; lat. Megaera). Name einer der Erinyen (Erinys; Apollod. 1,3f.; Cornutus 10; Verg. Aen. 12,845-847; Lucan. 1,572-577, 6,730; Stat. Theb. 1,712; weiteres in [1. 123]), vielleicht auch ein Name für die zerstörerische Macht des personifizierten Neids im allg. sowie des bösen Blicks im bes. (Orph. Lithika 224f., vgl. Orph. Lithika kerygmata 2,4). Ein Altar aus dem 3. Jh.n.Chr. mit einer Weihinschr. für M. ist in Pergamon gefunden worden; Weihegaben wurden vielleicht mit der Absicht dargebracht, Neid abzuwenden [2]. Johnston, Sarah Ile…

Demonology

(1,854 words)

Author(s): Baltes, Matthias (Münster) | Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Habermehl, Peter (Berlin)
[German version] A. Definition Demonology is the philosophical doctrine of the daímones ( Demons) ─ intermediate beings between gods and men ─ that the Platonic Academy first systematically developed subsequent to the problem posed by the Socratic daimónion (δαιμόνιον). Baltes, Matthias (Münster) [German version] B. Preplatonic It is not possible to reconstruct a systematic Pre-platonic demonology although later philosophers, e.g., Aetius (1,8,2), Aristoxenus (fr. 34), Aristotle (fr. 192 Rose) and Plutarch (De Is. et Os. 360e), believed th…

Iphinoe

(96 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[German version] (Ἰφινόη; Iphinóē). Name of various heroines in myth and cult: one was a daughter of the Megarian king  Alcathous [1] at whose grave girls offered libations and locks of hair before marriage (Paus. 1,43,3f.), another was a daughter of king  Proetus (Apollod. 2,29) who died when Melampus tried to cure her and her sisters of madness. She may have been honoured with rites during the Argive Agrigonia. (Hsch. s.v. Agrania). Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) Bibliography W. Burkert, Homo Necans, 1972, 189-200 K. Dowden, Death and the Maiden. Girls' Initiation Rites in…

Lamia

(900 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim) | Wirbelauer, Eckhard (Freiburg)
[German version] [1] Female spirit (Λάμια; Lámia). A female spirit who specialized in attacking children (Duris, FGrH 76 F 17; Diod. Sic. 20,41,3-5; Str. 1,2,8; [1. ch. 5]). In this function, L. was often confused with Gello, Mormo and the Strix. In later sources, L. also seduces and destroys attractive men (Philostr. VA 4,25; cf. Apul. Met. 1,17). Her name is etymologically related to laimós (‘maw’), which is an expression of her all-consuming hunger (cf. Hor. Ars P. 340; Hom. Od. 10,81-117 on Lamus, the king of the cannibalistic Laestrygones; lamía is also a designation for ‘shark’…

Hekate

(982 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[English version] (Ἑκάτη). Bis in die Neuzeit ist die Göttin H. als Gespensterherrin, als dämonische Mittlerin par excellence zwischen Unten und Oben bekannt. In dieser Funktion ist sie eng mit der Magie verbunden, in der die “Benutzung” von Totengeistern eine wichtige Rolle spielt (Eur. Med. 397; Hor. sat. 1,8,33). H. stammt wohl aus Karien und kam etwa in archa. Zeit nach Griechenland, von wo aus sich ihre Verehrung in der ganzen griech.-röm. Welt ausbreitete. Ihr Kult in Karien (vor allem Lagin…

Nekydaimon

(322 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[English version] (Νεκυδαίμων). N. wird in den Zauberpapyri und defixiones als t.t. zur Bezeichnung des Geistes ( daímōn; Dämonen) eines Verstorbenen (griech. nékys) verwendet, der den Lebenden Dienste erweist. Vor allem den Geistern von Menschen, die keine rituelle Bestattung erhalten hatten ( átaphoi), die gewaltsam ( biaiothánatoi) oder vorzeitig ( áhōros ) gestorben waren, drohte das Schicksal, zum Dienst als n. gezwungen zu werden (PGM V 304-369; [1. 46-63, 71-81, 100-123; 3. 273]). Das Wort n. findet sich außerhalb von Papyri und defixiones nicht, doch spielen rituell…

Lamia

(786 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Kramolisch, Herwig (Eppelheim) | Wirbelauer, Eckhard (Freiburg)
[English version] [1] Weibl. Geist (Λάμια). Ein weiblicher Geist, der auf den Angriff auf Kinder spezialisiert ist (Duris, FGrH 76 F 17; Diod. 20,41,3-5; Strab. 1,2,8; [1. Kap. 5]). In dieser Funktion ist L. oft mit Gello, Mormo und der Strix verwechselt worden. In späteren Quellen verführt und vernichtet L. auch attraktive Männer (Philostr. Ap. 4,25; vgl. Apul. met. 1,17). Ihr Name ist etym. verwandt mit laimós (“Schlund”), was ihren alles verschlingenden Hunger zum Ausdruck bringt (vgl. Hor. ars 340; Hom. Od. 10,81-117 zu Lamos, dem König der kannibalischen Laistrygonen; l. ist auc…

Dämonen

(2,882 words)

Author(s): Maul, Stefan (Heidelberg) | Jansen-Winkeln, Karl (Berlin) | Niehr, Herbert (Tübingen) | Macuch, Maria (Berlin) | Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[English version] I. Mesopotamien Ein übergeordneter Begriff für D. wurde in Mesopotamien nicht entwickelt. Bekannt ist eine Vielzahl unsterblicher Wesen, die jeweils einen eigenen Namen tragen und als Diener der Götter und Feinde oder Helfer der Menschen auftraten. Gegenstand eines eigenen Kultes waren sie nicht. Da D. ihre beschränkte Macht, die sich etwa in Krankheiten physischer und psychischer Art manifestierte, nur mit Billigung der Götter ausüben konnten, waren sie Teil der Weltordnung. So wu…

Iynx

(274 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Haase, Mareile (Berlin)
(ἴυγξ). [English version] [1] Dämon im Zusammenhang mit der Weltentstehung Mit i. (“tönend”, vgl. ἰύζω) werden 1. ein Vogel, 2. ein summendes, in mag. Riten verwendetes Rad und 3., in der Theurgie, ein Dämon bezeichnet, der mit der Weltentstehung verbunden ist und zw. Menschen und Göttern vermittelt. Im Mythos wird der Vogel aus einer verführerischen Nymphe verwandelt, der Tochter von Echo oder Peitho und vielleicht Pan (Kall. fr. 685; Phot. und Suda, s.v. I.), oder aus einer Frau, die mit den Musen im Singen wetteiferte (Nikandros bei Antoninus Liberalis 9). Rad und Vogel waren wich…

Iphinoe

(94 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[English version] (Ἰφινόη). Name verschiedener Heroinen in Mythos und Kult: zum einen eine Tochter des megarischen Königs Alkathoos [1], an dessen Grab Mädchen vor ihrer Hochzeit Trankopfer und Haarlocken opferten (Paus. 1,43,3f.); zum anderen die Tochter des Königs Proitos (Apollod. 2,29), die bei einem Versuch des Melampus, sie und ihre Schwestern vom Wahnsinn zu heilen, stirbt. Vielleicht wurde sie mit Riten während der argiv. Agrigonia geehrt (Hesych. s.v. Agrania). Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) Bibliography W. Burkert, Homo Necans, 1972, 189-200  K. Dowden, Death and…

Kleiduchos

(144 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[English version] (κλειδοῦχος, “Schlüsselhalter/-in”) bezeichnete die Person, welche über die Hausschlüssel (Eur. Tro. 492), oder den Priester bzw. die Priesterin, welche über die Tempelschlüssel verfügte (Aischyl. Suppl. 291); in einigen Kulten hatte dies neben der prakt. auch eine symbol. Bed. (zu karischen Hekatekulten [1; 2]). Manchmal war K. auch Epiklese einer Gottheit, vor allem von Hekate in ihrer soteriologischen Rolle im spätant. Mystizismus (etwa Prokl. In Platonis rem publicam Bd. 2, 212,7 Kroll; Orph. h. 1,7; mehr bei [2]). K. war auch die Bezeichnung, die die…

Dämonologie

(1,898 words)

Author(s): Baltes, Matthias (Münster) | Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Habermehl, Peter (Berlin)
[English version] A. Definition D. ist die philos. Lehre von den daímones (Dämonen), den Zwischenwesen zwischen Göttern und Menschen, die im Anschluß an die Problematik des Sokratischen daimónion (δαιμόνιον) zuerst systematisch in der Platonischen Akademie entwickelt wurde. Baltes, Matthias (Münster) [English version] B. Vorplatonisch Es ist nicht möglich, eine systematische vorplatonische D. zu rekonstruieren, obwohl spätere Philosophen, wie z.B. Aetius (1,8,2), Aristoxenus (fr. 34), Aristoteles (fr. 192 Rose) und Plutarch (Is. 360e) gla…

Paredros, Paredroi

(680 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum) | Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
(πάρεδρος, Pl. πάρεδροι, “Beisitzer” von polit. Funktionsträgern oder Gottheiten). A. Politik [English version] 1. Athen (a) Je zwei p. wurden im 5. und 4. Jh.v.Chr. vom eponymen árchōn , vom polémarchos und vom basileús (s. árchōn basileús) als Assistenten und Stellvertreter benannt ([Aristot.] Ath. pol. 56,1). Ihre Position hatte Amtscharakter, da sie der dokimasía unterlagen und rechenschaftspflichtig waren. (b) Je zwei p. wurden im 4. Jh.v.Chr. für jeden der zehn eúthynoi des Rates (s. eúthynai ) der 500 aus den buleutaí (“Ratsmitgliedern”) ausgelost ([Aristot.] Ath. …

Iulianus/-os

(4,346 words)

Author(s): Giaro, Tomasz (Frankfurt/Main) | Nutton, Vivian (London) | Franke, Thomas (Bochum) | Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Montanari, Franco (Pisa) | Et al.
Beinamen bei vielen Gentilicia [1]. Bekannte Personen: der Jurist Salvius I. [1], der Arzt I. [2], der Kaiser I. [11], gen. “Apostata”, die Bischöfe I. [16] von Aeclanum und I. [21] von Toledo. [English version] [1] L. Octavius Cornelius P. Salvius I. Aemilianus röm. Jurist, 2. Jh. Jurist, geb. um 100 n.Chr. in Nordafrika, gest. um 170 n.Chr., war ein Schüler des Iavolenus [2] Priscus (Dig. 40,2,5) und der letzte Vorsteher der sabinianischen Rechtsschule (Dig. 1,2,2,53). I., dessen Ämterfolge die Inschr. aus Pupput/Prov. Africa (CIL VIII 24…

Erinys

(670 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[English version] (Ἐρινύς). Etym. unsicher (Chantraine 2,371, vgl. [1; 2. 83-4]). E. wird schon in Linear B erwähnt (KN 200 = Fp 1, 208 = V 52, vgl. Fs 390; [1]), im Zusammenhang mit anderen Gottheiten wie Zeus, Athene, Paion und Poseidon. Später erscheint der Name sowohl im Sg. als auch im Pl. (“Erinyen”). Meist sind die Erinyen Töchter der Nacht (Aischyl. Eum. 69; 322 et passim) oder sie entstanden aus Blutstropfen bei Uranos' Kastration (Hes. theog. 185), was ihre Verbindung mit Familienverbr…

Gello

(146 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[English version] (Γελλώ) bezeichnet den Geist eines ledig gestorbenen Mädchens, der unverheiratete oder schwangere Frauen und Kleinkinder tötet; erstmals wird sie bei Sappho genannt (fr. 178 L.P. = 168 V.) [1]; G. ist ebenfalls Name einer myth. Gestalt mit diesen Zügen (Suda s.v.). Sie wurde noch in byz. Zeit gefürchtet (Johannes Damaskenos Perí Stryngṓn, PG 94, 1904 C; Psellos Dihḗgesis perí Gellṓs [2]), was im ländlichen Griechenland bis heute überdauert [3]. G. wurde oft mit Lamia und Mormo, zwei ähnlichen Geistern, und der Strix in Zusammenhang gebra…

Iphigeneia

(881 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
(Ἰφιγένεια). [English version] A. Mythos Tochter von Agamemnon und Klytaimestra (Prokl. Cypriorum enarratio, 55-62 EpGF S.32; Aischyl. Ag.; vgl. aber Stesich. fr. 191 PMGF und Nikandros fr. 58 = Antoninus Liberalis 27, wo Theseus und Helena ihre Eltern sind und I. lediglich von Klytaimestra adoptiert wird), Schwester von Orestes, Chrysothemis [2] und Elektra [4]. Obwohl sie dem Achilleus [1] zur Ehe versprochen ist, wird sie von Agamemnon auf Rat des Kalchas der Artemis geopfert, um die durch eine unnatürliche Windstille verzögerte Abfahrt der Griechen nach Troia zu ermöglichen. Al…

Magie, Magier

(6,634 words)

Author(s): Wiggermann, Frans (Amsterdam) | Wandrey, Irina (Berlin) | Graf, Fritz (Princeton) | Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Thür, Gerhard (Graz) | Et al.
I. Alter Orient [English version] A. Allgemein Altoriental. und äg. M. beruht auf einem Weltbild, das der Religion entgegengesetzt ist. Im mag. Weltbild sind Menschen, Götter und Dämonen durch Sympathien und Antipathien miteinander und mit dem Kosmos verbunden, im rel. Weltbild wird alles durch die Götter zu ihrem eigenen Nutzen gestaltet; die Beziehungen zw. Mensch und Kosmos sind Folge bewußter Maßnahmen der Götter. In der rel. Praktik jedoch sind beide Weltbilder integriert und komplementär. Das rel…

Ahoros

(477 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[English version] (ἄωρος). “Unzeitig”, als Adj. und Subst. gebraucht, bekannt aus den magischen Papyri als Bezeichnung einer Seele, die vor ihrer Zeit (ἄωρος) gestorben ist. A. taucht in dieser Verwendung auch in lit. Texten auf (Aischyl. Eum. 956; Eur. Or. 1030); A. oder Syn. (πρόμοιρος, ἀωρόμορος) finden sich auch auf Grabinschr. aller Perioden [1. 14; 2]. Im Allg. ist mit A. der Tod vor Pubertät, Heirat oder Geburt gemeint ([1. 47-83]; vgl. Od. 11,36-41; Verg. Aen. 6,426-29; Plat. rep. 615c; PG…

Mormo

(155 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[English version] (Μορμώ). Ein weiblicher Geist, der vornehmlich als Kinderschreck fungierte (Theokr. 15,40 mit schol.; Plat. Phaid. 77e; Strab. 1,2,8; schol. Aristeides p. 41 Dindorf = 1,5), in dieser Rolle oft mit Gello, Lamia [1] und strix (Nachtvogel, der Kindern das Blut aussaugte) verwechselt. Ihr anderer Name, Mormolýkē oder Mormolykía, legt nahe, daß sie als Wolf vorgestellt wurde, obwohl Theokr. 15,40 (mit schol. z.St.) sie mit einem Pferd assoziiert und Erinna 26f. impliziert, daß sie ihre Gestalt wechseln konnte. Nach dem Mythos ist M. eine Frau aus Korinth, die…

Oracula Chaldaica

(444 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[English version] Mit dem Begriff O.Ch. werden griech. Gedichte in daktylischen Hexametern bezeichnet, welche angeblich von Hekate und vielleicht auch anderen Gottheiten entweder direkt zu einer unter dem Namen Iulianos [4] der Chaldäer bekannten Figur gesprochen werden, der sie angerufen hatte, oder über ein von Iulianos eingesetztes göttlich besessenes Medium. Die Gedichte sind in archaisierender Sprache verfaßt, die sowohl Homer als auch ältere Orakel nachahmt. Obwohl sie aus dem späten 2. oder…

Orphicae Lamellae

(407 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton)
[English version] (orphische Goldblättchen). Eine Reihe von griech. Texten auf dünner Goldfolie aus Gräberfunden; der lat. Ausdruck hat sich seit [1] eingebürgert. Eine kritische Ed. der meisten bis 1997 bekannten Texte (18 Stück) findet sich in [2]. Die Texte geben Anweisungen und Informationen, welche die Seele des Toten auf ihrem Weg durch die Unterwelt leiten und sicherstellen sollen, daß sie von den Unterweltsgöttern bevorzugt behandelt wird. “Orphisch” heißen sie, weil die frühere Forsch. au…
▲   Back to top   ▲