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Chares

(964 words)

Author(s): Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) | Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome) | Steinhart, Matthias (Freiburg) | Et al.
(Χάρης; Chárēs). [German version] [1] Athenian strategos, 4th cent. BC Athenian strategos of the 4th cent. BC. In 367/6 he supported Phleius when it was hard-pressed by Argos and Sicyon. The aid he gave to the oligarchs on Corcyra led to that island's leaving the 2nd Athenian League, and brought Athens discredit among its confederates. Not re-elected as strategos until 357/6. The treaty between Athens and the Thracian kings  Berisades, Amadocus I and Cersobleptes under C. in 357 both confirmed the division of Thracian rule and established Athenian poss…

Apsines

(151 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
[German version] (Ἀψίνης; Apsínēs) Valerius [1] A., sophist from Gadara, pupil of the sophist Heracleides and of Basilicus, a teacher of Gaianus, rival of Fronto of Emesa in Athens during the reign of Maximinus, where he was granted the ornamenta consularia (Suda α 4735 Adler). Father of the sophist Onasimus (Suda α 4734, 4736), friend of Philostratus (Philostr. VS 2,33). The works ζητήματα and a Demosthenes commentary (Maximus Planudes 5,517 Walz) have been lost; a corrupt work περὶ τῶν ἐσχηματισμένων προβλημάτων follows a revision o…

Solon

(2,951 words)

Author(s): Meier, Mischa (Bielefeld) | Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) | Michel, Simone (Hamburg)
(Σόλων/ Sólōn). [1] S. of Athens Poet, legislator, c. 600 BC [German version] I. Life griech. Gesetzgeber, um 600 v. Chr. S. (b. c. 640 BC), an Athenian of the family of the Medontidae, supposedly related through the maternal line with Peisistratus [4], the most important Greek legislator (alongside the legendary Spartan Lycurgus [4]) of the Archaic period and the first prominent Athenian poet. S. first emerged around 600 BC, when he successfully appealed for the conquest of Salamis [1] during the conflict with Megara…

Callistratus

(1,229 words)

Author(s): Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) | Schmitz, Winfried (Bielefeld) | Neudecker, Richard (Rome) | Montanari, Franco (Pisa) | Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Et al.
[German version] I Greek (Καλλίστρατος; Kallístratos). [German version] [I 1] Tragedian Tragedian (TrGF I 38), whose ‘Amphilochus and ‘Ixion (DID A 2b, 80) won him second place at the Lenaea of 418 BC; probably not identical with the didáskalos (‘director’) of  Aristophanes [3]. Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) Bibliography P. Geißler, Chronologie der altatt. Komödie, 1969, 6f. PCG IV, p. 56. [German version] [I 2] Important Athenian politician, elected strategos in 378/7 BC Important Athenian politician and outstanding orator, nephew of  Agyrrhius and kēdestḗs (probably fat…

Asopodorus

(53 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
[German version] Writer of iambics, from Phleius, 4th or 3rd cent. BC. Athenaeus is familiar with οἱ καταλογάδην ἴαμβοι (prose mixed with verse?), that are characterized by compound nouns (445b), and a work about Eros (639a), from which he however transmits no fragment, but just an anecdote (631f.). Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)

Varus

(229 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) | Graßl, Herbert (Salzburg)
[German version] [1] Roman cognomen Common Roman cognomen, initially an individual epithet ('bow-legged', cf. Plin. HN 11,254). Recorded for Alfenus [3; 5], Aternius, Licinius [I 46-47], Quinctilius [I 1-3; II 7-8], Vibius. The best known bearer was P. Quinctilius [II 7] V. Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) Bibliography Degrassi, FCap., 149 Id., FCIR, 271 Kajanto, Cognomina, 242. [German version] [2] Sophist from Perge, c. 150 (Οὔαρος/ Oúaros). Sophist from Perge, c. AD 150, from a noble family, presumably the Plancii (Plancius; cf. [1. 22; 2]). Son of one Callic…

Hadrianus

(554 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) | Markschies, Christoph (Berlin)
(Ἁδριανός; Hadrianós) [1]. [German version] [1] Rhetor Sophist from Tyre, at 18 years of age a favourite pupil of  Herodes Atticus (Philostr. VS 2,10,585-586). With  Flavius Boethus (also from Phoenicia) he attended the anatomy lectures of  Galen in Rome in AD 162-166 (Gal. 14,627; 629 Kuhn). He may perhaps have been the target of mockery in Lucian's Pseudologístēs [1]. He taught in Ephesus (Philostr. VS 2,23,605) and (163-169) [2] honoured his patron there, the consular Cn.  Claudius [II 64] Severus, with a statue and a poem [3; 4]. From 176 at the l…

Dionysius

(11,175 words)

Author(s): Meister, Klaus (Berlin) | Karttunen, Klaus (Helsinki) | Ameling, Walter (Jena) | Badian, Ernst (Cambridge, MA) | Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Et al.
(Διονύσιος; Dionýsios). Famous personalities: D. [1], the tyrant of Syracuse; the historian D. [18] of Halicarnassus. Dionysios (month),  Months, names of the. The chronicle of Ps.-D. by Tell Maḥre see D. [23]. I. Politically active personalities [German version] [1] D. I. Notorious tyrant in Syracuse c. 400 BC of Syracuse, son of Hermocritus, born in c. 430 BC, died in 367 BC. Founder of the ‘greatest and longest tyrannical rule in history’ (Diod. Sic. 13,96,4; appearance: Timaeus FGrH 566 F 29). Possessing a sophist education (Cic. Tusc. 5,63), D. had enormous ambitions a…

Marcus

(4,055 words)

Author(s): Wick, Peter (Basle) | Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) | Wermelinger, Otto (Fribourg) | Markschies, Christoph (Berlin) | Rix, Helmut (Freiburg) | Et al.
(Μάρκος; Márkos). I. Greek [German version] [I 1] The Evangelist, [1] (Lat. Marcus). The author of the second Gospel (Mk) could be a missionary (Iohannes) M. who is often mentioned in the NT especially in close association with Paulus (Acts 12:12:25; Phm 24 among others) (for example, for the first time Papias around AD 130, see Euseb. Hist. eccl. 3,39,15). The fact that evidence of a closeness to Paul's theology can barely be found [3] is an argument against this identification, while the straightforwardn…

Moeragenes

(135 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
[German version] (Μοιραγένης; Moiragénēs). Author of ‘Memories of the Magus and Philosopher Apollonius of Tyana (Τὰ Ἀπολλωνίου τοῦ Τυανέως μάγου καὶ φιλοσόφου ἀπομνημονεύματα: Orig. contra Celsum 6,41). The title and size (4 volumes according to Philostr. Ap. 1,3, who bluntly dismisses M. as ignorant regarding Apollonius [14]) suggest that M. (cf. Apollonius of Tyana, epist. 16,17) was not presenting Apollonius in an unfavourable light as a ‘charlatan’ ( góēs), but favourably as a ‘magus’ ( mágos). He is  possibly the M. mentioned in Plut. Symp. 671c and/or the M. of IG 22 6495, a con…

Hippodromos

(465 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
In Greek architecture hippodromos (ἱππόδρομος; hippódromos) denotes the racetrack for horses, which was a customary facility in the polis and the sanctuaries from the early 7th cent. (introduction of chariot races in Olympia in 680 BC). In archaic times the hippodromos was a first-rate place of aristocratic representation, where wealth could be demonstrated visibly before the public through the ownership and regular use of pure-bred race horses. The u-shaped facilities were surrounded by ranks for spectators and furnished with a star…

Hedyla

(107 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
[German version] (Ἡδύλη; Hēdýlē). According to Ath. 297a, the daughter of the Attic female iambic Moschine and the mother of  Hedylus. This means that she wrote in the early 3rd cent. BC [1]. Athenaeus allocates to H. five elegiac verses (and one word of a sixth) that stem from a poem with the title Skýlla. In it  Glaucus [2] brings his beloved  Scylla maritime presents, presumably before her monstrous metamorphosis, in Sicily or southern Italy (cf. Ov. Met. 13, 904ff.; Hyg. Fab. 199). Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) Bibliography 1 GA I,2, 289. SH 456 U. v. Wilamowitz-Moellendorff, Lesefrüchte, in:…

Theodotus

(1,303 words)

Author(s): Höcker, Christoph (Kissing) | Ameling, Walter (Jena) | Günther, Linda-Marie (Munich) | Nutton, Vivian (London) | Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) | Et al.
(Θεόδοτος; Theódotos). [German version] [1] Greek architect, c.370 BC Mentioned several times in the construction records for the temple of Asclepius at Epidaurus as its architect; his origins are as unknown as his subsequent whereabouts. T.’ salary during the project amounted to 365 drachmae per year, together with further payments of unknown object. It is uncertain whether he is the same person as the sculptor T. named in IG IV2 102 (B 1 line 97) as having, for 2,340 drachmae, fashioned the acroteria for the pediment; it is possible that the name T. has been in…

Philostratus

(3,230 words)

Author(s): Weißenberger, Michael (Greifswald) | Bäbler, Balbina (Göttingen) | Zimmermann, Bernhard (Freiburg) | Albiani, Maria Grazia (Bologna) | Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
(Φιλόστρατος/ Philóstratos). [German version] [1] Attic orator, 4th cent. BC Attic orator of the 4th cent. BC, son of Dionysius of Colonus, known from inscriptions (IG II/III2 2,1622,773) and mentions by Demosthenes [2]. In the 90s, while still a young man, he provided lodging for the lover of his friend Lysias (Dem. Or. 59,22f.); in 366/5, he was among the accusers of Chabrias in the Oropus trial; later he gained a victory as choregos with a choir of boys at the Dionysia (Dem. Or. 21,64); in 342, he was trierarch; between 343 and 340, he testified as a witness in t…

Second Sophistic

(2,887 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
[German version] I. Concept A term often used by modern scholarship, particularly for the Greek culture (esp. literary culture) during the Roman Empire between AD 60 and AD 230 when 'Sophistic declamation' (μελέτη/melétē) became one of the most prestigious cultural activities in the Greek world. Philostratus (Philostr.VS 1 praefatio 481, cf. 1,18,507) first uses (and, it seems, coined) the term 'Second Sophistic' to distinguish the declamatory conventions that he claims were introduced by Aeschines ( i.e., for example, the adoption of 'personae' of oligarchs, tyrants o…

Aristides

(3,776 words)

Author(s): Stein-Hölkeskamp, Elke (Cologne) | Fusillo, Massimo (L'Aquila) | Galli, Lucia (Florence) | Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) | Savvidis, Kyriakos (Bochum) | Et al.
(Ἀριστείδης; Aristeídēs). [German version] [1] Athenian politician and srategos (beginning of the 5th cent. BC) Of Athens, son of Lysimachus. He was one of the most prominent politicians and strategoi of Athens at the time of the Persian Wars. In the battle of Marathon, he probably served as a strategos. In 489/488 BC, he was the eponymous archon (Plut. Aristides 1,2, cf. IG I3 1031). In 482 BC, he was ostrazised ( Ostraka) (Hdt. 8,79; Aristot. Ath. Pol. 22,7; Plut. Aristides 7,1 ff.). His rivalry with  Themistocles, documented already in Herodotus (8,79), …

Cleobuline

(49 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
[German version] (Κλεοβουλίνη). (Probably fictive) daughter of  Cleobulus [1] of Lindus, to whom riddles in an elegiac distichon (Fr. 1-2 West) or a single hexameter (Fr. 3 W.) have been attributed since the late 5th cent. BC (Dissoi logoi 3,10 = Fr. 2 W.). Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)

Chrestus

(81 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
[German version] (Χρηστός; Chrēstós) from Byzantium. Sophist; pupil and emulator of  Herodes Atticus; taught in Athens. He had 100 pupils, among them many of significance; an alcoholic; he declined the attempt of the Athenians shortly after 180 to appoint him as successor to Hadrianus as professor of rhetoric in Athens. He died at c. 50 years of age (Philostr. VS 2,11). Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) Bibliography I. Avotins, The Holders of the Chairs of Rhetoric at Athens, in: HSPh 79, 1975, 320-1.

Simylus

(202 words)

Author(s): Hidber, Thomas (Berne) | Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
(Σίμυλος/ Símylos). [German version] [1] Poet of the New Comedy, 3rd cent. BC Poet of the New Comedy, victorious at the Lenaea in 284 BC with his play Ἐφεσία/Ephesía ('The Girl of Ephesus') [1. test. 1]. Pollux also lists the comedy Μεγαρική/Megarikḗ ('The Girl of Megara'), which according to an uncertain expansion of the list of Dionysia victors was supposed to have been performed in 185 as 'Old Comedy' [1. test. 2]. It is equally uncertain whether two and a half iambic trimeters cited by Theophilus of Antioch are attributable to the comic poet S. [1. fr. 2] (cf. S. [2]). Hidber, Thomas (Berne) B…

Ananius

(83 words)

Author(s): Bowie, Ewen (Oxford)
[German version] Ionian iambographer (?  c. 6th cent. BC). Athenaeus quotes four choliambic fragments: three in trimeters and one in nine tetrameters (9W, the longest), on the most appropriate foods for the respective season. Athenaeus ascribes 2W either to A. or Hipponax; Stobaeus ascribes 3W to Hipponax, and the scholiast of Arist. Ran. 659 ff. that ascribes to A. which Dionysus ascribes to Hipponax, in which there is an underlying confusion in ascribing it to about 406/5 BC. Bowie, Ewen (Oxford) Bibliography IEG 2,34-36.
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