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Abodiacum

(135 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Raeti, Raetia Modern Epfach, district of Landsberg am Lech, Germany (CIL III 2,5780); Roman garrison from just before BC to about AD 50, late antique fortifications along the long, steep-sided, island-like Lorenzberg in a bow of the river Lech. 300 m away, underneath the village of Epfach, there is a Flavian road- vicus on the   via Claudia , north-east of the turn-off to Gauting. Building remains on Epfach hill dating from the 3rd and 4th cents. AD; possibly late antique/early Chri…

Medulli

(93 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Alpine tribe, subjugated by Augustus (CIL V 7817 = Plin. HN 3,137); they lived east of the Vocontii and south of the Allobroges (Str. 4,1,11; 4,6,5; Ptol. 2,10,7) along the upper course of the Arc near modern Modane, and, according to Vitr. De arch. 8,3,20, were particularly prone to suffer from goitre. They belonged to the tribes governed by Cottius [1] (CIL V 7231) and later to the prov. Alpes Cottiae. Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography TIR L 32,92 G. Barruol, Les peuples préromains du sud-est de la Gaule, 1975, 334-337.

Genauni

(99 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Alpine tribe in Raetia (Hor. Carm. 4,14,10), subjugated by Drusus in 15 BC, which, like the Breuni, was thought of as Illyrian (Str. 4,6,8); Plin. HN 3,137 has Caenauni, Ptol. 2,12,4 Βένλαυνοι ( Bénlaunoi). It is thought that their dwelling places were, e.g., in the eastern Inn Valley in the Tyrol. Allocation by Paus. 8,43,4 (Britannia) is uncertain [1]. Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography 1 J. G. F. Hind, The ‘Genounian’ part of Britain, in: Britannia 8, 1977, 229-234. R. Frei-Stolba, Die Räter in den ant. Quellen, in: B. Frei (ed.), Das Räterproblem in ge…

Aquileia

(498 words)

Author(s): Heucke, Clemens (Munich) | Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] [1] The modern Aquileia, northern Italy This item can be found on the following maps: Socii (Roman confederation) | Caesar | Venetic | Christianity | Wine | | Coloniae | Coloniae | Commerce | Pannonia | Punic Wars | Raeti, Raetia | Regio, regiones | Rome | Batavian Revolt The present-day town of A. in upper Italy, between  Natiso and Alsa (Plin. HN 3,126), c. 10 km from the Adria (Str. 5,1,8). The name is more likely to be derived from a river name (Zos. 5,29,4) than from an eagle in flight (Julian Or. 2,72 a). Attempts by the Gauls in 186 BC …

Nahanarvali

(89 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] (variant Naharvali). Powerful subtribe of the Vandals/Lugii, which is mentioned in Tac. Germ. 43, 3f. along with the Harii, Helvecones, Manimi and Halisones (Helisii?). The Romans reached these tribes via the ‘Amber Road’ (Amber), which had been open since the time of Nero (AD 54-68). In a holy grove belonging to the N., the Alcis, who were comparable with the Dioscuri, were worshipped in an all-Lugian cult. Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography TIR M 33,63  G. Perl, Tacitus, Germania, 1990, 247f.  D. Timpe, Romano-Germanica, 1995, 107f., 127-131.

Cherusci

(199 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Germanic tribe (first mentioned in Caes. B Gall. 6,10,5; etymology uncertain, possibly connected with * herut, German ‘Hirsch’ [deer]?). They settled south of the Angrivarii and west of the Langobardi, between Weser and Elbe, and north of the Harz mountains. In a state of permanent internal dispute, they were subjugated by Claudius Drusus (in 12 and 9 BC), and by Tiberius (AD 4). However, in AD 9,  Arminius, who was in Roman service, led a successful uprising against Quinctilius  Varus by parts …

Confluentes

(337 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) | Cüppers, Heinz (Trier)
[German version] [1] Modern Koblenz Modern Koblenz, traffic node and commercial port, at the confluence ( ad C.) of the Moselle and the Rhine, on the Mainz-Cologne road along the Rhine Valley and the routes leading from Trier over the Hunsrück mountains and Maifeld to the Rhine (CIL XVII 2,675). A straight pile frame bridge crossed the Rhine to Ehrenbreitenstein from 49 BC (dendrochronology [1]). The Moselle bridge with stone pillars on a pile frame is dendrochronologically younger (AD 104/176). A late Tiberian/early Claudian fort, which was abandoned in AD 70, and a vicus towards the R…

Bodobrica

(80 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] now Boppard. About 1 km east of a vicus from the 1st-3rd cents. AD, the late Roman castle B. of the milites balistarii (Not. Dign. occ. 41,23), with 28 round towers, was developed in the middle of the 4th cent.; in places the walls still reach up to 9 m in height. Early Christian church. Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography H.-H. Wegner, in: H. Cüppers(ed.), Die Römer in Rheinland-Pfalz, 1990, 344-346 E. Dassmann, Die Anf. der Kirche in Deutschland, 1993, 62-65.

Limes

(12,382 words)

Author(s): Olshausen, Eckart (Stuttgart) | Todd, Malcolm (Exeter) | Wiegels, Rainer (Osnabrück) | Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) | Schön, Franz (Regensburg) | Et al.
[German version] I. General In the religious and administrative theory of the land surveyors, the Latin word limes denoted the path marking the boundary between two pieces of land, while in military and political usage (Tac. Ann. 1,50; Frontin. Str. 1,3,10) it meant the border between Roman and non-Roman territory (SHA Hadr. 12). Over recent years, research has led the military connotation of the term limes, which has been used almost exclusively from the 19th cent., to be expanded to comprehend also the historico-geographical and socio-economic fields. Where the limites were origin…

Caelius Mons

(377 words)

Author(s): Förtsch, Reinhard (Cologne) | Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] [1] Hill in Rome Hill in Rome, c. 2 km long, 400-500 m high. Although Caelius Mons (CM) is counted amongst the oldest of the city's hills (Dion. Hal. 2,50,1; Tac. Ann. 4,56; 11,24), its largest part was outside the   pomerium . Even though graves were still sited there in the Republican age, the area later developed into a fashionable residential district (Cic. Off. 3,16,66; Plin. HN 36,48; Tac. Ann. 4,64); in the Imperial Age, when the slopes of the Esquilin and the Colosseum were built up with insulae, the fashionable district moved to the upper part of the hill. …

Batavian Revolt

(604 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Final phase in the civil war that took place after Nero's death between August of AD 69 and September/October 70 north of the Alps (sources in [1]). Tacitus is the main source for a description of the complex chain reactions entailing breaches of faith and new solidarities (Hist. 4,12-37; 54-79; 5,14-26). Some authors (for instance Brunt) claim that Tacitus depicts a believable and consistent overview of the separatist movement against Rome which aimed at a Gallic world empire (cf…

Am(p)sivarii

(176 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Germanic tribe, ‘the people who live on the (lower) Ems’; in AD 9, they stayed loyal to Rome under the leadership of Boiocalus, but during Nero's reign (middle of the 1st cent. AD), following their eviction by the Chauci, they tried in vain to settle in the military territory on the eastern bank of the Lower Rhine [1]. Despite their fifty years of allegiance to Rome, the Romans drove them out; the tribe found no admittance with the  Usipetes, nor the  Tubantes,  Chatti and  Cherus…

Cimbri

(675 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Germanic tribe, who apparently suddenly descended upon Gaul and Italy, but whose origins and itinerary remained a mystery to the Romans (Plut. Marius 11,4; sources in [1], cf. [3. 23-28]). Jutland is assumed to be their homeland, on the basis of a modern hypothesis; that they were driven out by the slow encroachment of the sea, is probably no more than an ancient presumption (Posidon. in Str. 2,3,6; 7,2,1f.). It is a contentious question whether the C. changed their way of life, r…

Aenus

(328 words)

Author(s): von Bredow, Iris (Bietigheim-Bissingen) | Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] [1] Modern Enez This item can be found on the following maps: Byzantium | Thraci, Thracia | | | Colonization | Moesi, Moesia | Pergamum | Persian Wars | Pompeius | Delian League | Athenian League (Second) (Αἶνος; Aînos). The place today known as Enez on the Turkish bank of the Maritza, mentioned by Hom. Il. 4,520 as the home of  Peirous. The name Poltymbria (Str. 7,7,1) is a later construct. Systematic archaeological investigation is not possible because of buildings built over the relevant sites. Traces of a prehisto…

Ovilavis

(149 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Coloniae | Pannonia | Rome Road junction, already inhabited in Celtic times, with a crossing of the river Traun, modern Wels. Occupied after the incorporation of Noricum into the Roman Empire; municipium (CIL III 11785b; IX 2593) under Hadrian, colonia Aurelia Antoniniana (CIL III 5630; CSIR III 3, 1981 [1]) under Caracalla . It is disputed whether O. was the civilian capital city of Noricum Ripense [2]. Several centres of habitation formed within the walls of O. in the 7th/8th cent. ( castrum Ueles fortified in 776). Dietz, Karl…

Chamavi

(170 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Germanic tribe (of uncertain etymology); they preceded the Tubantes and Usipetes as inhabitants of land on the lower Rhine, which was later to become Roman military land (Tac. Ann. 13,55,2); before 12 BC they lived east of the Tencteri, west of the  Bructeri and north of the Marsi (cf. the early medieval district of ‘Hamaland’ around Deventer between IJssel and Rhine). After the defeat of the Bructeri in AD 98, the C. from the west began to settle in the Bructeri's former territor…

Cetium

(158 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Today St. Pölten. A town in  Noricum, situated at the intersection of ancient roads frequented from early times; etymologically probably linked to Celtic * keto -- ‘wood, forest’ (cf.   Cetius mons ). The municipium Aelium Cetensium of the time of Hadrian (CIL III 5630; 5652; 11799) was destroyed in the wars against the  Marcomanni, but soon recovered [1]. Since 1949 significant excavations on the site of the ancient town, which has been built up in modern times. Some slight evidence of Christianity in what little r…

Aguntum

(311 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] This item can be found on the following maps: Pannonia The modern Dölsach and Nußdorf-Debant on the road through the Drau valley (unknown etymology); when the Celtic Laianci came into contact with the Romans at the beginning of the 2nd cent. BC, the municipium Claudium A. (Plin. HN 3,146) with   forum ,   capitolium ,   basilica and  thermae [1] developed about 2 km east of the original town. Mining and processing of metal ensured the economic prosperity of A. and its territory -- from the Felber Tauern to the Kärntner Tor, from the Lie…

Alta Ripa

(100 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] Today Altrip near Speyer. ‘Bell-shaped’, fort with its long side facing the Rhine from the Valentinian period (Cod. Theod. 11,31,4, AD 369) part of the fortress system of the Neckar confluence (Not. Dign. occ. 39; cf. the fortifications providing safe shipping, Symm. Or. 2,20 [1]). Destroyed in the New Year's night of AD 406/7 by  Alani,  Suebi and  Vands.  Castellum Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg) Bibliography 1 A. Pabst, 1989, 147 f., 332 ff. S. V. Schnurbein, H.-J. Köhler, Der neue Plan des valentinianischen Kastells A. (Altrip), in: BRGK 70, 1989, 507-526 S. von…

Langobardi

(572 words)

Author(s): Dietz, Karlheinz (Würzburg)
[German version] (etym. Lang(a/o)-bardoz, ‘the long beards’ [9]). Germanic tribe which Tacitus (Germ. 40,1) and Ptolemy (2,11,9) count among the Suebi; according to tribal mythology [1], they wandered out of southern Sweden as the Winniler into territories south of the Baltic Sea around 100 BC and fused with other peoples. The L. are archaeologically confirmed on the lower course of the Elbe (in the Bardengau) from the 1st cent. BC onwards. Briefly driven back to the east bank by Tiberius in AD 5 (…
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