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Athenian League (Second)

(475 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (4th cent. BC). The  Delian League had broken up in 404 at the end of the Peloponnesian War. One could remember the power which Athens had had over its allies, but Sparta's behaviour with respect to the Greeks in the early 4th cent. also led to dissatisfaction. In the King's Peace of 386, the Greeks in Asia Minor were given over to the Persians and all other Greeks were declared independent. In 384, Athens formed, explicitly in the context of this peace, an alliance with Chios (IG II2 34 = Tod 118). In 378, Athens established, after the liberation of Thebes from Spa…

Epimachia

(105 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)

States, confederation of

(621 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] In Greece federal states were regional units composed of separate poleis (Polis) and organised in such a way that at any rate foreign policy was in the hands of the federal organisation (Synhedrion), but the individual poleis retained their own citizenship and a greater degree of autonomy than was enjoyed by each of the demes (Demos [2]) of Attica. 'Tribal states' in the less urbanised parts of Greece were similar, with a federal organisation and smaller local units which had a degree of autonomy: as poleis were established these tended to develop into federal sta…

Polis

(1,781 words)

Author(s): Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum) | Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
(πόλις, πτόλις/ pólis, ptólis; pl. πόλεις/ póleis; 'city state'). [German version] I. Topographical background and early development Depending on the particular context, p olis may have topographical, personal or legal-political connotations: a) a fortified settlement on a height, Homeric pólis akrḗ or akrotátē (Hom. Il. 6,88; 20,52), synonymous with the Acropolis in Athens until the late 5th cent. (Thuc. 2,15,3-6); b) an urban settlement; c) an urban settlement including environs, 'state territory'; d) municipal community, community of polîtai (see below II.).…

Delian League

(858 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (5th cent. BC). The Persian offensive on Greece was repelled in 480-79 BC, but nobody could know at the end of 479 that the Persians would never return. In 478 the Greeks continued the war under the leadership of Sparta, but the Spartan commander  Pausanias soon made himself so unpopular that Athens, either of its own record (Aristot., Ath. Pol. 23,4) or at the urging of its allies, decided to take over leadership (Thuc. 1,94-5). At this point, Athens established a standing alliance (nominally w…

Katalogeis

(200 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (καταλογεῖς; katalogeîs) are known as Athenian Commissioners of Enrolment. During the oligarchical overthrow of 411 BC, 100 men no younger than 40 years of age were chosen as katalogeis - ten from each phyle - in order to draw up a register of 5,000 Athenians intended to have full citizenship ([Aristot.] Ath. Pol. 29,5). The speech by Lysias for …

Dokimasia

(411 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (Δοκιμασία; Dokimasía). In the Greek world it means the procedure of determining whether certain conditions have been met. In Athens the following dokimasíai are attested: 1. The dokimasía of young men who at the end of their eighteenth year were presented to the father's dḗmos to be recognized as a member of the deme and a citizen. The dḗmos, a college of judges and the council took part in this procedure. 2. The dokimasía of the   bouleutaí (council members) in the council and before a college of judges, that of the archontes likewise …

Epoikia

(119 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἐποικία; epoikía). Epoikia was occasionally used instead of apoikía for Greek colonies, e.g. the early 5th-cent. BC Locrian colony near Naupactus (ML 20). The Athenian decree of 325/4 BC regarding the foundation of a colony on the Adriatic coast contains the reconstructed [ apoi] kía as well as époi[ koi]. It has been claimed that strictly speaking epoikia and époikoi did not refer to the original settlement, but to its later reinforcement with additional settlers [1]. This special meaning may occasionally have been intended, but it is u…

Ostrakismos

(836 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ὀστρακισμός, 'trial by sherds' from óstrakon , pl. óstraka, 'pottery sherd'). A procedure in Athens that permitted expulsion of a man from the country for ten years without having been convicted of an offence, but without confiscating his property. According to the (Pseudo-) Aristotelian Athēnaíōn Politeía (22,1; 22,3), ostracism was introduced by Cleisthenes [2] (508/7 BC), but not applied until 488/7. A fragment by Androtion (FGrH 324 F 6) reports that ostracism had been established immediately before its first applicatio…

Apodektai

(87 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἀποδέκται; apodéktai, ‘receivers’). A ten-man board of officials in Athens, with members chosen by lot from each of the ten phylai. They were charged by the boule with receiving state funds and remitting them to the central treasury in the 5th cent. BC, and apportioning them to various spending authorities ( merizein) in the 4th, following routine procedures. They had their own powers of jurisdiction towards tax farmers in cases of up to 10 drachmae (Arist. Ath. Pol. 47,5-48,2; 52,3). Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)

Mastroi

(148 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (μαστροί/ mastroí, ‘searchers’, ‘trackers’) is the name given in some Greek towns to official accountants with functions similar to those of the eúthynoi ( eúthynai ) or logistaí (e.g. Delphi: Syll.3 672; Pallene: Aristot. fr. 657 Rose). The accounting process is called mastráa/mastreía, e.g. in Elis (IvOl 2 = Buck 61) and Messenia (IG V 1, 1433,15-16), the person liable to account, hypómastros, e.g. in Messenia (IG V 1, 1390 = Syll.3 736,51,58). After the synoikismos of Rhodes, the councils of the three original towns of Ialysus, Camirus and Lindus …

Logographos

(255 words)

Author(s): Thür, Gerhard (Graz) | Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (λογογράφ…

Antidosis

(152 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἀντίδοσις; antídosis, exchange). In Athens some…

Zeugitai

(274 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ζευγῖται, literally 'yoke-men', from ζεῦγος/ zeûgos = 'yoke', 'team'), the third of Solon's [1] four property-classes in Athens ([Aristot.] Ath. pol. 7,3 f.). The name indicates either that they were the men rich enough to serve in the army as hoplîtai , 'yoked together' in a phálanx [2. 135-140; 5], or, less probably, the men rich enough to own a yoke of oxen [1. 822 f.]. According to Ath. Pol. (loc.cit.), they were the men whose land yielded between 200 and 300 médimnoi ('bushels'), best interpreted as barley or the equivalent value in other crops [3. 14…

Symmoria

(314 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (συμμορία/ symmoría, 'company'). In Athens in the fourth cent. BC, a group of men liable for payment of the property tax called eisphora or for the leitourg…

Hellenotamiai

(236 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἑλληνοταμίαι). The title Hellenotamiai (‘Stewards of Greece’) was borne by the treasurers of the  Delian League. The exchequer they managed, originally located on Delos, was probably transferred to Athens in the year 454/3 BC (Thuc. 1,96,2; Plut. Aristides 25,3; Pericles 12,1; cf. IG I3 259 = ATL List 1), because the annually elected boards were numbered in a continuous sequence starting in 454/3. From the beginning, however, the Hellenotamiai were Athenians, were appointed by Athens (Thuc. ibid., cf. [1. 44f., 235-237]),…

Thesmothetai

(440 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (θεσμοθέται/ thesmothétai 'establishers of law'). In Athens, a college of six men who were added to the archon, the basileus and the polemarchos to form the college of nine archons. In the fifth or fourth cent. a tenth official was created, known as the 'secretary' (Grammateis) to the thesmothetai, after which one archon was appointed from each of Cleisthenes’ ten tribes (Phyle). Their place of work, the thesmotheteion, became the working-place and eating-place for all the archons (Ath. Pol. 3. 5, schol. Plat. Phaid. 235 d). The thesmothetai were responsible not for…

Lot, election by

(2,381 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) | Ameling, Walter (Jena) | Kierdorf, Wilhelm (Cologne) | Nollé, Johannes (Munich) | Heimgartner, Martin (Halle)
(Greek κλῆρος/ klêros , Lat. sors). I. Political [German version] A. Greece The lot was used especially in democracies, but not only in such, as a means to distribute office among those who were equally eligible, rather than appointing the best candidate under the circumstances. For Athens, the Aristotelian Athenaion Politeia states that Solon introduced the selection of the archons by lot from a short list of pre-selected candidates ([Aristot.] Ath. pol. 8,1; but differing: Aristot. Pol. 2,1273b 35-1274a 3; 1274a 16-17; 3,1281b 25-34). In the…

Sitesis

(218 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (σίτησις/ sítēsis). Provision of food at public expense, on a particular occasion or regularly. There were three categories of recipients [5.308f.]: (a) Officials had the right of sitesis during their term of office; in Athens the prytáneis ate in the tholos (Ath. Pol. 43,3), and secretaries ( grammateîs ) and other officials ate with them [1.7-20] (these officials are called aeísitoi , 'regular eaters'; [1.86,84]). The archons (árchontes) ate in the thesmotheteîon (Schol. Plat. Phd. 235d; location unknown). (b) Recipients of major honours were given…

Dioiketes

(83 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (διοικητής; dioikētḗs). In Ptolemaic Egypt as well as in other parts of the Greek world, the word dioíkēsis was used to designate the administration in general and the financial administration in particular. The title of dioiketes was held by the official in charge of the king's financial administration (see, for instance, OGIS 59; Cic. Rab. Post. 28). Local financial officials may also have held this title (Pol. 27,13,2 with Walbank, Commentary on Polybius, ad. loc.).  Dioikesis Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)

Demarchos

(417 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) | Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich)
(Δήμαρχος; Dḗmarchos). Holder of office with political and/or religious duties in Greek communities. Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) [German version] I. Greece until late antiquity (1) In Athens the demarchos was the highest office-holder in each of the 139 demes ( Demos [2]), into which Cleisthenes had divided the polis ([Aristot.] Ath. Pol. 54,8). By no later than the 4th cent. BC the demarchos was elected by lot in each   dḗmos for one year; the demarchos for Piraeus on the other hand was appointed by the polis (Ath. Pol. 54,8). He convened and chaired the assembly of th…

Euthynai

(257 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (εὔθυναι; eúthynai). The term euthynai (‘straightening out’) was used specifically in reference to the audits of the official conduct of administrators after their departure from office. In Athens, this procedure was split into two parts: on the one hand, there was the lógos (‘statement of accounts’), which looked into the way officials handled public funds, carried out by a committee of ten logistaí (‘auditors’) plus one synḗgoros each (‘legal advisor’) ([Aristot.] Ath. Pol. 54,2), and on the other the euthynae in a stricter sense, offering the opportunity …

Ekklesia

(1,051 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) | Gerber, Simon (Kiel)
(ἐκκλησία; ekklēsía). Assembly of the adult male citizens, which was entitled to the ultimate decision-making authority in the Greek states. At times also called (h)ēliaía (with differences due to dialect) or agorá. The frequency of meetings, the areas of authority, the degree to which independent actions were restricted by the officials' and/or the council's realm of authority, and the number of members of the ekklesia varied depending on the type of the political organisation; thus, oligarchies can exclude the poor from the ekklesia by requiring a minimum of wealth. In the Homeric…

Prohedria

(286 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (προεδρία/ pro(h)edría). The right to occupy a place in the front row in institutions of various kinds; it was conferred by the state on prominent fellow citizens and visitors and is recorded for many poleis. In the 6th cent. BC pro(h)edría was bestowed by Delphi on Croesus of Lydia (Hdt. 1,54,2), and Olympia gave it to a Spartan próxenos (SEG 11, 1180a). In Athens among the recipients of pro(h)edría were the oldest living descendents of Harmodius and Aristogiton (Isaeus 5,47); Demosthenes [2] provided the ambassadors of Philip [4] II of Macedonia with pro(h)edría at the…

Phoros

(1,696 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
(φόρος/ phóros, plural phóroi, 'tribute', 'contribution', from phérein, 'carry', 'take', 'bring'). [German version] A. Definition Phóroi were payments by states to a superior power or to an organization to which they belonged. In particular phoros was the term for the financial contributions made by the members of the Delian League. Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) [German version] B. Size and administration At the foundation of the Delian League in 478/7 BC, the contributions of members were assessed by Aristides [1] from Athens; they were either to provide sh…

Gynaikonomoi

(161 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (γυναικονόμοι; gynaikonómoi). The officials who were responsible in various Greek towns for compliance with laws regarding the behaviour of women, especially at festivals and at funerals, were called gynaikonomoi (‘Women's overseers’). Aristotle regarded this office as neither democratic nor oligarchical but as aristocratic (Pol. 4, 1300a4-8; 6, 1323a3-6). Actually gynaikonomoi are however found in states in varying ways, for instance in Thasos ([2. no. 141, 154-155]; 4th-3rd cents. BC), Gambrea (Syll.3 1219; 3rd cent. BC) or Sparta (IG V 1, 170; 3…

Liturgy

(1,615 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) | Feulner, Hans-Jürgen (Tübingen)
(λειτουργία; Leitourgía). I. Political [German version] A. Definition In the ancient Greek world leitourgía signified a ‘benefit/service for the people’, especially a benefit for the state or a part of the state, which was provided by rich citizens from their own means. Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) [German version] B. Athens The two main forms of liturgy in Athens were the ‘encyclical’, recurring festive liturgy with the responsibility to endow the performers and the celebrations themselves, and the trierarchia with the task of fitting out a shi…

Triakosioi

(298 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
(οἱ τριακόσιοι/ hoi triakósioi, 'the Three Hundred'). Collective name in ancient Athens for a group of 300 men, with various functions: [German version] [1] Group of the wealthiest Athenian citizens, 4th cent. BC A group of the 300 wealthiest citizens in 4th cent. BC Athens, made up of the three richest members of each of the 100 tax groups (Symmoria), created in order to raise the eisphora , a property tax. They were liable for the liturgy (I) of the proeisphora , by which they had to advance the whole sum due from their tax group, and then recover fo…

Hodopoioi

(107 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ὁδοποιοί; hodopoioí). The hodopoioi (‘road masters’) in Athens in the 4th cent. BC were an authority made up of 5 persons (perhaps appointed from phyles grouped as pairs) who were in charge of public slaves to keep the roads in a good condition ([Aristot.] Ath. Pol. 54,1). The assertion of Aeschines (Ctes. 25) that in the time of  Eubulus [1] the administrators of the theorika were hodopoioí can only mean that these officials supervised the hodopoioi or supplied them with the means but not that the authority had been abolished [2. 237f.]. Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) Bibliog…

Neoroi

(189 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (νεωροί/ neōroí). Public officials in Greek states who bore responsibility for shipyards ( neṓria). Athenian inscriptions from the 5th cent. BC mention neōroí (IG I3 154; IG I3 127 = ML 94) and hoi epimeloménoi tōi neōríōi (‘those who care for the shipyard’; IG I3 153); epimelētaí are found at the end of the 5th cent. (IG I3 236); in the 4th cent. the title epimelētaí tōn neōríōn was frequently used. These epimelētaí of the 4th cent. were responsible for the ships and the entire contents of the shipyards. They distributed materials to the trierarchs (…

Epigrapheis

(46 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἐπιγραφεῖς; epigrapheîs). In the 390s BC in Athens, the epigrapheis kept registers of people whom they obliged to pay a special wealth tax, the eisphora (Isoc. Or. 17, 41; Lys. fr. 92 Sauppe).  Eisphora Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) Bibliography R. Thomsen, Eisphora, 1964, 187-189.

Epistatai

(291 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἐπιστάται; epistátai, ‘chairmen’, ‘superiors’). Title for various officials of the Greek world; see also epimelētaí, epískopoi. 1. Epistatai are most frequently found within the administration of both sacred treasures and public works. In Athens, committees of epistatai existed to oversee several of the public building projects of the Periclean era (e.g. ML 59 regarding the Parthenon), to supervise the treasure of the goddesses of Eleusis (IG I3 32; II2 1672), as well as other sacred funds. Epistatai of this nature were also found in other locations, suc…

Syntaxis

(227 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (σύνταξις/ sýntaxis, pl. syntáxeis; from táttein 'to arrange' and syn- 'together'). Term devised by Callistratus [I 2] in the 4th cent. BC for financial contributions to the (Second) Athenian League (Theopomp. FGrH 115 f 98) purposely concealing the compulsion behind it, after the Athenians had promised not to collect phoros ('tribute') as they had done in the hated Delian League of the 5th. cent. BC (e.g. IG II2 43 = Tod 123,23): the syntaxeis were at any rate to some extent under the control of the synhedrion of the allies (e.g. IG II2 123 = Tod 156). The term was used by…

Katoikos

(147 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (κάτοικος; kátoikos). Katoikos (pl.: kátoikoi) denotes usually the ‘inhabitant(s)’ (e.g. [Aristot.] Oec. 2, 1352a 33; Welles 47). In the Hellenistic period katoikos developed into a technical term for citizens who were earlier called klerouchoi , to whom plots of land were allocated in settlements so that they then became eligible for military service. The expression is first found in the phrase kátoikoi híppeis in Egypt in the year 257 BC. (PMich. 1, 9, 6-7). Katoikíai (settlements of katoikoi) are particularly attested in Egypt (e.g. PTeb(t). 30,7; Corpu…

Apostoleis

(83 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἀποστολεῖς; apostoleîs). Athenian government office responsible for sending out naval expeditions and apparently formed ad hoc when special occasions arose. In 357/6 BC they were responsible together with the   epimeletai of the docks for bringing disputes among the trierarchs to court (De. Or. 47,26). In 325/4 10 apostoleis were elected, whose activities were supposed to be under the council's supervision (IG II/III2 II 1, 1629 = Tod, 200, 251-58). Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) Bibliography P. J. Rhodes, The Athenian Boule, 1972, 119-120.

Trittyes

(655 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (τριττύες/ trittýes, sing. τριττύς/ trittýs, 'a third'). At Athens, name for the subdivisions both of the four ancient phylaí (Phyle [1]) and of the ten new phylaí of Cleisthenes [2]. Little is known of the twelve old trittyes. An ancient identification with the phatríai (Phratria; [Aristot.] Ath. pol. Fr. 3 Kenyon = Fr. 2 Chambers) seems to be incorrect. The trittýes may have comprised four naukraríai (Naukraria, naukraros) each, but this is not attested. One of the trittýes was called Leukotaínioi ('white-ribboned'). In the territorial organization of Attic…

Astynomoi

(156 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἀστυνόμοι, ‘municipal administration’). This office is mostly found in Ionian communities. In his survey of officials required by a town, Aristotle mentioned the astynomoi immediately with market supervisors, the agoranómoi (Pol. 6,1321b 18-27), as responsible for the proper state of public and private buildings, the repair and maintenance of buildings and roads and for boundary disputes. There could also be special officials for the walls, wells and ports. In Athens 10 astynomoi, who were annually determined by lot, officiated in the 4th cent. B…

Triakonta

(358 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (οἱ τριάκοντα/ hoi triákonta, 'the Thirty'). In Athens, the oligarchic body of thirty men who ruled in 404/3 BC after the Peloponnesian War (Oligarchia). They were appointed at the urging of the Spartan Lysander [1], with a double commission, to make proposals for constitutional reform, and to rule the state until the reform was accomplished. They began a process of legal revision, aiming to purge the excesses of the demokratia ([Aristot.] Ath. pol. 35,2-3), but before long they obtained the support of a garrison from Sparta and…

Grammateis

(479 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (γραμματεῖς; grammateîs). In the Greek world, grammateis were protocolists, secretaries with a wide range of tasks. Generally, they are distinguished from the árchontes (‘officials’), but like them, they were appointed by the citizenry for a set period of time, either by election or by lot. In Athens, the chief secretary of the state was referred to as the ‘council secretary’ or ‘secretary at the prytany’. He was responsible for the publication of documents resulting from the activities of the council or the citizens' assemb…

Probole

(94 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (προβολή/ probolḗ). Generally a 'putting forward', e.g. of candidates for an office (Plat. Leg. 6,765 b1). In Athens, name of a procedure by which the assembly ( Ekklēsía ) could be asked to vote on certain kinds of accusation before a lawsuit was brought; Demosthenes' [2] attack on Meidias [2] (Dem.. Or. 21) began with a probolḗ. Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) Bibliography A. R. H. Harrison, The Law of Athens, vol. 2, 1971, 59-64  J. H. Lipsius, Das attische Recht, 1905-1915, 211-219  D. M. MacDowell, The Classical Law in Athens, 1978, 194-197.

Nautodikai

(207 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ναυτοδίκαι/ nautodíkai, ‘Overseers of trials involving seafarers’). Officials in Athens responsible for court cases between seafarers, whether traders or klēroûchoi . N autodíkai were documented for the first time around 445 BC (IG I3 41, 90-91) when they brought cases to court within a specific month. For the year AD 397, a complaint can be found in Lysias [1] (17,5) that the nautodíkai had failed to complete a court case about businessmen ( émporoi ) in a specific month, but it was not a matter concerning trade. The nautodíkai were also responsible for complaints …

Kyrbeis

(212 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (κύρβεις; kýrbeis). In Athens, name of the medium on which the Laws of Dracon [2] and Solon were written. The word áxōnes , was also used. The origin of the word is unknown. Contrary to the opinion that kyrbeis should be differentiated from the áxōnes, they are more probably only different descriptions of the same objects [1] (ML 86 = IG I3 84; [Aristot.] Ath. Pol. 7,1; Plut. Solon 25,1f.). The assumption that a kýrbis was a stele, pyramid-shaped and/or equipped with a cover, and the appropriate designation for a stele from Chios from the 6th cent. BC …

Isoteleia

(197 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἰσοτέλεια; isotéleia (equality of duties), i.e. of civic duties) was a privilege that a Greek state could bestow on non-citizens, if it wanted to raise them above the normal status of metics (  métoikoi ), but did not wish to grant them full citizenship. Since the isoteleia normally freed one from taxes and other burdens to which non-citizens were subject, the same status could be called either isoteleia or   atéleia (freedom from duties) (for example in Athens: IG II2 53: atéleia, 287: isotéleia). In Athens, isotelḗs could be added to a man's name as a designatio…

Poletai

(173 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (πωληταί/ pōlētaí), 'sellers'. In Athens, the officials responsible for selling public contracts (e.g. for collecting taxes, and for working sacred land and the silver mines) and confiscated property. The contracts were made in the presence of the council ( boulḗ ), which kept a record until payment was made; the sales of confiscated property were ratified by the nine árchontes [1]. The pōlētaí are mentioned in connection with Solon ([Aristot.] Ath. Pol. 7,3); in the classical period they were a board of ten, appointed annually one from each phyle ([Aristot.] Ath. P…

Agyrrhius

(137 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (Ἀγύῤῥιος; Agýrrhios). Athenian politician from the deme Collytus, active from c. 405-373 BC. He introduced between the end of the Peloponnesian War and c. 392 the payment of an obol for visiting the assembly and later raised the sum from two to three oboles (Aristot. Ath. Pol. 41,3). Therefore probably in error, the introduction of the   theorikon was ascribed to him (Harpocr. s. v. θεωρικά; theōriká). In 389 he succeeded  Thrasyboulus as commander of the Athenian fleet in the Aegean (Xen. Hell. 4,8,31). He spent several years in prison as debt…

Demosioi

(143 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (δημόσιοι; dēmósioi, amplified with ὑπηρέται; hypērétai, ‘servants’). Public slaves who were used by Greek states for a variety of lowly administrative tasks. In Athens they looked after the official records (Aristot. Ath. Pol. 47,5; 48,1), helping the astynómoi in keeping the city clean (Ath. Pol. 50,2) and the hodopoioí in road maintenance (Ath. Pol. 54,1), as well as working in the courts (Ath. Pol. 63-65; 69,1). In the 4th cent. they were used to check coins in silver mints (Hesperia 43, 1974, 157-88); in the 2nd cent., and…

Prohedros

(315 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) | Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich)
(πρόεδρος/ pró(h)edros, pl. πρόεδροι/ pró(h)edroi) denotes that person who (in a leading position) 'sits in front' ('chairman' or 'president'). [German version] I. Greece in the Classical and Hellenistic Periods In early 4th cent. BC Athens, the duty of the chairman of the council ( boulḗ ) and the people's assembly ( ekklēsía ) was passed from the prytaneis to a newly created collegium of nine pró(h)edroi. The pró(h)edroi were summoned each for one day, one from each phyle of the council, excepting the prytany conducting business at just that time. One could be pró(h)edros only once du…

Peloponnesian League

(646 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] Modern term for a group of allied states led by Sparta, which existed from the 6th cent. until 365 BC. The alliance never encompassed the whole of the Peloponnese (Argos [II 1] always refused to acknowledge Sparta's leadership), but did at times include states outside the Peloponnese (e.g. Boeotia in 421 BC: Thuc. 5,17,2). It began to form in the middle of the 6th cent., when Sparta gave up its policy of expansion through conquest and direct annexation and made neighbouring Tegea …

Scythians

(173 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] [1] See Scythae See Scythae. Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) [German version] [2] Group of slaves in Athens, c. 400 BC In late 5th and early 4th cent. BC Athens used a body of Scythian archers as public slaves (Demosioi) who were to keep order at the meetings of the Council and Assembly (e.g. Aristoph. Ach. 54; Equ. 665). They were also called Speusínioi after their alleged founder Speusinus (Suda, s.v. τoξóται; Poll. 8,132). A force of 300 was bought in the mid 5th cent. (And. Or. 3,5 = Aeschin. Leg. 173). According to the lexica they lived on th…

Hendeka, hoi

(194 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (οἱ ἕνδεκα; hoi héndeka). The ‘Eleven’, an office of eleven men, were in charge of the prison in Athens and of the execution of prisoners who had been sentenced to death. They executed ordinary criminals ( kakoûrgoi) or exiles who were apprehended in Athens and turned over to them by means of the   apagōgḗ , without a trial if the prisoner confessed, or they presided over the trial if the prisoner denied his guilt. They also presided over trials that were instituted by means of   éndeixis and over cases that were meant to force the confiscation of…

Parabyston

(73 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (παράβυστον/ parábyston, literally 'pushed aside') referred to an Athenian law court held in an enclosed space, apparently on the Agora (perhaps next to the route of the Panathenaea procession; s. Athens with map). This court dealt with matters that fell within the jurisdiction of the Eleven ( héndeka ) (Paus. 1,28,8; Harpocration, s.v.). Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) Bibliography A.L. Boegehold, The Lawcourts at Athens (Agora 28), 1995, 6-8; 11-15; 111-113; 178f.

Poristae

(74 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (πορισταί/ poristaí, 'providers', from πορίζειν/ porízein, 'provide, supply'), officials in Athens in the last years of the  Peloponnesian War, whose duty was presumably to find sources of money for the city. They are mentioned for the first time in 419 BC, before Athens was in serious financial difficulty (Antiph. Or. 6, 49), and for the last time in 405 (Aristoph. Ran. 1505). Poristai are not attested in inscriptions. Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)

Dikastai kata demous

(185 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] ( dikastaì katà dḗmous) are itinerant judges who in Athens visited the demes to resolve minor matters of litigation. Appointed first by Peisistratus ([Aristot.] Ath. Pol. 16,5) to counteract the power of the nobles in their places of residence, they were probably abolished after the fall of the tyrants. They were revived in 453/2 BC (Ath. Pol. 26,3) to relieve the increasingly overburdened jury courts of minor cases. Their number then totalled 30, perhaps one judge per trittys. In the last years of the Peloponnesian War they were probably unable to visit a…

Aristokratia

(364 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἀριστοκρατία; aristokratía, ‘power in the hands of the best’). In the Greek states there was no institution to ennoble families but in the archaic period the families that were most successful after the  Dark Ages and stood out by wealth and status considered themselves the best ( aristoi). The place of a governing king was taken by a government of members of these leading families: some early testimonials explicitly mention that appointments were made aristíndēn, from the ranks of the best (for example, in Ozolian Locris: ML, 13; Tod, 34). In modern r…

Kome

(894 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) | Ameling, Walter (Jena) | Mehl, Andreas (Halle/Saale)
(κώμη; kṓmē, plural κῶμαι; kômai). [German version] A. Greece in the 5th and 4th cents. BC With the meaning ‘village’, kome signified in the Greek world a small community. Thucydides regarded life in scattered, unfortified kômai as the older and more primitive form of communal living in a political unit (Thuc. 1,5,1; on Sparta: 1,10,1; on the Aetolians: 3,94,4). Under the Aristotelian model of pólis formation, families first group together in a kṓmē, and then the kômai group together in a pólis (Aristot. Pol. 1,1252b 15-28; cf. 3,1280b 40-1281a 1). Scattered living in a kome is typical f…

Archairesia

(76 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἀρχαιρεσία; archairesía). Appointment of officials ( archai). In the Greek world an official was usually appointed for a year either by election ( hairesis in the proper meaning, but the term can be used for any method of appointing officials) or by casting lots ( klerosis). Many states annually convened for an electoral meeting in which honours were conferred and for which a particularly large attendance was desired (e.g. IPriene, 7). Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) Bibliography Busolt/Swoboda.

Polemarchos

(334 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (πολέμαρχος/ polémarchos, plural polémarchoi, 'leader in war') was the title of military officialsin various Greek states. In the stories of the rise of tyrants, Cypselus [2] in Corinth (Nicolaus of Damascus FGrH 90 F 57,5) and Orthagoras [1] in Sicyon (POxy. XI 1365 = FGrH 105 F 2) are said to have been polémarchoi. But it is unlikely that men outside the ruling aristocracy would be appointed to such an office or that the polémarchos of archaic Corinth would have civilian judicial duties like that of classical Athens. In the Spartan army of the fifth-f…

Aeisitoi

(100 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἀείσιτοι; aeísitoi). Aeisitoi are entitled, not just occasionally but regularly, to participate in the banquets prepared by the Greek states (cf. Poll. 9,40). In Athens one so honoured was accorded   sitesis in the  Prytaneion (e.g. IG II/III2 I 1,450b) [2; 3]; as aeisitoi were designated also the officials who were assigned to the council and who ate with the   prytaneis (e.g. Agora XV 86) [1]. Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) Bibliography 1 Agora XV, 1974, 7-8 2 A. S. Henry, Honours and Privileges in Athenian Decrees, 1983, 275-78 archontes 3 M. J. Osborne, Entertainmen…

Deka

(286 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (οἱ δέκα; hoi déka) ‘the Ten’; a committee of ten men, elected after the overthrow of the Thirty in 403 BC to rule the oligarchy of Athens. According to Lysias (12,58) and some other sources, they were to work towards a peace settlement (accepted by [2]), but there is no hint of this in Xenophon (Hell. 2,4,23f.) and it is probably not so (cf. [1]), although the democrats around  Thrasybulus may have hoped that the change of regime in Athens would be followed by a change in direction.…

Ephodion

(65 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἐφόδιον; ephódion, ‘travel money’). In Greece, ephodion denotes the allowance for travel expenses paid to an ambassador (e.g. in Athens: Tod 129; cf. the parody in Aristoph. Ach. 65-67; in Chios: SIG3 402). In the Hellenistic and Roman periods a rich citizen could aid his city by declining such a payment due to him (e.g. IPriene 108). Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)

Petalismos

(113 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (πεταλισμός; petalismós). Petalismos was the name for a ballot using the leaves (πέταλα/ pétala) of the olive tree. At Syracusae, the petalismos was the equivalent of the Athenian ostrakismós , i.e. a procedure for sentencing a leading individual to a period of banishment without finding him guilty of a misdemeanour. Diodorus Siculus (11,87) mentions the petalismos for the year 454/3 BC: it was introduced in the wake of a failed attempt to set up a tyrannis; its consequence was a five-year exile, but it was soon abolished again, as the fear of falling victim to the petalismo…

Strategos

(1,303 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) | Ameling, Walter (Jena) | Tinnefeld, Franz (Munich)
(στρατηγός/ stratēgós, 'army leader'; pl. strategoi). In many Greek states the formal title for a military commander. [German version] I. Classical Greece In Athens, strategoi are occasionally mentioned earlier (e.g. Peisistratus [4] as strategos; Hdt. 1,59,4; [Aristot.] Ath. pol. 17,2), but it was only after the tribal reorganization of Cleisthenes [2], probably first in 501/0 BC, that a regular board of strategoi was appointed: one from each of the 10 phylai, elected annually by the assembly (but candidates may have been pre-selected in the phylai, see [2]), and eligible for …

Corinthian League

(450 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] Modern term for the union of Greek states brought into being in 338/7 BC at an assembly in Corinth by  Philippus II of Macedonia after the battle of  Chaeronea (338 BC). The league evidently included all Greek states with the exception of Sparta, and was associated with a treaty establishing a ‘general peace’ (  koinḕ eirḗnē ). The members' oath and list of league members have survived in part in the form of an inscription (IG II2 236 = Tod 177; further information in Dem. Or. 17). The customary obligations of the treaty among its co-signatories also incl…

Boule

(1,326 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
(Βουλή; Boulḗ) . [German version] A. General In Greek communities the boule was a council assembly, usually that responsible for current public duties, which also had to prepare the work of the public assembly (  ekklēsía ). Composition and responsibilities could change according to the respective form of constitution. In Homeric times the council consisted of nobles convened by the king as advisors; in oligarchically organized communities the boule could become a relatively powerful body, compared with a comparatively weak public assembly, by restricting eligi…

Synoikismos

(484 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (συνοικισμός/ synoikismós, lit. 'living together'). In the Greek world, the combination of several smaller communities to form a single larger community. Sometimes the union was purely political and did not affect the pattern of settlement or the physical existence of the separate communities: this is what the Athenians supposed to have happened when they attributed the Attic synoikismos to Theseus, commemorated by a festival in classical times, the Synoikia (Thuc. 2,15) — whereas …

Archai

(511 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (ἀρχαί; archaí, ‘office holder’). In most Greek states the powers of hereditary kings were divided in the  Dark Ages and the archaic period and distributed among a series of officials ( archai or   archontes ), who were usually appointed for a year, often without the option of re-election. This process cannot be traced in detail because the sources tend toward a too schematic reconstruction. Apart from the offices that were responsible for the state as a whole, special offices were created on occ…

Aisymnetes

(276 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[German version] (αἰσυμνήτης; aisymnḗtēs). Formed from aísa (‘fate’) and   mna (‘to have in mind’): ‘one who has fate in mind (and announces it to the one it affects)’. The Phaeacians (Hom. Od. 8,258-9) name nine aisymnetai, who are responsible for contests ( agones), in the Iliad 24,347 a prince's son appears as aisymnḗtēs. Aristotle sees in the aisymnetes of ancient Greece a kind of monarch, a ‘chosen tyrant’, as demonstrated in  Pittacus of Mytilene around 600 (Pol. 3,1285a 29 - b 1). In the 5th cent. the word appears in Teos synonymously with ‘tyrant’ (Syll.3 38 = ML 30,A; SEG 31,985…

Logistai

(179 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (λογισταί, “Rechner”, Finanzbeamte). Im Athen des 5. Jh.v.Chr. wird in den drei ersten Tributlisten des Attisch-Delischen Seebunds (IG I3 259-261) und im ersten Finanzdekret des Kallias (ML 58 = IG I3 52, A. 7-9) ein Collegium von 30 l. erwähnt. Es ist vermutlich identisch mit dem Collegium, das (ohne Mitgliederzahl) in der Liste der Darlehen aus den Heiligen Geldern (ML 72 = IG I3 369) und in einem Dokument aus Eleusis (IG I3 32,22-28) erscheint. Im 4. Jh. hatten die Behörden einem vom Rat bestellten Gremium von l. in jeder Prytanie ( prytaneía ) ei…

Aeisitoi

(100 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (ἀείσιτοι). A. sind berechtigt, nicht nur gelegentlich, sondern regelmäßig an den von griech. Staaten zubereiteten Mahlzeiten teilzunehmen (vgl. Poll. 9,40). In Athen wurde den so Geehrten sítēsis im Prytaneion gewährt (z. B. IG II/III2 I 1,450b) [2; 3]; als A. wurden auch die Beamten bezeichnet, die dem Rat zugeordnet waren und mit den prytáneis speisten (z. B. Agora XV 86) [1]. Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) Bibliography 1 Agora XV, 1974, 7-8 2 A. S. Henry, Honours and Privileges in Athenian Decrees, 1983, 275-78 archontes 3 M. J. Osborne, Entertainment in the pryta…

Mastroi

(125 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (μαστροί, “Sucher”, “Aufspürer”) werden in einigen griech. Städten Rechnungsbeamte mit ähnlichen Funktionen wie die eúthynoi ( eúthynai ) oder logistaí genannt (z.B. Delphi: Syll.3 672; Pallene: Aristot. fr. 657 Rose). Der Rechenschaftsvorgang heißt mastráa/mastreía, z.B. in Elis (IvOl 2 = Buck 61) und Messenien (IG V 1, 1433,15-16), der Rechenschaftspflichtige hypómastros, z.B. in Messenien (IG V 1, 1390 = Syll.3 736,51,58). Nach dem Synoikismos von Rhodos blieben die Ratsgremien der drei urspr. Städte Ialysos, Kamiros und Lindos unter der Bezeichnung m. be…

Astynomoi

(146 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (ἀστυνόμοι, “Stadtverwaltung”). Das Amt findet sich meist in ionischen Gemeinden. In der Übersicht über die in einer Stadt benötigten Beamten erwähnt Aristoteles die A. unmittelbar neben den Marktaufsehern, den agoranómoi (pol. 6,1321b 18-27), als verantwortlich für den guten Zustand öffentlicher und privater Gebäude, die Instandhaltung und Reparatur von Gebäuden und Straßen und für Grenzstreitigkeiten. Daneben kann es noch spezielle Beamte für die Mauern, die Brunnen und die Häfen gegeben haben. In Athen amtierten im 4.Jh. v.Chr. zehn jährlich dur…

Demenrichter

(164 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] ( dikastaí katá dḗmous) sind Wanderrichter, die in Athen die Demen besuchten, um dort kleinere Streitfälle zu entscheiden. Zuerst von Peisistratos eingesetzt ([Aristot.] Ath. pol. 16,5), um der Macht der Adeligen in ihren Wohnsitzen entgegenzuwirken, wurden sie vermutlich nach dem Fall der Tyrannis abgeschafft. Sie lebten 453/2 v.Chr. wieder auf (Ath. pol. 26,3), um den zunehmend belasteten Geschworenengerichten kleinere Fälle abzunehmen. Ihre Zahl betrug nun 30, vielleicht ein Rich…

Neoroi

(177 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (νεωροί). Beamte in griech. Staaten, die für Schiffswerften ( neṓria) verantwortlich sind. Athen. Inschr. aus dem 5. Jh.v.Chr. erwähnen n. (IG I3 154; IG I3 127 = ML 94) oder hoi epimeloménoi tōi neōríōi (“die sich um die Werft kümmern”; IG I3 153); epimelētaí finden sich am E. des 5. Jh. (IG I3 236); im 4. Jh. wird der Titel epimelētaí tōn neōríōn häufig gebraucht. Diese epimelētaí des 4. Jh. hatten die Schiffe und den gesamten Inhalt der Werften in ihrer Obhut. Sie händigten das Material den Trierarchen aus (Trierarchie) und versuchten, es…

Prostates

(349 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (προστάτης, Pl. προστάται/ prostátai), eine Person, die “vorne steht”, entweder als Führer (z. B. Aischyl. Suppl. 963 f.) oder als Beschützer (z. B. Aischyl. Sept. 408). Die beiden Inhalte konvergieren, wenn Kyros [2] zum p. wird, der die Perser vom Joch der Meder befreit (Hdt. 1,127,1), oder Megabazos [1] sich wegen des Verhaltens der Stadt Myrkinos sorgt, falls Histiaios [1] dort p. wird (Hdt. 5,23,2). Wenn die Spartaner zur Zeit des Kroisos (Mitte 6. Jh. v. Chr.) als p. Griechenlands gelten (Hdt. 1,69,2), drückt dies keine Führungsposition aus; wenn si…

Gynaikonomoi

(155 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (γυναικονόμοι). Als G. (“Frauenaufseher”) wurden in verschiedenen griech. Städten die Beamten bezeichnet, die für die Einhaltung von Gesetzen zum Verhalten von Frauen, speziell an Festen und bei Begräbnissen, verantwortlich waren. Aristoteles betrachtete dieses Amt als weder demokratisch noch oligarchisch, sondern als aristokratisch (pol. 4, 1300a4-8; 6, 1323a3-6). Tatsächlich finden sich g. aber in Staaten verschiedener Prägung, etwa in Thasos ([2. Nr. 141, 154-155]; 4.-3.Jh v.Chr.), Gambrea (Syll.3 1219; 3. Jh. v.Chr.) oder Sparta (IG V 1, 1…

Ostrakismos

(757 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (ὀστρακισμός, “Scherbengericht”, von óstrakon , Pl. óstraka, “Tonscherbe”). Ein Verfahren in Athen, das es erlaubte, jemanden ohne Einziehung seines Vermögens für zehn Jahre des Landes zu verweisen, und zwar ohne ihn eines Vergehens schuldig zu gesprochen zu haben. Nach der (ps.-)aristotel. Athēnaíōn Politeía (22,1; 22,3) wurde der o. von Kleisthenes [2] (508/7 v.Chr.) eingeführt, aber bis 488/7 nicht angewendet. Ein Fr. des Androtion (FGrH 324 F 6) berichtet, der o. sei unmittelbar vor seiner ersten Anwendung eingerichtet worden, doch wurde dies…

Phoros

(1,555 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
(φόρος, Pl. phóroi, “Tribut”, “Beitrag”, von phérein, “tragen”, “bringen”). [English version] A. Definition Phóroi waren Zahlungen von Staaten an eine übergeordnete Macht oder an eine Organisation, der sie angehörten. Im bes. bezeichnete ph. die finanziellen Beiträge der Mitglieder im Attisch-Delischen Seebund. Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) [English version] B. Umfang und Verwaltung Bei der Gründung des Attisch-Delischen Seebunds 478/7 v.Chr. wurden die Leistungen der Mitglieder von Aristeides [1] aus Athen festgelegt; sie hatten entweder Schiffe zu…

Hegemonia

(273 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (ἡγεμονία, “Führungsposition”). Ein wichtiger Grundzug zwischenstaatlicher Beziehungen in Griechenland war die Bildung von Bündnissen, in denen eines der Mitglieder eine hervorgehobene Stellung als hēgemṓn (“Führer”) einnahm. Das früheste Beispiel bildet eine Gruppe von Bündnisverträgen, mit deren Hilfe Sparta im 6. Jh. v. Chr. seine Position auf der Peloponnes sicherte und die sich, nach mod. wiss. Sprachgebrauch, zum Peloponnesischen Bund verdichteten: Kleomenes I. konnte so 506 ‘ein Heer aus der gan…

Hodopoioi

(95 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (ὁδοποιοί). Die h. (“Straßenmeister”) waren im Athen des 4. Jh. v.Chr. eine Behörde von 5 Personen (vielleicht aus paarweise gruppierten Phylen bestellt), die über öffentl. Sklaven verfügten, um die Straßen in gutem Zustand zu halten ([Aristot.] Ath. pol. 54,1). Die Behauptung des Aischines (Ctes. 25), in der Zeit des Eubulos [1] seien die Verwalter der Theorika hodopoioí gewesen, könnte lediglich bedeuten, daß diese Beamten die h. überwachten oder ihnen die Mittel bereitstellten, nicht jedoch, daß die Behörde aufgelöst worden war [2. 237f.]. Rhodes, Peter…

Demarchos

(462 words)

Author(s): Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) | Tinnefeld, Franz (München)
(Δήμαρχος). [English version] [1] Lykier, in Samos geehrt Sohn des Taron, Lykier, wegen seiner Verdienste um die Samier (zur Zeit ihrer Verbannung) und um Phila auf Samos mit Bürgerrecht und Ehrenvorrechten ausgezeichnet (Syll.3 333). Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) [English version] [2] Syrakusischer Stratege, um 400 v.Chr. Syrakusischer Stratege, der 411 v.Chr. als einer der Nachfolger des verbannten Hermokrates das Flottenkontingent der Syrakusier in der Ägäis kommandierte (Thuk. 8,85,3; Xen. hell. 1,1,29) und 405/4 von Dionysios I. als po…

Aristokratia

(374 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (ἀριστοκρατία, “die Macht in den Händen der Besten”). In den griech. Staaten gab es keine Instanz, um Familien zu adeln, aber in der archaischen Zeit betrachteten sich die Familien, die sich nach den Dark Ages als die erfolgreichsten erwiesen hatten und durch Reichtum und Status hervorragten, selbst als die Besten ( áristoi). An die Stelle eines regierenden Königs trat die Regierung durch Mitglieder dieser führenden Familien: Einige frühe Zeugnisse erwähnen ausdrücklich, daß Ernennungen, aristíndēn, also aus den Reihen der Besten, erfolgten (etwa im O…

Dokimasia

(361 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (Δοκιμασία) heißt in der griech. Welt die Prozedur des Nachweises, daß bestimmte Bedingungen erfüllt sind. In Athen sind folgende dokimasíai bezeugt: 1. Die d. junger Männer, die bei Vollendung des achtzehnten Lebensjahres dem dḗmos des Vaters vorgestellt wurden, um als Demengenosse und Bürger anerkannt zu werden. An diesem Verfahren waren der dḗmos, ein Richterkollegium und der Rat beteiligt. 2. Die d. der buleutaí (Ratsmitglieder) im Rat und vor einem Richterkollegium, die der Archonten ebenfalls im Rat und vor einem Ri…

Grammateis

(446 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (γραμματεῖς). Die g. sind in der griech. Welt Schriftführer, Sekretäre mit verschiedenen Aufgaben. Sie werden im allg. von den árchontes (“Beamten”) unterschieden, aber wie diese von der Bürgerschaft durch Wahl oder Los für einen begrenzten Zeitraum bestellt. In Athen hieß der Hauptsekretär des Staates “Ratssekretär” oder “Sekretär bei der Prytanie”. Er war für die Veröffentlichung von Dokumenten aus der Tätigkeit des Rats oder der Volksversammlung zuständig. Bis in die 60er Jahre des 4. Jh. v.Chr. war er ein Mitglied des Rates ( bulḗ ), gew…

Autonomia

(313 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (αὐτονομία). In der Bedeutung “eigene Gesetze haben”, und deshalb nicht den Gesetzen anderer gehorchen zu müssen, kann a. als Synonym von eleuthería (Freiheit) gelten. Sie zielte bes. auf Freiheit in inneren Angelegenheiten, deren Erhalt von Mitgliedern eines Bundes mit hegemonialer Struktur erhofft wurde, während sie die Entscheidung über auswärtige Angelegenheiten dem Bund übertrugen. Das Wort a. soll vielleicht deshalb als Ausdruck dieser Art von Freiheit unter den Bedingungen des Attisch-Delischen Seebunds geprägt worden sein ([2…

Poletai

(183 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (πωληταί), “Verkäufer”, hießen in Athen die Beamten, die für die Vergabe öffentlicher Aufträge (z. B. Steuereinziehung, Bearbeitung von Heiligem Land und Ausbeutung der Silberminen) und den Einzug von konfisziertem Vermögen zuständig waren. Die Abschlüsse erfolgten in Anwesenheit des Rats ( bulḗ ), der bis zur Zahlung Buch führte; die Verkaufserlöse aus konfisziertem Vermögen wurden von den neun árchontes [1] bestätigt. Die p. werden in Verbindung mit Solon erwähnt ([Aristot.] Ath. pol. 7,3); in klass. Zeit bildeten sie ein Gremium von ze…

Bürokratie

(894 words)

Author(s): Gizewski, Christian (Berlin) | Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] I. Allgemein Der Begriff B. entstammt nicht der ant. polit. Terminologie, sondern ist eine neuzeitliche frz.-griech. Hybridbildung (altfrz. “bure”, “burrel” aus lat. burra). B. meint, auch kritisch, spezifische Organisationsformen des modernen Staates [1]. Als “Idealtypus” im Sinne Max Webers kann B. generell eine Sonderform legaler Herrschaft bezeichnen, deren Inhaber in der Verwaltung Funktionäre verwendet, die hauptberuflich, laufbahnartig und besoldet bestimmte sachliche, von der Privatsphäre getr…

Psephisma

(314 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (ψήφισμα, Pl. ψηφίσματα/ psēphísmata) bedeutet wörtl. eine Entscheidung, die durch Abstimmung mit “Stimmsteinen” ( psḗphoi) getroffen wurde, im Gegensatz zur Abstimmung durch Handaufheben ( cheirotonía ). Im üblichen griech. Sprachgebrauch wurde jedoch, ungeachtet der jeweiligen Abstimmungsmethode, ps. für Beschlüsse und cheirotonía für Wahlen verwendet. Ps. ist das am weitesten verbreitete Wort für “Dekret” ( dógma ist häufig in diesem Sinne gebraucht; gnṓmē meint gewöhnlich “Vorschlag”, manchmal aber auch - v. a. in NW-Kleinasien und auf…

Antidosis

(160 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (ἀντίδοσις, Vermögenstausch). In Athen konnte ein zur Leistung einer leitourgía (Leiturgia) Bestimmter versuchen, dies zu vermeiden, indem er jemand benannte, der reicher und nicht von dieser Leistung befreit, aber nicht dazu verpflichtet worden war. Er konnte ihn auffordern, entweder die leitourgía von sich aus zu leisten oder, falls dieser abstritt, mehr zu besitzen, mit ihm das Vermögen zu tauschen. Ein Vermögenstausch war in der Realität wohl durchaus möglich [1; 3], obwohl dies auch bestritten wird [2]. War der Aufgeforderte weder zur leitourgía noch zum…

Kleonymos

(344 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) | Welwei, Karl-Wilhelm (Bochum) | Cobet, Justus (Essen)
(Κλεώνυμος). [English version] [1] Athen. Politiker, brachte 426/5 v. Chr. zwei wichtige Anträge ein Athen. Politiker, brachte im J. 426/5 v.Chr. zwei wichtige Anträge ein: der eine betraf Methone in Thrakien, der andere die Eintreibung der Tribute aus dem Attisch-Delischen Seebund (IG I3 61,32-56; 68). Vermutl. war K. in diesem J. Mitglied des Rates. Im J. 415 gehörte er zu den eifrigsten Befürwortern einer Untersuchung der rel. Skandale (Hermokopidenfrevel; And. 1,27). Aristophanes verspottet ihn als Schlemmer, Lügner und Feigling (Eq…

Epoikia

(114 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (ἐποικία). E. wurde zuweilen anstelle von apoikía für eine griech. Kolonie verwendet, so etwa für die lokrische Kolonie des frühen 5. Jh. v.Chr. bei Naupaktos (ML 20). In dem athenischen Beschluß von 325/4 v.Chr. zur Gründung einer Kolonie in der Adria findet sich das rekonstruierte [ apoi] kía und époi[ koi]. Es wurde behauptet, e. und époikoi im strengen Sinne würden sich nicht auf die urspr. Siedlung, sondern auf ihre spätere Verstärkung durch Neusiedler beziehen [1]. Diese Bed. mag zuweilen beabsichtigt gewesen sein, aber es ist …

Poristai

(65 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (πορισταί, “Beschaffer”, von πορίζειν, “beschaffen, versorgen”) hießen athenische Beamte in den letzten Jahren des Peloponnesischen Krieges, deren Aufgabe es verm. war, Geldquellen für die Stadt aufzutun. Sie werden zum ersten Mal 419 v. Chr. erwähnt, bevor Athen in ernsthafte finanzielle Schwierigkeiten geriet (Antiph. or. 6, 49), und zuletzt 405 (Aristoph. Ran. 1505). P. sind nicht inschr. bezeugt. Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)

Panhellenes, Panhellenismus

(570 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] Die Idee des Panhellenismus beruht auf der Neigung, den Gemeinsamkeiten, die alle Griechen als Griechen verbinden, größere Bed. zuzumessen als dem Bewußtsein von Unterschieden. “Panhellenismus” ist kein in der Ant. gebrauchter Begriff, obgleich in der ‘Ilias (2, 530) und anderswo in der frühgriech. Dichtung Panhéllēnes zur Bezeichnung der Griechen verwendet wird (Hes. erg. 528; Archil. fr. 102 West). Der Troianische Krieg (s. Troia) wurde als Unternehmen dargestellt, zu dem sich die Griechen zusammenschlossen, um Helene [1…

Eukleides

(2,613 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) | Döring, Klaus (Bamberg) | Folkerts, Menso (München) | Zaminer, Frieder (Berlin) | Di Marco, Massimo (Fondi (Latina)) | Et al.
(Εὐκλείδης). [English version] [1] Athenischer Archon im Jahr 403/2 v.Chr. Athenischer Archon im Jahr 403/2 v.Chr. In seinem Amtsjahr machte Athen einen neuen Anfang nach der Oligarchie der Dreißig (siehe etwa And. 1,87-94) und übernahm unter anderem offiziell das Ionische Alphabet (Theop. FGrH 115 F 155). Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham) Bibliography Develin 199 LGPN 2, Εὐκλείδης (9). [English version] [2] aus Megara Schüler des Sokrates, 5./4. Jh. v. Chr. Schüler des Sokrates, Begründer der Tradition der Megariker; geb. zwischen 450 und 435, gest. wahrscheinlich zu B…

Isonomia

(221 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (ἰσονομία). Der Begriff i. (“Gleichheit vor dem Gesetz”) scheint neben anderen mit iso- (“gleich”) gebildeten Komposita im späten 6. und frühen 5. Jh. v.Chr. eine bedeutende Rolle im polit. Diskurs in Griechenland gespielt zu haben. Herodot benutzt i. in der Verfassungsdebatte am Perserhof, um auf die Demokratie zu verweisen (Hdt. 3,80,6; 83,1), und bezieht an anderen Stellen (3,142,3; 5,37,2) I. auf eine verfassungsmäßige Regierung im Gegensatz zur Tyrannis; im letzteren Sinn nutzt er auch isēgoría (“Gleichheit der Rede”) und isokratía (“Gleichheit der Ma…

Ateleia

(175 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (ἀτέλεια). Freiheit von Verpflichtungen, speziell von Steuern und anderen finanziellen Verbindlichkeiten, galt als Privileg, das der Staat verleihen konnte, um jemanden zu ehren. Dieser Begriff und das Adjektiv atelḗs wurden in Athen in Verbindung mit der Befreiung von Liturgien (Demosth. or. 20,1 etc.), von den Beiträgen im Attisch-Delischen Seebund (ML 65) und von der Metoikensteuer (Tod, 178) verwendet. Andere Beispiele umfassen anderswo die Befreiung von Verkaufssteuern (Syll.3 330, Ilion), von Ein- und Ausfuhrsteuern (Syll.3 348, Eretria), von Ab…

Agraphoi nomoi

(185 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (ἄγραφοι νόμοι, “ungeschriebene Gesetze”). Die frühesten Gesetze der griech. Staaten waren ungeschrieben und lebten im Gedächtnis der führenden Familien fort. Bereits in der archa. Zeit begann man, sie aufzuzeichnen, etwa in den Gesetzen des Drakon und Solon in Athen (621/20 bzw. 594/93 v. Chr.) oder in einem Verfassungsgesetz in Dreros auf Kreta (ML 2). Da aber nicht alle geltenden Gesetze sofort niedergeschrieben wurden, blieben ungeschriebene Gesetze neben den geschriebenen in…

Euthynai

(234 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (εὔθυναι). Als e. (“Geraderichten”) werden speziell die Prüfungen der Amtsführung von Beamten nach deren Ausscheiden aus dem Amt bezeichnet. In Athen vollzog sich die Prüfung in zwei Teilen: Zum einen der lógos (“Rechenschaftsbericht”), der dem Umgang des Beamten mit öffentlichen Geldern galt und von einem Gremium von zehn logistaí (“Rechnungsführern”) mit je einem synégoros (“Rechtsbeistand”) durchgeführt wurde ([Aristot.] Ath. pol. 54,2), und zum andern die e. im engeren Sinn, die Gelegenheit boten, jede beliebige Beschwerde über das Verhalt…

Areios pagos

(667 words)

Author(s): Rhodes, Peter J. (Durham)
[English version] (Ἄρειος πάγος). Der “Areshügel” in Athen, nordwestl. der Akropolis. Er verlieh dem alten Rat, der sich dort traf, den Namen (“Areopag”). Auf dem Hügel finden sich keine ansehnlichen Relikte; der Tagungsort wird wohl auf der Nordost-Seite gelegen haben. Wahrscheinlich wurde der Rat anfangs einfach als boulḗ bezeichnet und erst nach dem Hügel benannt, als Solon einen weiteren Rat geschaffen hatte. Zur Zeit Solons bestand der Rat aus allen ehemaligen árchontes , die am Ende ihres Amtsjahres eintraten (anders aber [1]). Er hatte wohl an die 150 Mitglieder. Vermutlich d…
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