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Rim-Sin (2.102A)

(430 words)

Author(s): Frayne, Douglas
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Early Old Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary A Sumerian cone inscription of Rim-Sin (the fourteenth king of the Larsa dynasty, who reigned ca. 1822–1763 bce) records the construction of a temple of the god Dumuzi in Ur. Dumuzi was in origin a Sumerian shepherd god who, with the goddess Inanna, served as tutelary deity of the ancient city of Badtibira (var.: Patibira), modern Tell al-Madaʾin. For the most recent discuss…

Lipit-Eshtar (2.95)

(189 words)

Author(s): Frayne, Douglas
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Early Old Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary Numerous clay cones found or excavated at Isin record the construction by Lipit-Eshtar (the fourth king of the Isin I dynasty, who reigned ca. 1934–1924 bce) of a storehouse (ganīnum) for the gods Enlil and Ninlil. This text provides us with the earliest Akkadian translation of the Sumerian royal title lugal ki-en-gi ki-uri, Akkadian šar māt šumerim u akkadim, “king of the land of Sumer and Akkad.” Lipit-Es…

Uruk (2.URUK)

(70 words)

Contributor(s): Hallo, William W.
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Early Old Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary About the time of Sin-iddinam of Larsa a small independent kingdom was established on the Lower Euphrates with its capital at the city of Uruk. The names of eight of its rulers are known. The kingdom came to an end ca. 1800 bce with its capture by king Rim-Sin of Larsa. Uruk

Sin-iddinam (2.100)

(717 words)

Author(s): Frayne, Douglas
Subject: Monumental Inscriptions from the Biblical World; Akkadian Monumental Inscriptions; Building and Display Inscriptions; Early Old Babylonian Inscriptions Commentary A Sumerian inscription known from an Old Babylonian period tablet copy deals with the construction by Sin-iddinam (the ninth king of the Larsa dynasty, who reigned ca. 1849–1843 bce) of a throne for the storm god Ishkur/Adad. The inscription’s account of two butting bull (figures) standing on either side of the base of the throne (lines 75–78) can be compared with the passage in 1 Kings 10:14 describing two li…
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