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Discipleship, Christian

(4,235 words)

Author(s): Sim, David | Köpf, Ulrich | Ulrich, Hans G.
[German Version] I. New Testament – II. Church History – III. Ethics I. New Testament 1. Discipleship of Jesus in the Gospels An important aspect of the description of Jesus' activity in the Gospels is his call to discipleship. This call is issued unconditionally and requires an immediate decision. When the disciples hear Jesus' invitation to follow him, they obey at once and follow him (ἀκολουϑεῖν/ akoloutheín; Mark 1:16–20 parr.; 2:13–14 parr.; cf. Luke 5:1–11; John 1:35–51). Others, however,…

Patrocinia

(1,075 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] Latin patrocinium denotes a proprietary relationship, usually established by consecration, and the consequent protective function of a patron (usually a saint) with respect to a church or altar, a country, a city or bishopric, a group (social class, noble family, profession, guild, confraternity, university, monastery, religious congregation, or the like), or an individual. In return for protection, the patron is honored by the faithful in a wide variety of liturgical and paraliturgical forms. ¶ The ancient Roman term patronus first appears as a term for a …

Observants

(332 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] From the late 14th century, reforming groups or tendencies within monasticism (III, 4.b), especially in the mendicant orders and most especially among the Franciscans, were called observants ( observantes, fratres de observantia etc.). In internal debates ¶ about the right way of life, they opposed easing of the rule and other kinds of adaptation that had crept in (Conventuals), and advocated strict following of the rules as rigorously interpreted, together with other prescriptions ( observantia regularis etc., Observance). In this, restoration of the vita commu…

Baur, Ferdinand Christian

(1,665 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (Jun 21, 1792, Schmiden, near Stuttgart – Dec 1, 1860, Tübingen). I. Life – II. Work – III. Influence I. Life The eldest son of a Württemberg pastor, Baur studied theology at Tübingen (1809–1814) and served briefly as a curate and Repetent (tutor). In 1817, he became professor at the Minor Seminary in Blaubeuren, where he taught ancient languages, laying the groundwork for his general erudition. Here, in 1821, he married Emilie Becher (18…

Assisi

(184 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] is an Umbrian city on the western foothills of Monte Subasio. It was a Roman municipium and the home of the poet Propertius. Since the early 4th century it has been the seat of a bishopric (city patron: the martyred bishop Rufinus). In the early Middle Ages it belonged to the Lombard Duchy of Spoleto, was under Hohenstaufen dominion from 1172/…

Barefoot Friars

(94 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (Discalceates). The term for religious people who, as an expression of penitence and in reference to Jesus' missionary instructions, wear no shoes or only sandals: in the Middle Ages, these were at first the Camaldolese and especially the Franciscans, who came to be known as Barefoot Friars in Germany; in the modern period, especially the Passionists. Going barefoot is also characteristic for reform movements in some of the older orders since the 16th century (Carmelites Augustinian Hermits, Trinitarians, Mercedarians). Ulrich Köpf Bibliography E. Pacho, “Scalz…

Theology, History/Historiography of

(3,497 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] I. History The notion of a history of theology is a product of the modern era, but the roots of a historical perspective can be traced back to the Early Church. One is the doxography of heresy (the earliest extant being Irenaeus’s Adversus haereses), which was a foundation for the history of dogma (Dogma, History of); another was literary history (Literature, History of: V, 2.a), beginning with Jerome’s De viris illustribus (392). But it was not until the age of Protestant orthodoxy (II, 2) that scholars began to reflect on writing a history of theo…

Pallium

(145 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] Pallium, a circular stole worn on the shoulders over the mass robe, made of white wool decorated with black silk crosses, with a short strip with a black end hanging over the chest and the back (Vestments, Liturgical). It presumably developed from the sash worn by Roman officials in late imperial times, and from the early 6th century the pope has been entitled to wear this liturgical vestment. From the 9th century he bestowed it on archbishops, who, however, were allowed to wear i…

Mysticism

(17,207 words)

Author(s): Brück, Michael v. | Gordon, Richard L. | Herrmann, Klaus | Dan, Joseph | Köpf, Ulrich | Et al.
[German Version] I. The Concept – II. Religious Studies – III. History – IV. Philosophy of Religion – V. Practical Theology – VI. Islamic Mysticism – VII. Hindu Mysticism – VIII. Taoist Mysticism I. The Concept The concept of mysticism is closely linked to the development of the history of religion in Europe and the term must not be taken and applied uncritically as a general term for a phenomenologically determined group of phenomena in other religions (see also II, 3 below). Attempts at definition are either phenomenolog…

Roger Bacon

(453 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (c. 1214/1220, England – c. 1292). After studying arts in Oxford and perhaps in Paris (M.A. c. 1236/1240), Bacon taught in the Paris faculty of arts until about 1247. It is uncertain whether he then returned to England, and where he entered the Franciscan order (probably before 1256). After theological studies (in Oxford?) he was again in Paris around 1257. ¶ Here, c. 1263, he found a patron in Cardinal Gui Foucois (Guy Foulques the Fat), later Pope Clement IV (1265–1268), to whom he sent several works on request (including the Opus maius, the Opus minus, and perhaps the Opus t…

Monasteries

(3,085 words)

Author(s): Freiberger, Oliver | Köpf, Ulrich | Mürmel, Heinz | Kalb, Herbert
[German Version] I. Comparative Religion – II. Christianity – III. Buddhism – IV. Monastic Law I. Comparative Religion The term monastery (or cloister) derives from the Christian tradition, where it denotes the living and working quarters, relatively secluded from the outside world, of a monastic community leading some type of ascetic life (Asceticism; see II below). In the broader context of other religions, the term is also tied to the context of monasticism. When certain social structures in non-Christian reli…

Poverty

(3,579 words)

Author(s): Klinger, Elmar | Ebach, Jürgen | Stegemann, Wolfgang | Köpf, Ulrich | Reinert, Benedikt
[German Version] I. Concept Poverty is a major source of distress. It is a historical circumstance, not a natural condition. We speak of relative poverty when someone’s income is below the mean, absolute poverty when it is below subsistence level. From the perspective of the Bible and contemporary theology, poverty means deprivation but also marginalization, incapacitation, and disfranchisement. Wealth means affluence but also power, exploitation, and oppression (see III and V below). Poverty is a life and death matter. Elmar Klinger Bibliography E. Klinger, Armut, 1990 E.-U. Hu…

Peter Lombard

(359 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (1095/1100, near Novara, Lombardy – Jul 21/22, 1160, Paris). After studying in northern Italy and Reims, Peter came to Paris c. 1135 as an outsider; by 1145 he was already one of the most important teachers in the cathedral school. On Jul 28, 1159, he was consecrated bishop of Paris, but he was unable to distinguish himself in that office. In his years of teaching, he produced glosses (Glossa ordinaria) on the Psalms (PL 191, 55–1296) and the Pauline Epistles, also called the magna (or maior) glossatura (PL 191, 1297–1696; 192, 9–520), as well as four books of Sententiae (crit…

Waldenses

(2,367 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] I. Middle Ages Waldenses (Valdesi), supporters of the townsman Waldo from Lyon, made their first historical appearance in 1179 at the Third Lateran Council, where they vainly requested permission to preach freely. In 1180, Waldo and his companions ( fratres) committed themselves to an orthodox creed at a synod in Lyon and pledged to lead a life according to the counsels of perfection. By doing so, the community of the “Poor of Lyon” attained public visibility. In analogy to other religious movements of the 12th century…

Teachers

(2,641 words)

Author(s): Rau, Eckhard | Köpf, Ulrich | Lämmermann, Godwin
[German Version] I. Earliest Christianity According to CIJ 2, 1266 and passim, religious teachers known as διδάσκαλος/ didáskalos or רב/ rab (addressed as: διδάσκαλε/ didáskale; רבי/ rabbi; rabbi) existed in Palestine prior to 70 ce (Zimmermann). All four Gospels portray Jesus as a teacher with a circle of disciples who were also responsible for the preservation of his teaching. Q (Logia/Sayings Source/Q), furthermore, emphasizes the teacher’s superiority over the disciple (Luke 6:40 par.). Mark has Jesus being addressed as a διδάσκαλε or ῥαββί/ rhabbí who, in a singular show …

Papacy

(20,018 words)

Author(s): Brennecke, Hanns Christof | Zimmermann, Harald | Mörschel, Tobias | Wassilowsky, Günther | Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] I. Early Church – II. Middle Ages and Reformation – III. Modern Period and Today – IV. Chronological List of the Popes I. Early Church 1. Definition. If papacy is defined as the claim (based on Matt 16:16–19; 28:20; Luke 22:31f.; John 21:15–19) of the bishops of Rome as successors and heirs to Peter to leadership along with jurisdictional and magisterial primacy (I) within the universal church, papacy in the strict sense dates only from the Middle Ages in the Latin West. In the Early Church, the point at iss…

Effective History/Reception History

(5,400 words)

Author(s): Steinmann, Michael | Schüle, Andreas | Rösel, Martin | Luz, Ulrich | Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] I. Philosophy – II. Fundamental Theology – III. Applications I. Philosophy The concept of effective history ( Wirkungsgeschichte) takes on philosophical significance in the hermeneutics of H.G. Gadamer, where it represents the attempt to clarify the fundamental requirement for understanding texts and make this understanding transparent in its own historically conditioned context. …

Reformed Colleges in Germany

(481 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] One of the central demands of the Wittenberg and Swiss Reformation was thorough theological education of all future clergy. In Lutheran territories, Reformed theological faculties in ¶ the existing universities served this function, but initially in Reformed territories such institutions were largely lacking. Only three existing comprehensive universities intermittently offered Reformed instruction: Heidelberg from 1559 to 1578 and from 1583 to 1662, Marburg between 1605 and 1624 and again after 1653, Frank…

Middle Ages

(4,250 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] I. The Term – II. Assessment and Study – III. Definition – IV. Characteristics – V. Early, High, and Late Middle Ages I. The Term French moyen âge has been used for a historical period since 1572, English Middle Age(s) since 1611 and Middle Time(s) since 1612. The German word Mittelalter had already been used by the Swiss historian Aegidius Tschudi ( mittel alters) in 1538, but it did not reappear in this sense (in contrast to “middle age”) until 1786; at the beginning of the 19th century, it finally prevailed over the more common 18th-century expressions mittlere Zeit(e…

Alexander of Hales

(279 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (c. 1185, Hales, England – Aug 21, 1245, Paris). After studying the arts and theology, Alexander taught in the Parisian theological faculty from the early 1220s, but maintained close relations with home. In 1229, he moved with the striking Parisian professors and students to Angers and brought forward their demands to the Roman Curia in 1230/1231. When …

Physis/Natura

(1,828 words)

Author(s): Hornauer, Holger | Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] I. Religious Studies 1. The Greek Φύσις/ Phýsis is an abstract personification and an effective divine power. It is not restricted to any particular area of responsibility, and has no cult of its own or special iconography, with two exceptions: the votive relief of Archelaus of Priene (so-called “Apotheosis of Homer,” c. 120–130 bce), and the mosaic of Merida (2nd cent. ce; natura is between heaven, the sea, the Euphrates, the Nile, Tellus etc.). 2. In pre-Socratic natural philosophy (see also Nature), Physis may be personified and thought of as divine power (…

Renaissance

(9,034 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich | Cancik, Hubert | Buttler, Karen | Imorde, Joseph | Mohr, Hubert
[German Version] I. Concept The French term “Renaissance,” which was also borrowed by German and English, belongs to the large group of organic metaphors applied to historical occurrences. Used from the 19th century in sole reference to animal/human life and understood in the sense of “rebirth,” it is assigned in recent research (since Jost Trier) more appropriately to the botanical sphere and explained as “renewed growth,” i.e. as a renewed sprouting of shoots ¶ from felled trees and bushes. Pre-Christian Latin already employed renasci (from nasci, “to be born, to become, to ar…

Waldo, Peter

(178 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (Valdez; died c. 1205/1218). The scanty tradition concerning Waldo permits only a few safe statements about him. A baptismal name ( Petrus) is first mentioned in the second half of the 14th century. A prosperous citizen of Lyon, around 1176/1177 he appears to have been converted to an apostolic life by the legend of Alexius or biblical texts translated into the vernacular. Whether he was attracted primarily by the ideal of poverty or a desire to preach is disputed. After making provision for his wife …

Degrees, Academic

(1,180 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] Academic degrees came into existence in the context of medieval education. Even before universities were established, teachers were generally given the title Magister; while the usual title in the stronghold of legal studies at Bologna was Doctor, which also was often applied to the teachers of the Early Church ( Doctores ecclesiae ). At the universities, which arose c. 1200, the master's degree was the highest degree granted by all the faculties, with a distinction between someone who was merely qualified to teach and a Magister actu regens (a professor engaged in …

Mendicant Orders

(462 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] The mendicant orders are religious communities in the West in which not only do the individual members live without personal possessions, but the community itself also forgoes ownership of property and regular income (Poverty). They sustain themselves on what they get from simple work, contributions, and begging. The mendicant orders originated in the early 13th century in conjunction with the religious poverty movement: the Dominicans, a clerical order of priests engaged in preac…

Seal/Stamp

(1,059 words)

Author(s): Uehlinger, Christoph | Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] I. Archaeology Seals are attested in the ancient Near East since the pre-pottery Neolithic (c. 7000 bce), initially in the form of simple round or oval disks or theriomorphic stamps. Beginning in the late 4th millennium (Susa, Uruk), we also find cylinder seals (Good Shepherd: I, fig.). The latter were in use until the end of the first millennium bce, but they are also found in Egypt and the eastern Mediterranean region. In cultures where papyrus or leather was the commonest writing material, smaller stamp seals were preferred. In Egypt c. 2300 bce, carved stamp seals ca…

Eudo of Stella

(96 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (Éon d'Étoile; died after 1148), possibly of noble birth, was a charismatic hermit and itinerant preacher of little education. After several years of preaching in Brittany and Gascony, where he attracted many followers, he was arraigned before the Council of Reims in 1148 and condemned to seclusion in the monastery of St. Denis in Paris. It is unclear what led him to assert that he was God's son, the future judge of the living and dead. Ulrich Köpf Bibliography J.C. Cassard, “Eon d'Étoile, ermite et hérésiarque breton,” MSHAB 57, 1980, 171–198.

Henry the Lion

(239 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (1129/1130 – Aug 6, 1195, Braunschweig), duke of Saxony and Bavaria, son of the Guelph Henry X the Proud, and Gertrud, daughter of Emperor Lothar III, cousin of Frederick Barbarossa. His second marriage was with Mathilde, daughter of King Henry II of England. Henry the Lion was a ruler with great self-confidence and a pronounced drive toward power and possessions. Conquests in the Slavic northeast, territorial expansion, and the founding of dioceses (Oldenburg/Lübeck, Ratzeburg, S…

Conventuals

(331 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] 1. Those who belong to a convent (Lat. conventus), i.e. all the full members of a religious community at a specific location. 2. In the context of a particular monastic way of life, and especially among the mendicant orders, “conventuals” refers to that group or tendency within the order which continues to follow the “old observance” (usually in a previously mitigated form) in the midst of internal disputes over the proper observance of the rule, and which accordingly …

Gottfried of Auxerre

(184 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (Gottfried of Clairvaux; c. 1114/20, Auxerre – after 1188, Hautecombe). As a student of Abelard, attracted to the Cistercians in ¶ 1140 by the Paris sermon of Bernard of Clairvaux, De conversione. He was a monk in Clairvaux, Bernard's secretary until his death in 1153, abbot of Igny from 1156 and of Clairvaux from 1162 to 1165. After his forced resignation, he was a monk in Cîteaux, abbot of Fossanova near Rome beginning in 1170 and of Hautecombe (Savoie) from 1176 to 1188. Gottfried collected Bernard's letters and material for his Vita prima, which he initiated and book…

Ambrosians

(128 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] The Ambrosians are a religious community first mentioned in 1375 in a bull of Gregory XI; they are traced to three nobles from Milan. The monasteries they established lived independently according to the Augustinian rule (Augustine, Rule of) and followed the Ambrosian rite in worship; they were united by Eugene IV with other groups as the Congregatio fratrum S. Ambrosii ad nemus Mediolanensis in 1441. After varying fortunes – especially in the schism of monasteries which adopted the Roman rite, which associated in 1496 with the Apostolic Brothers as the Congregatio S. …

Bridge-building Brotherhoods

(73 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (Fratres Pontis). Brotherhoods for building and maintaining bridges over rivers and the hospitals, chapels and cemeteries associated with them. Active from the 12th on into the 15th cen-turies, especially in southern France (Rhône valley); supposedly founded here by St. Bénézet (1184/ 85), to whom the bridge of Avignon is attributed. Ulrich Köpf Bibliography P. Péano, “Pontieri,” DIP VII, 1983, 85–92 idem, “Benedetto di Hermillon,” DIP I, 1974, 1359f.

Wendelin, Saint

(102 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (died c. 617 [?]) is said to have lived as a hermit in the hill country between the Hunsrück and the Palatine Forest in the time of Bishop Magnerich of Trier (died after 587). The 10th-century calendar of Stavelot Abbey is the earliest evidence of cultic veneration of his grave at the site later named Sankt Wendel; its late Gothic hall church (consecrated in 1360) was built to enshrine his relics. Wendelin has been venerated since the late Middle Ages as the patron saint of herdsmen and cattle. Ulrich Köpf Bibliography A. Selzer, St. Wendelin, 1936, 21962 (Ger.).

Cross/Crucifixion

(4,480 words)

Author(s): Sundermeier, Theo | Taeger, Jens-Wilhelm | Köpf, Ulrich | Slenczka, Notger | Stock, Alex
[German Version] I. The Cross in Non-Christian Religions – II. Crucifixion in Antiquity – III. The Crucifixion of Christ – IV. Church History – V. Dogmatic Theology – VI. The Cross in Modern Art I. The Cross in Non-Christian Religions From prehistoric times to the present, various forms of the cross have appeared in many non-Christian cultures and religions, used both as a religious symbol and as an ornamental design (the boundaries are fluent). It is a primal human symbol. As such it is polysemous and has …

Theodore of Canterbury (Saint)/Theodore of Tarsus

(256 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (602, Tarsus – Sep 19, 690, Canterbury [?]). When Wighard, who had been appointed to succeed Archbishop Deusdedit of Canterbury, died in Rome in 667, Abbot Hadrian of Hiridanum Abbey near Naples suggested the learned Greek monk Theodore of Tarsus; Pope Vitalinus consecrated him as archbishop in 668. He was living at the time in a community of Cilician monks in the Roman abbey of St. Anastasius ad Aquas Salvias (later Tre Fontane) on the southern edge of the city. There is no relia…

Monastic Theology

(759 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] The concept of a théologie monastique was introduced by J. Leclercq, in a monograph on Peter the Venerable, abbot of Cluny ( Pierre le Vénérable, 1946); he subsequently developed it in studies of the monastic literature of the High Middle Ages, especially the work of Bernard of Clairvaux ( L'amour des lettres et le désir de Dieu, 1957; ET: The Love of Learning and the Desire for God, 1961). Since then it has proved its value as a key concept for understanding the theology of Bernard and medieval theology in general. It has long since been accepte…

Wilhelmites

(290 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] The Wilhelmite order goes back to a hermitage (Monasticism: III) founded in Tuscany in the mid-12th century. Its founder is said to have been a French noble named Wilhelm, a former soldier who settled near Pisa in 1145 after several pilgrimages; later he moved to the mountain valley of Malavalle, near Siena, where he lived a strictly ascetic life as a hermit with a single companion (later joined by a second). After his death on Feb 10, 1157, a hermitage grew up at his burial site;…

Geography

(827 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] I. History of the Discipline – II. Church History I. History of the Discipline Geography has come a long way from its beginnings in the mythical worldview (ANE creation accounts, early Greek philosophical speculation) and in the pragmatic exploration of the world (travel reports of merchants) to its development as an exact science. In antiquity, it was understood as a comprehensive lore of the earth and its inhabitants. The earliest accounts took the form of descriptions of coasts (Periplus et al.), which were soon joined by geographic and ethnographic excu…

Lay Abbot

(106 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] A lay abbot in the narrow sense, is a layman who is entrusted with the conduct and use of a monastery without being a member of its convent or even a monk. In the Frankish Empire of the 9th and 10th centuries and its successor states, members of the nobility were particularly frequently vested with this function. In a secondary meaning, lay abbot also designates the clerical holder of a commendam, who does not have the status of a monk (frequent from the High Middle Ages to the early modern period). Ulrich Köpf Bibliography F.J. Felten, Äbte und Laienäbte im Frankenreich, 1980.

Ebeling, Gerhard

(1,181 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich | Lange, Dietz
[German Version] I. Life – II. Church Historian – III. Systematic Theologian Jul 6, 1912, Berlin-Steglitz – Sep 30, 2001, Zollikerberg/Zürich), Protestant German theologian. I. Life Ebeling began his theological studies in 1930; after studying at Marburg, Berlin, and Zürich, he passed his first theological examination for the examination office of the Confessing Church in Berlin. He prepared for pastoral ministry under …

Edifying Literature

(3,117 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich | Weismayer, Josef | Beutel, Albrecht
[German Version] I. To the Reformation – II. Modern Era – III. Present I. To the Reformation The term “edifying literature” (or “devotional literature”) embraces all Christian literature that is not liturgical, juristic, merely informative, or scholarly (history, theology) but is meant to edify and encourage piety and Christian conduct. But the boundaries distinguishing e…

Ficino, Marsilio

(391 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (Oct 19, 1433, Figline Valdarno, Italy – Oct 1, 1499, Careggi, Italy). Ficino was the son of the personal physician of Cosimo de' Medici; the latter supported Ficino and prompted him to change his course of studies from medicine to philosophy. He acquired an extremely thorough knowledge of Greek and produced annotated translations of esp. Plato (1463–1469), Plotinus (1484–1486), and a series of other neo-Platonic authors. In Florence he founded a Platonic Academy (I, 5) in which h…

Liechtenstein

(293 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] The principality of Liechtenstein is a microstate (160 km2) between the Swiss cantons of Sankt Gallen and Grisons (Graubünden) to the west and the Austrian state of Vorarlberg to the east. It is a hereditary constitutional monarchy with a population of 35,300 (2007), 80% Catholic, 7.4% Protestant (1996). Rulers of Liechtenstein are first mentioned in the 12th century, with two lines possessing lands in Styria and Moravia. When the Styrian line died out in 1619, the Moravian lord of Nikols…

Relics

(5,513 words)

Author(s): Felber, Anneliese | Köpf, Ulrich | Plank, Peter | Hafner, Johann Ev. | Mohr, Hubert
[German Version] I. Religious Studies Relics are the remains (Lat. reliquiae) of individuals endowed with power, such as warriors, chiefs, sorcerers, heroes, prophets, martyrs, and saints – their bodies, their clothing, or objects they have used. Veneration of relics reflects the belief that these forces continue beyond the grave; the intent is to benefit from this power or blessing by erecting structures over the grave, lighting candles or leaving flowers, processions, touching or kissing, or burial near…

Controversial Theology

(1,053 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] is a branch of theology that judges differences between various Christian Churches from a polemical and argumentative point of view rather than analyzing them from a historically critical perspective. The “controversy” involved relates both to the object and the method of this discipline. Theological positions are discussed when they become significant in disturbing or dividing the church community, and not so much as contributions to an open scholarly debate. I. Although the term controversial theology did not become common until the 20th century, …

Peter Cantor

(242 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (Petrus; first half of the 12th cent., Hosdenc, near Beauvais – 1197, Cistercian abbey of Longpont, near Soissons). Sometime before 1173, after studying at the cathedral school in Reims, he began teaching at the cathedral school in Paris as a canon; in 1183 he was appointed to the post of cantor. He refused his election as bishop of Paris in 1196. In 1197 he was elected dean of the cathedral chapter of Reims, but died on his journey from Paris. Numerous works, some still unpublished, bear witness to his teaching activity: glosses on the Old and New Testaments; Distinctiones or S…

Cathedral Schools

(471 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] were educational originally institutions for training clergy, administered by the episcopal curia. In the Early Church, learned bishops (preeminently Augustine) already gave instruction to their clergy. From the second Council of Toledo (527/531) onward, the Church repeatedly urged the establishment of episcopal schools; in 789, they were ¶ enjoined by Charlemagne, and in 1076 by Gregory VII. Nevertheless, down to the Reformation numerous councils deplored the educational level of the clergy – a sign of the great dispari…

Reform, Idea of

(2,727 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] In classical Latin, the verb reformare and the associated noun reformatio already denoted a transformation for the better: restoration of an earlier human condition, since lost (morality e.g. Pliny the Younger Panegyricus 53.1: “corruptos depravatosque mores . . . reformare et corrigere”; bodily health e.g. Theodorus Priscianus Euproiston 1.38: “oculorum aciem reformare”), or physical objects (e.g. Solinus, Collectanea rerum memorabilium 40.5: “templum reformare”) or improvement without regard to the past (e.g. Sen. Ep. 58.26: “reformatio morum”; Ep. 94.5…

Jesus Christ

(19,624 words)

Author(s): Roloff, Jürgen | Pokorný, Petr | Köpf, Ulrich | Lathrop, Gordon W. | Krötke, Wolf | Et al.
[German Version] I. Name and Titles – II. Jesus Christ in the History of Christianity – III. Jesus Christ in Other Religions – IV. Jesus Christ in Jewish Perspective – V. Jesus Christ in Islamic Perspective – VI. Jesus Christ in Art I. Name and Titles 1. Jesus of Nazareth a. Terminology The appellation Jesus Christ signals a significant tension regarding the figure in question. Although generally understood as a double name, it originated as a fusion of two heterogeneous elements: the theophoric personal name Joshua/Jeshua (Heb. “the Lord help…

Recluses/Hermits

(442 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] Recluses or hermits are men and women who do penance by shutting themselves (or having themselves shut) into a cell, either for a specific period (usually at the beginning of their lives as ascetics) or for the rest of their lives. This extreme form of asceticism surfaced in the Early Church in all regions of the East where there were monastic settlements (e.g. in Egypt, John of Lycopolis; esp. common in Syria) and came to the West in the 6th century, but it reached its climax in …

Vikings

(188 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] The Vikings were marauding seafarers from Scandinavia, who plagued large sections of Europe from ¶ the 8th century to the 11th century. Swedes descended on Novgorod and Kiev via the Gulf of Finland, advancing as far as the Black Sea (Varangians). Norwegians conquered Scotland and the northern and eastern parts of Ireland, settled Iceland, and sailed as far as Greenland, Newfoundland, and Nova Scotia. Danes settled between the mouths of the Oder and Vistula and landed on the southern and eastern …

Remigius of Auxerre (Saint)

(119 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] (after 841 – May 2, probably 908, Paris), a monk from the monastery of St. Germain in Auxerre, where he succeeded his teacher Heiric ( Heiricus). Remigius was involved in the renewal of the school of Reims around 893 and taught in Paris from 900 onward. He authored more than 20 works that were widely read in the Middle Ages, although most of them have never been printed: commentaries on ancient and early medieval grammarians and poets, on Genesis and the Psalms, and on Boethius’s De consolatione philosophiae and Opuscula sacra; he also wrote an exposition of the mass. Ulrich Kö…

Libri sententiarum

(992 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] Authoritative dicta with significant content (Gk γνώμη/ gnṓmē [earliest: Sophoc. Ajax 1091] alongside more specialized terms; Lat. sententia [since Cicero]) were already in use in pre-Christian times in literary and rhetorical contexts; later they were collected for more convenient use ( gnomology, similar to anthology [Florilegium]). Examples are Μενάνδρου γνώμαι μονόστιχοι/ Menándrou gnṓmai monóstichoi ¶ (probably begun in the 2nd cent. bce; continued into the Byzantine period) and Σέξτου γνώμαι/ Séxtou gnṓmai (c. 200 ce). During the Trinitarian contr…

Literature, History of

(11,666 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich | Utzschneider, Helmut | Reiser, Marius | Hezser, Catherine | Heinzmann, Michael
[German Version] I. The Concept and its Problems – II. Old Testament – III. New Testament – IV. Judaism – V. Church History I. The Concept and its Problems Since the emergence of historical consciousness in the late 18th and early 19th century, literary historiography has attempted to present literary phenomena not simply as a sequential chronological or lexical (alphabetical) list but in their internal, substantial coherence and its historical development. The notion of literary history goes back to antiquity, but to …

Quaestio

(422 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] A true (as opposed to “rhetorical”) question (Gk ζήτημα/ zḗtēma, πρόβλημα/ próblēma, ἀπορία/ aporía, Lat. quaestio), seeking an answer that will solve a problem, is a fundamental tool for rational argumentation. It was used already by the ancient Greeks (beginning with the questions of Socrates in the dialogues of Plato) and rabbinic Judaism (in give and take between teacher and student). Formulation of questions became common early on in the theology of the Early Church (reaching a high point in Augustine, e.g. De diversis quaestionibus ad Simplicianum; Quaestione…

Oxford University

(900 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] The city is first mentioned in 912. It was founded in the Anglo-Saxon period and walled by the Normans, and lies at the intersection of important routes. As early as the 12th century there were schools for the artes liberales , law and theology, from which the university developed by the beginning of the 13th century. Following a conflict with the townspeople, most masters and students left Oxford in 1209; some of them founded Cambridge University. When others returned to Oxford in 1214 the university…

Carmelites

(510 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] The Carmelite Order goes back to a community of occidental hermits on Mount Carmel, who were granted a rule by the patriarch of Jerusalem in 1210. It obligated them to a strict contemplative life. The spirituality of the community, led by a prior, was marked by anachoretic traditions, the example of the prophet Elijah, and veneration of the Virgin Mary. In 1240, the Carmelites fled before the growing threat of the Saracens into their European homelands, where …

Ireland

(2,091 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich | Richter, Michael
[German Version] I. General Facts – II. Christianity I. General Facts Lying west of Great Britain in the North Atlantic, Ireland belongs to the British Isles and covers an area of 84,421 km2. Its (esp. in the west) strongly cleft coastline has a total length of 3,173 km. Numerous small offshore islands and reefs played an important role in the history of Ireland as places of refuge, bridgeheads, and the like. The island's interior is relatively flat with a general altitude of approx. 60–120 m above sea level. Mountains, whic…

Pico della Mirandola

(799 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] 1. Giovanni (Feb 24, 1463, Mirandola near Modena – Nov 17, 1494, Florence), son of the count of Mirandola. From 1477, he studied canon law, artes liberales, philosophy, and literature, especially in Bologna, Ferrara, Padua, Paris, and Perugia. In addition to Greek, he learned Hebrew and Arabic. He paid several visits to Florence, where he made friends with Lorenzo de’ Medici and his circle, especially with M. Ficino, Angelo Poliziano (1454–1494), and Girolamo Benivieni (1453–1542). …

Universities

(5,637 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich | vom Bruch, Rüdiger | Roxborogh, John
[German Version] I. History 1. Middle Ages and Reformation. The university, the most important academic institution devoted to teach-¶ ing (Education/Formation) and research today, is a creation of the medieval West. Its appearance marked a deep caesura in the history of Western science, especially in the history of theology (Theology, History/Historiography of). The multiplicity of institutions involved in acquiring and transmitting knowledge (monasteries, cathedral schools, monastery schools, schools run by inde…

Disputation

(1,448 words)

Author(s): Dan, Joseph | Köpf, Ulrich | van Ess, Josef
[German Version] I. Judaism – II. Christianity – III. Islam I. Judaism Talmudic tradition includes several examples of disputations between Jewish scholars and pagan philosophers or Roman emperors, dealing mainly with the questions of divine unity, the creation and the role of Israel ( b. Sanh. 91a–b; ' Abod. Zar. 10a–11a, etc.). Disputations with representatives of Islam and, especially, of the Christian religion became a central subject in the historical and apologetical literature (…

Summa theologiae

(401 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[German Version] In the 12th century, a scholarly work briefly summarizing the totality of important knowledge in a particular field (Robert of Melun: singulorum brevis comprehensio) came to be called a Summa (later also Summula). Various disciplines were represented: Summa grammaticae/grammaticalis; Summa super Priscianum; Summa dictaminis/artis notariae; Summa logicae ( Summulae dialectices/logicales/logicae); Summa de modis significandi; Summa philosophiae; Summula philosophiae naturalis; Summa de anima, etc. Compendia of civil and canon law were also called Summae…

Tanchelm

(143 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] (gest.1115 Antwerpen). Asketischer Wanderprediger, vermutlich Laie, zeitweilig in der Umgebung Graf Roberts II. von Flandern. 1112 soll er sich in Rom um eine Lösung der Inseln an der Scheldemündung (Seeland) aus dem Bistum Utrecht und um ihre Unterstellung unter das Bistum Thérouanne (Erzbistum Reims) bemüht haben. Auf der Heimreise vom Erzbf. von Köln verhaftet, wurde er vom Utrechter Domklerus der Ketzerei beschuldigt. Zu den klischeehaften Vorwürfen gehört die Ablehnung des K…

Oxford

(825 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] Oxford, Universität. In dem erstmals 912 erwähnten, in angelsächsischer Zeit gegründeten, von den Normannen mit Mauern umgebenen Ort am Schnittpunkt wichtiger Verkehrswege gab es schon im 12.Jh. Schulen für die artes liberales, Recht und Theol., aus denen sich an der Wende zum 13.Jh. die U. entwickelte. Nach einem Konflikt mit der Stadtgemeinde verließen 1209 die meisten Magister und Studenten O.; ein Teil von ihnen gründete die U. Cambridge. Mit der Rückkehr eines anderen Teils n…

Stadt

(3,602 words)

Author(s): Dangschat, Jens S. | Köpf, Ulrich | Grünberg, Wolfgang
[English Version] I. SoziologischS. sind nach landläufiger Vorstellung v.a. eine dichte und heterogene Ansammlung von Gebäuden unterschiedlicher Nutzung, versehen mit spezifischen Rechten und immer auch Marktort. Im Verständnis der »eur. S.« ist sie v.a. aber auch die Arena der Stadtgesellschaft. Die Soziologie betrachtet die Entwicklung städtischer Gesellschaften seit etwa 150 Jahren, weil S. Orte wirtschaftlichen Wachstums, sozialer Vielfalt, gesellschaftlicher Innovationen und von Konflikten au…

Petrus Comestor

(205 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] (Manducator; frühes 12.Jh. Troyes – 1178/79 Paris). Nach Studien in Troyes (hier seit 1147 Dekan der Kathedrale und Kanoniker des Stifts St. Loup), Tours und Paris wurde er 1159 Nachfolger seines Lehrers Petrus Lombardus an der Domschule von Paris, 1168 Kanzler von Notre-Dame. In seinen letzten Jahren lebte er im Chorherrenstift St. Victor. Aus seiner Lehrtätigkeit sind zahlreiche – meist ungedr. – Werke erhalten: Glossen (Glossa ordinaria) zu den Evv., zum Ps.-Komm. und (erstmal…

Reformgedanke

(2,448 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] . Bereits im antiken Latein bez. das Verb reformare und das zugehörige Subst. reformatio eine positiv gewertete Umgestaltung: sowohl die Wiederherstellung eines früheren, inzw. verlorengegangenen Zustandes von Menschen (moralisch z.B. Plinius d.J., Panegyricus 53,1: corruptos depravatosque mores […] reformare et corrigere; körperlich z.B. Theodorus Priscianus, Euporiston 1,38: oculorum aciem reformare) oder von Dingen (z.B. Solinus, Collectanea rerum memorabilium, 40,5: templum r…

Roger Bacon

(399 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] (ca.1214/1220 England – ca.1292). Nach dem Studium der artes in Oxford und vielleicht in Paris (ca.1236/1240 M.A.) lehrte R. bis etwa 1247 an der Pariser Artistenfakultät. Es ist unsicher, ob er dann nach England zurückkehrte und wo er (wohl vor 1256) in den Franziskanerorden eintrat. Nach theol. Studien (in Oxford?) war er um 1257 wieder in Paris. Hier gewann er um 1263 in Kardinal Gui Foucois (Guy de Foulques u. ä.), dem späteren Papst Clemens IV. (1265–1268), einen Gönner, dem…

Robert

(163 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] von Arbrissel (um 1145 Arbrissel bei Rennes – 25.2.1116 Priorat Orsan-en-Berry). Der Sohn eines Erbpfarrers von Arbrissel trat nach Studien in Paris als Kleriker in den Dienst Bf. Silvesters von Rennes. Nach erneuten Studien in Angers (seit 1078) erlebte er die Bekehrung zu asketischem Leben, zog sich als Einsiedler in den Wald von Craon (Anjou) zurück und gründete hier 1095 ein Kollegiatstift, verließ es aber wieder, um (seit 1096 mit Erlaubnis Papst Urbans II.) als Bußprediger d…

Renaissance

(7,676 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich | Cancik, Hubert | Buttler, Karen | Imorde, Joseph | Mohr, Hubert
[English Version] I. Zum Begriff Der franz., auch ins Dt. und Engl. übernommene Begriff R. gehört zur großen Gruppe der organischen Metaphern für gesch. Vorgänge. Seit dem 19.Jh. lange Zeit allein auf tierisch-menschliches Leben bezogen und als »Wiedergeburt« verstanden, wird er in der neueren Forschung (seit Jost Trier) angemessener dem pflanzlichen Bereich zugeordnet und als »Wiederwuchs«, d.h. als Wiederausschlagen von Trieben aus abgehauenen Bäumen und Sträuchern, erklärt. Bereits im vorchristl.…

Suburbikarische Bistümer

(158 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] heißen heute sieben im Umkreis (suburbium) Roms liegende Diözesen, die meist eine wechselvolle Gesch. hatten: Albano, Frascati (an Stelle von Tusculum, das als Nachfolger von Labicum 1058–1197 faktisch und bis 1537 nominell Bischofssitz war), Ostia, Palestrina, Porto (durch Calixtus II. mit Santa Rufina [Silva Candida] vereinigt), Sabina (durch Eingliederung des Bistums Nomentum in das Bistum Forum Novum entstanden, 1925 mit Poggio Mirteto vereinigt), Velletri (1150 mit Ostia ver…

Wilhelm von Newburgh

(122 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] (Guilelmus Parvus; um 1136 Bridlington, Yorkshire – 1198 Newburgh, ebd.). Als Kanoniker des 1145 gegründeten Augustiner-Chorherrenstifts Newburgh (Augustiner-Chorherren) vf. W. neben Predigten eine mariologische Hhld-Auslegung (Explanatio Sacri Epithalamii in Matrem Sponsi, hg. von J.C. Gorman, 1960) und eine engl. Gesch. (Historia Rerum Anglicarum, hg. von R. Howlett, 2 Bde., 1884/85), die nüchtern, genau und ausgewogen die Zeit von 1066–1198 (d.h. die Regierungszeit Heinrichs II. und Richards I. Löwenherz von England) darstellt. Ulrich Köpf Bib…

Wilhelmina

(298 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] von Böhmen (von Mailand; gest.1278/1281 Mailand). Einzige Quelle sind die Akten des 1300 postum gegen W. und ihre Anhänger geführten Inquisitionsprozesses, aus denen ihre hochadlige Herkunft aus Böhmen hervorzugehen scheint. Ihr Leben vor ihrer Ankunft in Mailand (zw. 1260 und 1270) ist unbekannt; doch soll sie einen Sohn gehabt haben. In Mailand, das nicht nur durch Streit mit anderen oberital. Städten und interne Parteikämpfe, sondern auch durch jahrelange Konflikte mit der röm.…

Wirkungsgeschichte/Rezeptionsgeschichte

(4,777 words)

Author(s): Steinmann, Michael | Schüle, Andreas | Rösel, Martin | Luz, Ulrich | Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] I. Philosophisch Der Begriff einer Wirkungsgesch. (Wg.) erlangt in der Hermeneutik (: IV.) Hans-Georg Gadamers eine philos. Bedeutung. Er steht dort für den Versuch, die grundsätzliche Bedingung des Verstehens überlieferter Texte zu klären und das Verstehen in der ihm eigenen Geschichtsgebundenheit durchsichtig zu machen. Demnach geht es bei der Wg. nicht mehr um die philol. oder hist. Aufgabe, die Fortwirkung eines Textes zu untersuchen. Vielmehr soll sich das Verstehen selbst al…

Robert Kilwardby

(206 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] (gest.10.9.1279 in Viterbo). Erstes sicheres Datum aus seinem Leben ist seine Wahl zum Provinzialmagister der engl. Dominikaner im September 1261. Von hier aus lassen sich frühere Daten erschließen: in den 30er Jahren Studium an der Pariser Artistenfakultät, ca.1237 M.A., Lehrtätigkeit in Paris bis Mitte der 40er Jahre, dann Rückkehr nach England und Eintritt in den Predigerorden, Studium der Theol. in Oxford (ca.1252–1254 Sentenzenvorlesung), 1254 Magister regens der Theol. Seit…

Nachfolge Christi

(3,699 words)

Author(s): Sim, David | Köpf, Ulrich | Ulrich, Hans G.
[English Version] I. Neues Testament 1.Nachfolge Jesu in den Evangelien Ein wichtiger Aspekt der Darstellung des Wirkens Jesu in den Evv. ist sein Ruf zur N. Dieser Ruf ergeht bedingungslos und fordert unmittelbare Entscheidung. Wenn die Jünger Jesu Einladung, ihm zu folgen, vernehmen, gehorchen sie sofort und folgen ihm (α᾿κολουϑει˜n̆/akolouthei´n; Mk 1,16–20 parr.; 2,13–14 parr.; vgl. Lk 5,1–11; Joh 1,35–51). Andere verkennen jedoch den bedingungslosen und unmittelbaren Charakter seines Rufes und verpassen so die Gelegenheit, Jesus zu folg…

Quaestio

(363 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] . Die echte, nicht »rhetorische«, sondern auf eine problemlösende Antwort abzielende Frage (griech. ζη´τημα/zē´tēma, προ´βλημα/pro´blēma, α᾿πορι´α/apori´a, lat. quaestio) ist ein elementares Mittel rationaler Argumentation. Sie begegnet schon in vorchristl. Zeit bei den Griechen (seit dem sokratischen Fragen des platonischen Dialogs) wie im rabb. Judentum (im Gespräch zw. Lehrer und Schüler). Das Formulieren von Fragen wurde schon früh in der altkirchl. Theol. üblich (erster Höhepunkt bei Au…

Subiaco

(178 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] Subiaco, Ort in Latium, im Anienetal östlich von Rom. Hier soll sich Benedikt von Nursia zunächst als Eremit in einer Höhle (Sacro Speco), dann mit Gefährten in Räumen einer ehem. Villa Kaiser Neros (Kloster San Clemente) niedergelassen haben. In der Folgezeit soll er zehn weitere Klöster gegründet haben, bevor er sich um 529 nach Monte Cassino begab. Heute bestehen noch zwei von ihnen: San Benedetto (Sacro Speco) und – tiefer gelegen – Santa Scholastica (urspr. San Silvestro), d…

Reichtum

(2,869 words)

Author(s): Gräb-Schmidt, Elisabeth | Liwak, Rüdiger | Riches, John K. | Köpf, Ulrich | Reinert, Benedikt
[English Version] I. Zum BegriffDer Begriff R. entstammt dem Wortfeld: Reich, Imperium, Gewalt, Herrschaft, Herrlichkeit. Von daher hat er die Bedeutung der Fülle der irdischen Güter (Gut), die solche Macht verleiht, sodann auch Fülle, Überfluß an etwas überhaupt. Man muß unterscheiden zw. einem allg. ökonomischen Sinn und einem weiten, übertragenen Sinn von R. Allg. meint er Besitz, Habe, die Summe verfügbarer Güter und Werte, die den zur Befriedigung der Bedürfnisse notwendig erachteten Bedarf we…

Sentenzenwerke

(862 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] . Sätze von inhaltlicher Bedeutung und autoritativem Charakter (griech. γn̆ω´μη/gnō´mē [seit Sophoc. Aias 1091] neben spezielleren Begriffen; lat. sententia [seit Cicero]) wurden schon in vorchristl. Zeit in lit.-rhetorischer Funktion verwendet und später zu bequemerem Gebrauch gesammelt (Gnomologion, verwandt mit Anthologia [Florilegium], z.B. Μεn̆α´n̆δρου γn̆ω˜μαι μοn̆ο´στιχοι/Menándrou gnō´mai monóstichoi [wohl im 2.Jh. v.Chr. begonnen und bis in byz. Zeit fortgeführt] oder Σε´ξτου γn̆ω˜μαι/Séxtou gnō´mai [um 200 n.Chr.]). In den trin…

Siegel

(878 words)

Author(s): Uehlinger, Christoph | Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] I. Archäologisch S. sind im AO seit dem präkeramischen Neolithikum (um 7000 v.Chr.) bezeugt, zuerst als einfache, runde oder ovale Platten oder als Tierfigur gestaltete Stempel, ab dem späten 4.Jt. (Susa, Uruk) auch walzenförmig als sog. Roll- oder Zylindersiegel (Guter Hirte: I., s. dort Abb.). Letztere hielten sich bis zur Zeitenwende, sind aber auch in Ägypten und im östlichen Mittelmeerraum belegt. In Kulturen mit Papyrus oder Leder als gebräuchlichsten Schriftträgern bevorzug…

Valdes

(142 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] (gest. ca.1205/1218). Die spärliche Überlieferung erlaubt nur wenige sichere Aussagen über V.; ein Taufname (Petrus) wird nicht vor der 2. Hälfte des 14.Jh. genannt. Der wohlhabende Bürger aus Lyon scheint ca.1176/77 durch die Alexius-Legende oder in die Volkssprache übers. Bibeltexte zu einem apostolischen Leben bekehrt worden zu sein. Ob dabei dem Armutsideal oder dem Wunsch nach Predigttätigkeit Priorität zukommt, ist umstritten. Nach Versorgung seiner Frau und seiner beiden T…

Patrozinien

(938 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] . Patrozinium ist das in der Regel durch eine Weihehandlung begründete geistl. Eigentums- und Herrschaftsverhältnis sowie die daraus folgende Schutzfunktion eines Patrons (meist eines Heiligen) über eine Kirche oder einen Altar, ein Land, eine Stadt oder ein Bistum, eine Personengruppe (sozialer Stand, adelige Familie, Beruf, Zunft, Bruderschaft, Universität, Kloster, Orden u. ä.) oder über eine einzelne Person. Als Gegenleistung für seinen Schutz wird dem Patron durch die Gläubi…

Sakramente

(9,159 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich | Nocke, Franz-Josef | Felmy, Karl Christian | Kandler, Karl-Hermann | Busch, Eberhard | Et al.
[English Version] I. Kirchengeschichtlich Der Begriff S. hat im christl. Sprachgebrauch eine doppelte Bedeutung: eine weite, die dem ntl. Begriff μυστη´ριοn̆/mystē´rion (»Geheimnis«) entspricht und sich als Bez. von Glaubensgeheimnissen allg. behauptet hat, und eine engere im Sinne bestimmter gottesdienstlicher Handlungen, die dem Gläubigen Anteil an der von Christus bewirkten heilbringenden Gnade geben. Während die ma. Schultheol. des Abendlandes das engere Verständnis der S. in wachsender Präzisierung und Differ…

Observanz

(431 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] . I. Der Begriff observantia bez. im klassischen Latein die rücksichtsvolle Verehrung von Mitmenschen, bes. von solchen, die uns an Alter, Weisheit und Würde überragen (Cic., De inventione 2,66.161), in der kaiserzeitlichen Latinität zudem die Beachtung von Bräuchen und Gesetzen (zur Verwandtschaft mit religio vgl.2Makk 6,11 Vulgata). Seit dem Früh-MA wurde der Begriff v.a. auf ein als Befolgung göttlicher Gebote verstandenes rel. Verhalten angewandt: einerseits allg. auf die Einh…

Physis/Natura

(1,635 words)

Author(s): Hornauer, Holger | Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] I. Religionsgeschichtlich 1. griech. Φυ´σις/Phy´sis (Ph.) als Abstraktpersonifikation und wirkende göttliche Kraft, ohne speziellen Zuständigkeitsbereich, ohne eigenen Kult und bes. Ikonographie (zwei Ausnahmen: Votivrelief des Archelaos von Priene [sog. »Apotheose des Homer«; um 130–120 v.Chr.] und Mosaik von Merida [2.Jh. n.Chr.]: »N.« (N.) zw. Himmel, Meer, Euphrat, Nil, Tellus u.a.). 2. In der vorsokratischen Naturphilosophie (s.a. Natur) kann Ph. personifiziert und als göttliche Macht gedacht werden (vgl. Heraklit [DK 22 B…

Waldenser

(2,006 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] I. Mittelalter Valdesi, d.h. Anhänger des Bürgers Valdes von Lyon, treten erstmals auf dem III. Laterankonzil 1179 ins Licht der Gesch.; dort baten sie vergeblich um Erlaubnis zu freier Predigt. 1180 beschworen Valdes und seine Gefährten (fratres) auf einer Synode in Lyon ein orth. Glaubensbekenntnis und verpflichteten sich zu einem Leben nach den Evangelischen Räten. Damit hatte sich die Gemeinschaft der »Armen von Lyon« öfftl. vorgestellt, die – wie andere rel. Bewegungen des 12…

Theodor

(240 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] von Canterbury (602 Tarsus – 19.9.690 Canterbury [?]). Als der zum Nachfolger von Erzbf. Deusdedit von Canterbury bestimmte Wighard 667 in Rom gestorben war, weihte Papst Vitalinus 668 auf Vorschlag Hadrians (des Abts von Kloster Hiridanum bei Neapel) den gelehrten griech. Mönch Th. von Tarsus zu diesem Amt. Th. lebte damals in einer Gemeinschaft kilikischer Mönche im röm. Kloster St. Anastasius ad Aquas Salvias (später: Tre Fontane) am Südrand der Stadt. Über sein früheres Leben …

Theologiegeschichte/Theologiegeschichtsschreibung

(3,072 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] I. Zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte Das Konzept einer Theologiegesch. (Thg.) ist zwar erst in der Neuzeit entstanden; Wurzeln der theologiegesch. Betrachtungsweise lassen sich aber in die Alte Kirche zurückverfolgen. Eine von ihnen ist die auch für die Dogmengeschichte grundlegende Doxographie von Häresien (ältestes erhaltenes Werk: Iren.haer.), eine andere die altkirchl. Literaturgeschichte/Literaturgeschichtsschreibung (: V., 2., a) seit Hier.vir.ill. (392). Doch erst im Zeitalter der…

Wilhelmiten.

(244 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] Der Orden der W. geht auf eine Mitte des 12.Jh. in der Toskana entstandene Eremitengemeinschaft (Mönchtum: III.) zurück. Ihr Gründer soll ein franz. Adliger Wilhelm gewesen sein, der nach einem militärischen Leben und wiederholten Wallfahrten 1145 zunächst in der Nähe von Pisa, dann im Bergtal von Malavalle bei Siena mit einem, später zwei Gefährten als Einsiedler in strengster Askese lebte. Nach seinem Tod am 10.2.1157 entstand an seinem Grab eine Eremitengemeinschaft, die nach …

Wilhelm

(209 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] von Hirsau (1026 Bayern – 5.7.1091 Hirsau). Von seinen adligen Eltern als Oblate (: I.) dem Benediktinerkloster St.Emmeram in Regensburg übergeben, wurde W. hier durch Otloh von St.Emmeram unterrichtet. Noch in Regensburg vf. er zwei Schriften zum Quadrivium in Dialogform: »De astronomia« und »De musica«. 1069 als Abt nach Hirsau berufen (Weihe 1071), reformierte er das Kloster zunächst nach dem Vorbild von St.Emmeram, das zum Reformkreis von Gorze gehörte, seit 1076 aber unter de…

Wikinger

(164 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] heißen die räuberischen Seefahrer aus Skandinavien, die vom 8. – 11.Jh. weite Teile Europas heimsuchten. Schweden drangen über den Finnischen Meerbusen, Novgorod und Kiev bis zum Schwarzen Meer vor (Waräger). Norweger eroberten v.a. Schottland und den Norden und Osten Irlands, besiedelten Island und fuhren bis Grönland, Neufundland und Neuschottland. Dänen setzten sich zw. Oder- und Weichselmündung fest und landeten im Süden und Osten Englands sowie an der Mündung von Rhein, Sche…

Zisterzienser/Zisterzienserinnen

(1,886 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] I. Anfänge Der erste Orden in der Gesch. des christl. Mönchtums (:III., 3., e) entstand dadurch, daß von dem burgundischen Benediktinerkloster (Benediktiner) Novum monasterium (seit 1119 Cistercium, franz. Cîteaux; davon die Selbstbez. Cistercienses) aus innerhalb weniger Jahre vier Tochterklöster gegründet wurden (»Primarabteien«: 1113 La Ferté, 1114 Pontigny, 1115 Clairvaux und Morimond), die untereinander und zus. mit den später von ihnen ausgegangenen Tochtergründungen einen dauerhaften Verband bildeten. Das Novum monasterium war 1098 ca…

Petrus Cantor

(202 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] (1. Hälfte 12.Jh. Hosdenc bei Beauvais – 1197 Zisterzienserabtei Longpont bei Soissons). Nach Studien an der Domschule von Reims vor 1173 Kanoniker und Magister, seit 1183 auch Cantor an Notre-Dame von Paris. Die Wahl zum Bf. von Paris 1196 nahm P. nicht an. 1197 zum Dekan des Domkapitels von Reims gewählt, starb er auf der Reise dorthin. Von seiner Lehrtätigkeit zeugen zahlreiche, z.T. noch ungedruckte Werke: Glossen zum AT und NT; »Distinctiones« oder »Summa Abel« (Lexikon bibl…

Scholastik

(2,722 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] I. Zu Begriff und Wertung Das Subst. »Sch.« wird seit dem Aufkommen einer hist. Erforschung des MA im 19.Jh. als Sammelbegriff für eine bestimmte Art wiss. Arbeitens (bes. in Philosophie [: II.] und Theol. des MA) gebraucht. Das zugrundeliegende Adj. »scholastisch« (sch.) hat eine bis zu Aristoteles (pol., e.N.) zurückreichende Gesch. Die für den modernen Gebrauch von Sch. entscheidende Konzentration von griech. σχολαστικο´ς/lat. scholasticus auf den Bereich von Unterricht und Wiss. (»zur Schule gehörend«, »gebildet« u. ä.) vollzog sich s…

Observanten

(290 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] . Als O. (observantes, fratres de observantia u. ä.) werden seit dem späten 14.Jh. jene reformwilligen Gruppen oder Richtungen im Mönchtum (: III.,4., b), v.a. in den Bettelorden und hier wieder bes. bei den Franziskanern, bez., die sich in internen Auseinandersetzungen um die rechte Lebensform gegen eingetretene Regelmilderungen und andere Arten der Anpassung (Konventualen) wandten und die strikte Befolgung der rigoros ausgelegten Regeln und anderer Vorschriften forderten (obser…

Passionsfrömmigkeit

(1,372 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] ist eine auf Passion und Kreuzestod Jesu (Passion/Passionsüberlieferung/Passionsgeschichte) ausgerichtete Gestalt christl. Frömmigkeit. Die Erinnerung an den Ausgang des Lebens Jesu war in der christl. Gemeinde immer gegenwärtig – trotz aller Kritik durch Juden und Heiden (1Kor 1,23), die einerseits die christl. Auffassung des Kreuzes (Kreuz/Kreuz Christi) als Siegeszeichen förderte und andererseits eine bildliche Darstellung der Kreuzigung Jesu bis ins frühe 5.Jh. verhinderte. I…

Theologia deutsch

(359 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] . Anonymer Traktat aus dem späten 14.Jh., in acht ma. Hsn. überliefert. Den ersten Druck veranstaltete Luther 1516 nach einer (verlorenen) frgm. (WA 1,152f.: »Eyn geystlich edles Buchleynn«), den zweiten 1518 nach einer (ebenfalls verlorenen) vollständigen Hs. (ebd. 375–379: »Eyn deutsch Theologia«). Seit dem Nachdr. Augsburg 1518 (»Theologia Teütsch«) hat sich der Titel »Th. d.« eingebürgert. Der erste moderne Druck erschien 1843 nach einer ehemals Bronnbacher Hs., deren Prolog …

Pallium

(127 words)

Author(s): Köpf, Ulrich
[English Version] . Über dem Meßgewand getragene, auf den Schultern liegende ringförmige Stola aus weißer, mit schwarzen Seidenkreuzen besetzter Wolle, von der auf Brust und Rücken jeweils ein kurzer Streifen mit schwarzem Endstück herabhängt (Gewänder, liturgische). Der wohl aus der Schärpe spätkaiserzeitlicher röm. Beamter entwickelte liturgische Ornat steht seit dem frühen 6.Jh. dem Papst zu. Dieser verleiht das P. seit dem 9.Jh. an Erzbischöfe, die es aber nur an bestimmten Tagen beim Pontifik…

Reliquien/Reliquienverehrung

(4,677 words)

Author(s): Felber, Anneliese | Köpf, Ulrich | Plank, Peter | Hafner, Johann Ev. | Mohr, Hubert
[English Version] I. Religionswissenschaftlich R. bez. die Überreste (lat. reliquiae, »Zurückgebliebenes«) kraftgeladener Menschen (Krieger, Häuptlinge, Zauberer, Heroen, Propheten, Märtyrer, Heilige [Heilige/Heiligenverehrung]), ihrer Körper, Kleidungsstücke und Gebrauchsgegenstände. Ihre Verehrung gründet auf dem Glauben, daß diese Kräfte über das Grab hinaus dauerhaft wirksam sind, mit dem Ziel, dieser Macht oder des Segens teilhaftig zu werden durch Errichten von Gebäuden über dem Grab, Aufstel…
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