Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Haase, Mareile" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Haase, Mareile" )' returned 51 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Haruspices

(1,212 words)

Author(s): | Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient see  Divination II. [German version] A. Introduction and definition Haruspices is the Latin term for viewers and interpreters of entrails (of animals) in various ancient cultures, mostly from Etruria (Cic. Div. 1,3). The etymology of the word's first syllable is unclear; amongst others, hira (‘intestines’) and hostia (from haruga, ‘sacrificial animal’) have been assumed [1. 45]. In Roman Republican times, the viewing of entrails ( haruspicina) was regarded as an ars, an ‘empirical science’ based on observation (Cic. Div. 1,24f.), who…

Limitation

(1,518 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto) | Kuhnen, Hans-Peter (Trier)
( limitatio). [German version] I. Etruscan prerequisites To the Etruscans, the definition of real and symbolic space by drawing boundaries ( limites; Varro in Frontin. De agri mensura p. 27 L.) was a prerequisite for the correct interpretation ( Divination) and placement (foundation of cities) of signs: the interpretation of heavenly signs was based on their arrangement in sections of the co-ordinate axes which divide the heavens; the axes are spatially fixed by alignment to the co-ordinates (orientation). Ritual fo…

Vesuna

(184 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] Italic goddess. Cults are recorded by votive inscriptions in the territory of the Marsi [1] (Vetter, no. 223, from Antinum; no. 228b, 'at Milonia'). In the Umbrian Tabulae Iguvinae III/IV (Iguvium), she is the object of sacrificial activities and prayers, together with Pomonus Popdicus, a god of fruits and perhaps of the annual cycle [1. 497]. A (hierarchical) relationship with this god also becomes clear in the formulation of the name ( Vesune Puemunes Pupřikes, 'V. (dative singular) of P. P.') and is conditioned by the role of the deity in the conte…

Hittite law

(1,129 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto) | Haase, Richard (Leonberg)
[German version] A. Sources 1. The so-called Hittite laws 2. The Anitta text 3. The autobiography of Ḫattušilis I. 4. The ‘Political Testament’ of Ḫattušilis I. 5. Royal decrees 6. Court records. 7. Royal letters 8. Funerary rituals 9. So-called deeds of donation of land 10. The field texts 11. The charters for individual vassals 12. The state contracts. Haase, Mareile (Toronto) [German version] B. Civil and criminal law A body of laws, for which the name ‘Hittite Laws’ has come into use, primarily provides information (however, the term ‘law’ should …

Iynx

(278 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
(ἴυγξ; íynx). [German version] [1] Demon related to the genesis of the world Iynx (‘sounding’, cf. ἰύζω/ iýzō) refers to 1. a bird, 2. a humming wheel used in magical rites, and 3. a demon in  theurgy who is associated with the origin of the world and mediates between humans and gods. In myth the bird is transformed from a seductive nymph, the daughter of Echo or Peitho and perhaps  Pan (Callim. Fr. 685; Phot. and Suda, s.v. I.), or from a woman who competed with the Muses in singing (Nicander in Antoninus Liberalis 9). The wheel and the bird were important in the Greek love-spell in myth…

Pars antica, postica

(212 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] Technical term in Roman divination (VII.) (augury: e.g. Serv. Aen. 2,453; interpretation of thunder and lightning: schol. Veronensia Verg. Aen. 2,693). PA describes the two spatial semiotic units ( partes, spatia: Serv. Ecl. 9,15) of the field of observation in front of the diviner, PP the two behind, constructed with the help of a system of rectangular co-ordinates ( Templum ). This system of spatial orientation, which was also the basis of Roman surveying, with rules for drawing boundaries ( constitutio limitum: Hyginus p. 166f. Lachmann) is traced by Varro …

Numa Pompilius

(690 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] (Νομᾶς/ Nomâs, Νόμας/ Nómas, Νουμᾶς/ Noumâs). In the ancient tradition the second king of Rome after Romulus, founder of Roman sacred law and Roman state cult ( sacra publica: Liv. 1,32,2). The patronymic ‘Numas’ in an Etruscan inscription on an urn from Perugia from the Hellenistic period (ET Nr. Pe 1.11; [3. 350]) constitutes no proof of an Etruscan origin for the name (different e.g. [1. 88]). According to tradition N. hailed from the city of Cures in the land of the Sabines. His birthday coincides with the …

Umbricius

(107 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] C. U. Melior. Haruspex Caesarum, patronus municipii (AE 1930, no. 52; the dolphin as a word separator in the inscription probably locates its patronate in Tarentum; Haruspices with ill.; Patronus D.). On 15 January 69 U. predicted to Galba [2] from liver signs the latter's imminent overthrow by Otho (Tac. Hist. 1,27; Plut. Galba 24). His technical work De Etrusca Disciplina was Pliny's most recent source for (bird) portents (Plin. HN. 10; 11 index auct.; 10,19; [1]). Divination VII.; Etrusci III. D. Haase, Mareile (Toronto) Bibliography 1 D. Briquel, Sur un frag…

Volnius

(67 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] Author, probably in the 1st cent. BC, who wrote 'Etruscan tragedies' ( tragoediae Tuscae). V. was Varro's [2] (Ling. 5,55; written in c. 45 BC) informant for the Etruscan origin of the names of the first Roman tribus : tribus Titiensium, tribus Ramnium, tribus Lucerum. Haase, Mareile (Toronto) Bibliography C. O. Thulin, Die etruskische Disciplin III, 1909 (repr. 1968), 48  W. Strzelecki, s. v. V., RE 9 A, 766 f.

Theoi patrioi

(364 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] (θεοὶ πάτριοι/πατρῷοι; theoì pátrioi/ patrôioi; πατρικοί/ patrikoí: P CZ 3, 59421,2; 3rd cent. BC; [8.883]), 'fatherly' (inherited, native, traditional) deities; in multilingual inscriptions Lat. patrii di (e.g. inscriptions by Cornelius Gallus in: OGIS II 654,9; 29 BC; Philae). The word patrôios in particular appears in connection with theonyms, above all for Apollo [2; 9] and Zeus. In many cases, the semantic differentiations made between pátrios, patrôios, patrikós by ancient lexicographers (supporting evidence: ThGL VI 612) do not correspon…

Saeculum

(750 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto) | Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt)
('Age'). [German version] I. General Censorinus [4] takes up ancient theories on saeculum in ch. 17 of De die natali (AD 238) in the framework of chronographic remarks. His sources include Varro, who, according to Serv. Aen. 8,526, was the author of a text, De saeculis. Censorinus, DN 17,2, defined saeculum as 'the length of the longest possible human lifetime' ( spatium vitae humanae longissimum partu et morte definitum). Censorinus makes a clear distinction between Etruscan (17,5-6) and Roman traditions (17,7-15; Roman(or)um saeculum: 17,7): the ritual staging of the beginn…

Augury

(445 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] (ὀρνιθομαντεία/ ornithomanteía 'bird divination' or ὀρνιθοσκοπία/ ornithoskopía 'bird watching', also ὀρνιθεία/ ornitheía 'bird (art)'; Latin auspicium 'bird watching', augurium; cf. Augures ; cf. Umbrian aves anzeriaom). Method of divination; the interpretation results from the configuration of visual and aural signs (bird species, motion [in flight]; bird noises) and from its arrangement into a space defined by boundaries and divided into meaningful sections (Latin templum ; Limitation [I], Pars antica, postica ). The tradition of the theory of aug…

Tarquitius

(422 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) | Haase, Mareile (Toronto) | Eck, Werner (Cologne)
Roman nomen gentile of Etruscan origin (in Antiquity probably seen as a variant of Tarquinius , cf. Fest. 496). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig (Bochum) I. Republican period [German version] [I 1] T. Priscus Technical author, 1st cent. BC? Latin writer perhaps of the 1st cent. BC (cf. Verg. Catal. 5,3); mentioned in Macrobius [1] (Sat. 3,20,3; 5. cent. BC) as the author of an ostentarium arborarium (Etrusci, Etruria III with ill. on Etrusca disciplina), probably an ordered and annotated list of trees and shrubs ( arbores) of significance in divination. T. may also be meant in Plin. HN 2; …

Aretalogies

(692 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] Term of modern scholarship for a group of ancient religious texts. The term (following [10]) is based on the Greek ἀρεταλογία/ aretalogía, 'celebration (of the deeds and qualities of a deity)' (from aretḗ, here '(deed of) wonder, miracle, sphere of power', and légein, 'to speak'). Sources: LXX Sirach 36,19, c. 180 BC; cf. Str. 17,1,17 (possibly corrupted); pejorative in Manetho [2], Apotelesmatiká 4,447; cf. Latin virtutes narrare: Ter. Ad. 535f. There is no record of the term 'aretalogy' as the name of a genre of texts in Antiquity. None of the…

Libum

(222 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] (-us; Greek σποντίτης/ spontítēs etc.; small libum: libacunculus). (Honey) pastry, a kind of placenta (sacrificial cake; Serv. Aen. 7,109). Types: [1]; strues (Fest. 407 L.) among others; cf. Umbr. strusla ( Tabulae Iguvinae: [2]). Recipe: Cato Agr. 75. Introduced by Numa according to Enn. Ann. fr. 121 V. Production and sale by bakers of cakes, libarii: Sen. Ep. 56,2; CIL IV 1768, fictores : Varro, Ling. 7,44. Pictorial representations are not classifiable with certainty [3]. The libum is a cult element: combination with liquid ( merum, lac: wine, milk; libum from libar…

Wedding customs and rituals

(2,114 words)

Author(s): Oswald, Renate (Graz) | Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] I. General comments The purpose of ancient wedding customs and rituals was to achieve the cultic purification of the wedding couple, seal their union by offering sacrifices, enhance fertility and strengthen the couple, as well as to protect the bride from calamity and evil spirits on her way to the bridegroom's house and guide her in assuming her new position as wife and mother. The rituals lasted for several days, beginning in the bride's house, where they signaled her departure fro…

Isis

(2,340 words)

Author(s): Grieshammer, Reinhard (Heidelberg) | Haase, Mareile (Toronto) | Takacs, Sarolta A. (Cambridge, MA)
[German version] I. Egypt The origin, meaning of the name and original role of the Egyptian goddess I. are not entirely certain. There is much evidence to indicate a home in the 12th Egyptian district with its capital at Per-Hebit ( pr-ḥbjt), Latin Iseum, modern Bahbīt al-Ḥiǧāra. The long-standing opinion that I. personifies the royal throne is based on the fact that her name was written with the image of a throne. However, the likely root of the name ( st) describes I. as ‘one who has power to rule’. It is significant that she is included in the Osiris myth, in which seve…

Comics

(3,918 words)

Author(s): Geus, Klaus (Bamberg) | Haase, Mareile (Toronto) | Eickhoff, Birgit (Gießen RWG)
Geus, Klaus (Bamberg) [German version] I. Genre (CT) Geus, Klaus (Bamberg) [German version] A. Definition (CT) Comics are a special kind of picture story, originating in the United States at the end of the 19th cent. They can be described as a form of story in which text and pictures are organised in a narrative sequence, and arranged ,for the most part, chronologically. Comics developed from the political and satirical caricatures of the 18th and 19th cents.[1]. Long dismissed as trivial and juvenile literatur…

Numitor

(177 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] (Greek i. a. Νεμέτωρ/ Nemétōr, Νομήτωρ/ Nomḗtōr). Figure from the legend of the founding of Rome by Romulus: older son of Procas; father of Rhea Silvia; king of Alba Longa. Deposed by his brother Amulius, N. is reinstated again with the help of his grandsons Romulus und Remus (e.g. Liv. 1,3-6; Dion. Hal. Ant. 1,71; 76-84; Plut. Romulus 3-8); this event marks the moment in the story which directly precedes the founding of the city. In the literature about the history of Rome, N. is first mentioned by Fabius Pictor (2nd half 3rd cent. BC.), whose source is…

Necromancy

(309 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] Divination technique, a form of symbolic communication with the dead outside the cult of the dead proper. Greek νέκυια/ nékyia, νεκυομαντεία/ nekyomanteía (borrowed into Latin) described the necromancy ritual and is the title of literary and visual representations (Plin. HN 35,132; Gell. NA 16,7,12; 20,6,6; Plut. Mor. 740e-f; Lucian. Menippus). There are hints of necromancy rituals in the so-called Magical Papyri (PGM VII 285; III 278; IV 222; 3rd or 4th cents. AD). The most detailed sources from anci…

Votive practice

(858 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] Form of symbolic interaction in a religious context, consisting of a vow (Gr. εὐχή/ euchḗ, εὐχωλή/ euchōlḗ; Lat. votum), which involved a request (prayer), and the fulfilment of the vow as a sign of gratitude for having had the request granted. Vow and gratitude could each be expressed by setting up (Gr. ἀνατιθέναι/ anatithénai, also ἱστάναι/ histánai) or giving (Lat. ponere, (donum) dare; cf. also Etruscan mul(u)vanice, tur(u)ce: [2; 12]) a votive offering (Gr. ἀνάθημα/ anáthēma , δῶρον/ dôron; Lat. votum). These were objects of various size and economic val…

Libation

(773 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes (Berlin) | Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[German version] I. Ancient Orient and Egypt Since sacrifices were primarily intended to ensure that the daily needs of the gods were met, not only victuals but also beverages (generally water, beer, wine) were an essential component of regular sacrifices to the gods, as well as of sacrifices offered to the dead. Both in Egypt and in Mesopotamia, libation and terms used for libation stand as pars pro toto for sacrifice. This may have stemmed originally from the fact that for people living at a subsistence level the libation of water constituted their only opport…

Proserpina

(815 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
Roman deity; Cic. Nat. D. 2,66 explains she is the goddess the Greeks called Persephone. [German version] A. Theology The derivation of the name P. from Latin (pro-)serpere, 'creep (forward)', in Varro is connected with the allegorical interpretation of P. as 'grain's germ' ( frumenta germinantia) and as 'the lower part of the earth' ( terrae inferior pars) and its associated deities (e.g. Luna, Diana, Tellus, Vesta: Varro Ling. 5,68; Varro Antiquitates fr. 28, 167, 268 Cardauns). This is not 'folk etymology' (contra: [4. 229; 11. 265]), but Stoic lin…

Iynx

(274 words)

Author(s): Johnston, Sarah Iles (Princeton) | Haase, Mareile (Berlin)
(ἴυγξ). [English version] [1] Dämon im Zusammenhang mit der Weltentstehung Mit i. (“tönend”, vgl. ἰύζω) werden 1. ein Vogel, 2. ein summendes, in mag. Riten verwendetes Rad und 3., in der Theurgie, ein Dämon bezeichnet, der mit der Weltentstehung verbunden ist und zw. Menschen und Göttern vermittelt. Im Mythos wird der Vogel aus einer verführerischen Nymphe verwandelt, der Tochter von Echo oder Peitho und vielleicht Pan (Kall. fr. 685; Phot. und Suda, s.v. I.), oder aus einer Frau, die mit den Musen im Singen wetteiferte (Nikandros bei Antoninus Liberalis 9). Rad und Vogel waren wich…

Saeculum

(669 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Berlin) | Rüpke, Jörg (Erfurt)
(“Zeitalter”). [English version] I. Allgemeines Die ant. Theorien zum s. behandelt Censorinus [4] in Kap. 17 von De die natali (238 n. Chr.) im Rahmen chronographischer Ausführungen. Seine Quelle ist u. a. Varro, der Serv. Aen. 8,526 zufolge einen Text De saeculis verfaßte. Cens. 17,2 definiert s. als “längstmögliche menschliche Lebensdauer” ( spatium vitae humanae longissimum partu et morte definitum). Etr. (17,5-6) und röm. Trad. (17,7-15) sind bei Censorinus klar geschieden ( Roman(or)um s.: 17,7): Die rituelle Inszenierung des Beginns eines neuen s. durch die ludi Terentini o…

Limitation

(1,300 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Berlin) | Kuhnen, Hans-Peter (Trier)
( limitatio). [English version] I. Etruskische Voraussetzungen Die Definition des tatsächlichen und des symbolischen Raumes durch Ziehen von Grenzen ( limites; Varro bei Frontin. de agri mensura p. 27 L.) war bei den Etruskern Voraussetzung für korrekte Zeichendeutung (Divination) und -setzung (Stadtgründung): die Deutung von Himmelszeichen beruht auf ihrer Einordnung in Abschnitte des Achsenkreuzes, in die der Himmel geteilt wird; das Kreuz ist durch Ausrichtung an den Koordinaten räumlich verankert (Orientierung)…

Libum

(190 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Berlin)
[English version] (-us; griech. σποντίτης/ spontítēs u.a.; kleines l.: libacunculus). (Honig-)Gebäck, Art placenta (Opferkuchen; Serv. Aen. 7,109). Arten: [1]; u.a. strues (Fest. 407 L.); vgl. umbr. strusla (Tabulae Iguvinae: [2]). Rezept: Cato agr. 75. Eingeführt von Numa laut Enn. ann. fr. 121 V. Herstellung, Verkauf durch Kuchenbäcker, libarii: Sen. epist. 56,2; CIL IV 1768, fictores : Varro ling. 7,44. Bildliche Darstellungen sind nicht sicher zuordenbar [3]. Das l. ist Kultelement: Kombination mit flüssigen ( merum, lac: Wein, Milch; l. von libare “ein Trankopfer bring…

Comics

(3,597 words)

Author(s): Geus, Klaus (Bamberg) RWG | Eickhoff, Birgit (Gießen) RWG | Haase, Mareile (Erfurt) RWG
Geus, Klaus (Bamberg) RWG [English version] I. Gattung (RWG) Geus, Klaus (Bamberg) RWG [English version] A. Definition (RWG) C. sind eine spezielle Art der Bildergeschichte, die vor der Jahrhundertwende in den USA entstand. Sie läßt sich als Erzählform beschreiben, in der Text und Bilder in einer narrativen, meist chronologisch angeordneten Sequenz gegliedert sind. C. entwickelten sich aus der polit. und satirischen Karikatur des 18. und 19. Jh. [1]. Lange als Trivial- und Jugendlit. abqualifiziert, hat sich dur…

Hochzeitsbräuche und -ritual

(1,864 words)

Author(s): Oswald, Renate (Graz) | Haase, Mareile (Berlin)
[English version] I. Allgemeines Der Zweck aller ant. H. ist es, das Brautpaar kult. zu reinigen, den Bund durch Opfer zu besiegeln, die Fruchtbarkeit zu steigern und Kraft zu spenden, die Braut auf ihrem Weg zum Haus des Ehemannes vor Unheil und Schadewesen zu schützen und sie in ihren neuen Status als Ehefrau und Mutter einzuführen. Die Riten erstreckten sich über mehrere Tage, begannen im Haus der Braut, wo sie die Trennung vom elterlichen Herd signalisierten, bezogen den Weg zum Haus des Bräutig…

Votivkult

(771 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile
[English version] Form der symbolischen Interaktion in rel. Kontext, bestehend aus dem mit einer Bitte (Gebet) verbundenen Gelübde (griech. εὐχή/ euchḗ, εὐχωλή/ euchōlḗ; lat. votum) des Ausführenden und dem Einlösen des Gelübdes als Dank für die Erfüllung der Bitte. Gelübde und Dank können jeweils durch das Aufstellen (griech. ἀνατιθέναι/ anatithénai, auch ἱστάναι/ histánai) bzw. das Geben (lat. ponere, (donum) dare; vgl. auch etr. mul(u)vanice, tur(u)ce: [2; 12]) eines Votivgegenstands (griech. ἀνάθημα/ anáthēma , δῶρον/ dṓron, lat. votum) ausgedrückt sein. Es handelt …

Trankopfer

(627 words)

Author(s): Renger, Johannes | Haase, Mareile
[English version] I. Alter Orient und Ägypten Da Opfer v. a. die tägliche Versorgung der Götter sicherstellen sollten, waren Getränke (in der Regel Wasser, Bier, Wein) neben Viktualien unverzichtbarer Bestandteil der regelmäßigen Opfer für die Götter, aber auch der Totenopfer. Sowohl in Äg. als auch in Mesopotamien stehen die Libation bzw. Termini für die Libation als pars pro toto für Opfer. Dies mag seinen urspr. Grund darin haben, daß für die auf Subsistenzniveau lebenden Menschen die Libation von Wasser die einzige Möglichkeit darstellte, ein Opfe…

Numa Pompilius

(583 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Berlin)
[English version] (Νομᾶς, Νόμας, Νουμᾶς). In der ant. Überl. zweiter König Roms nach Romulus, Begründer röm. Sakralgesetzgebung und röm. Staatskults ( sacra publica: Liv. 1,32,2). Der Vatername “Numas” in der etr. Inschr. auf einer erst hell. Urne aus Perugia (ET Nr. Pe 1.11; [3. 350]) ist kein Beweis für etr. Herkunft des Namens (anders z.B. [1. 88]). Der Überl. zufolge stammt N. aus der Stadt Cures im Sabinerland; sein Geburtstag stimme mit dem Gründungstag Roms am 21. April überein (Cic. rep. 25; Liv. 1,18,1; Dion. H…

Vesuna

(167 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile
[English version] Ital. Göttin. Kulte im Gebiet der Marsi [1] sind durch Votivinschr. belegt (Vetter, Nr. 223, aus Antinum; Nr. 228b, “bei Milonia”). In den umbrischen Tabulae Iguvinae III/IV (Iguvium) ist sie Adressatin von Opferhandlungen und Gebeten zusammen mit Pomonus Popdicus, einem Gott der Früchte und vielleicht des Jahreszyklus [1. 497]. Eine (hierarchische) Zuordnung zu diesem Gott wird auch in der Formulierung des Namens deutlich ( Vesune Puemunes Pupřikes, “V. (Dat. Sg.) des P. P.”) und ist bedingt durch die Funktion der Gottheit im Handlungskontex…

Proserpina

(767 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Berlin)
Röm. Gottheit; von Cic. nat. deor. 2,66 erklärt als diejenige, die von den Griechen Persephone genannt wird. [English version] A. Theologie Die Herleitung des Namens P. von lat. (pro-)serpere, “(hervor-)schlängeln”, bei Varro steht allgemein im Zusammenhang mit der allegorischen Deutung der P. als “Getreidekeim” ( frumenta germinantia) und als “unterer Teil der Erde” ( terrae inferior pars) sowie mit der daraus abgeleiteten Assoziation mit anderen Gottheiten (z. B. Luna, Diana, Tellus, Vesta: Varr. ling. 5,68; Varr. antiquitates fr. 28, 167, 268 Card…

Haruspices

(1,127 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Toronto)
[English version] I. Alter Orient s. Divination. II. [English version] A. Einleitung und Definition H. ist die lat. Bezeichnung für Eingeweidebeschauer und -deuter (bei Tieren) verschiedener ant. Kulturkreise, v.a. aus Etrurien (Cic. div. 1,3). Die Etym. des ersten Wortgliedes ist ungeklärt; man hat u.a. hira (“Gedärm”) und hostia (von haruga, “Opfertier”) angenommen [1. 45]. Die Eingeweideschau ( haruspicina) galt in republikanischer Zeit in Rom als ars, eine auf Beobachtung beruhende “Erfahrungswiss.” (Cic. div. 1,24f.), deren Beherrschung und Pflege versc…

Totenbefragung

(275 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile
[English version] Technik der Divination, Form der symbolischen Kommunikation mit Verstorbenen außerhalb des eigentlichen Totenkults. Griech. νέκυια/ nékyia, νεκυομαντεία/ nekyomanteía (im Lat. entlehnt) bezeichnet das T.-Ritual und ist Titel lit. und bildlicher Darstellungen (Plin. nat. 35,132; Gell. 16,7,12; 20,6,6; Plut. mor. 740e-f; Lukian. Menippos). Es gibt Hinweise auf T.-Rituale in den sog. Zauberpapyri (PGM VII 285; III 278; IV 222; 3. bzw. 4. Jh. n. Chr.). Die ausführlichsten Quellen aus dem ant. Grieche…

Theoi patrioi

(329 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile
[English version] (θεοὶ πάτριοι; πατρῷοι/ patrṓioi; πατρικοί/ patrikoí: P CZ 3, 59421,2; 3. Jh. v. Chr.; [8. 883]), “väterliche” (ererbte, heimische, althergebrachte) Gottheiten; in mehrsprachigen Inschr. lat. patrii di (z. B. Inschr. des Cornelius Gallus in: OGIS II 654,9; 29 v. Chr.; Philai). Bes. patrṓios erscheint auch in Verbindung mit Theonymen, v. a. Apollon [2; 9], Zeus. Semantische Differenzierungen zw. pátrios, patrṓios, patrikós bei ant. Lexikographen (Belege: ThGL VI 612) stimmen mit dem tatsächlichen Befund häufig nicht überein. Mit den th. p., ebenso wie…

Isis

(2,183 words)

Author(s): Grieshammer, Reinhard (Heidelberg) | Takacs, Sarolta A. (Cambridge, MA) | Haase, Mareile (Berlin)
[English version] I. Ägypten Herkunft, Deutung des Namens und urspr. Funktion der ägypt. Göttin I. sind nicht eindeutig geklärt. Vieles spricht für ihre Heimat im 12. unteräg. Gau mit seiner Hauptstadt Per-Hebit ( pr-ḥbjt), lat. Iseum, h. Bahbīt al-Ḥiǧāra. Der mit dem Bild eines Thrones geschriebene Name hat lange die Annahme bestimmt, I. personifiziere den königlichen Thron. Doch die sehr wahrscheinliche Grundform des Namens ( st) charakterisiert I. als “die, die herrschaftliche Macht hat”. Bedeutsam ist die Einbindung in den Osiris-Mythos, in dem mehrere d…

Tarquitius

(377 words)

Author(s): Elvers, Karl-Ludwig | Haase, Mareile | Eck, Werner
Röm. Gentilname etr. Herkunft (in der Ant. wohl als Nebenform von Tarquinius angesehen, vgl. Fest. 496). Elvers, Karl-Ludwig I. Republikanische Zeit [English version] [I 1] T. Priscus Fachautor, 1. Jh. v. Chr.? Lat. schreibender Autor vielleicht des 1. Jh. v. Chr. (vgl. Verg. catal. 5,3); genannt bei Macrobius [1] (Sat. 3,20,3; 5. Jh. n. Chr.) als Verf. eines ostentarium arborarium (Etrusci, Etruria III. mit Abb. zur Etrusca disciplina), wohl einer geordneten und kommentierten Auflistung von Bäumen und Sträuchern ( arbores) von Bed. in der Divination. T. dürfte auch…

Pars antica, postica

(193 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Berlin)
[English version] T.t. röm. Divination (VII.) (Vogelschau: z.B. Serv. Aen. 2,453; Blitz- und Donnerdeutung: schol. Veronensia Verg. Aen. 2,693). Vom Ausführenden aus bezeichnet p.a. die beiden vorderen, p.p. die beiden hinteren räumlich-semiotischen Einheiten ( partes, spatia: Serv. ecl. 9,15) des mit Hilfe eines rechtwinkligen Achsenkreuzes konstruierten Beobachtungsfeldes ( templum ). Dieses auch der röm. Feldmessung zugrundeliegende räumliche Orientierungssystem mit den Grenzziehungsregeln ( constitutio limitum: Hyginus p. 166f. Lachmann) wird von Varro …

Vogelschau

(411 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile
[English version] (ὀρνιθομαντεία/ ornithomanteía bzw. ὀρνιθοσκοπία/ ornithoskopía, auch ὀρνιθεία/ ornitheía; lat. auspicium, augurium; vgl. augures ; vgl. umbrisch aves anzeriaom). Divinationstechnik; die Deutung ergibt sich aus der Konstellation der visuellen und akustischen Zeichen (Vogelart, [Flug-]Bewegung; Vogellaute) und aus ihrer Einordnung in einen durch Umgrenzung definierten und durch Binnengliederung semantisch organisierten Raum (lat. templum ; Limitation I., pars antica, postica ). Die Lehre von der V. in It. ist, z. T. vermittelt über die Autoren zur Etr…

Numitor

(153 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile (Berlin)
[English version] (griech. u.a. Νεμέτωρ, Νομήτωρ). Figur aus der Sage um die Gründung Roms durch Romulus: älterer Sohn des Proca; Vater der Rhea Silvia; König von Alba Longa. Von seinem Bruder Amulius entthront, wird N. mit Hilfe seiner Enkel Romulus und Remus wieder eingesetzt (z.B. Liv. 1,3-6; Dion. Hal. ant. 1,71; 76-84; Plut. Romulus 3-8); dieses Ereignis markiert in der Erzählung den der Stadtgründung direkt vorausgehenden Zeitpunkt. N. wird in der Lit. zur Gesch. Roms zuerst bei Fabius Pictor (2. H. 3. Jh.v.Chr.) erwähnt, als dessen Quelle Diokles [7] von…

Aretalogien

(615 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile
[English version] Bezeichnung der mod. Forsch. für eine Gruppe ant. rel. Texte. Diese Bezeichnung ist (in Anschluß an [10]) angelehnt an griech. ἀρεταλογία/ aretalogía, “Lobpreis (der Taten und Eigenschaften eines Gottes)” (von aretḗ, hier “Wunder(-tat), Macht(-bereich)”, und légein, “reden”). Belege: LXX Sirach 36,19, um 180 v. Chr.; vgl. Strab. 17,1,17 (evtl. verderbt); pejorativ bei Manethon [2], Apotelesmatiká 4,447; vgl. lat. virtutes narrare: Ter. Ad. 535 f. Als Name einer Textgattung ist der Begriff “A.” in der Ant. nicht belegt; keine der unten a…

Volnius

(61 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile
[English version] Schriftsteller wohl des 1. Jh. v. Chr., der “etruskische Tragödien” ( tragoediae Tuscae) schrieb. V. war Gewährsmann Varros [2] (ling. 5,55; verfaßt um 45 v. Chr.) für die etr. Herkunft der Namen der ersten röm. tribus : tribus Titiensium, tribus Ramnium, tribus Lucerum. Haase, Mareile Bibliography C. O. Thulin, Die etr. Disciplin III, 1909 (Ndr. 1968), 48  W. Strzelecki, s. v. V., RE 9 A, 766 f.

Umbricius

(100 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile
[English version] C. U. Melior. Haruspex Caesarum, patronus municipii (AE 1930, Nr. 52; der Delphin als Worttrenner auf der Inschr. verortet wohl den Patronat in Tarent; haruspices mit Abb.; patronus D.). U. sagte Galba [2] am 15.1.69 aus Leberzeichen den Umsturz durch Otho unmittelbar voraus (Tac. hist. 1,27; Plut. Galba 24). Seine Fachschrift De Etrusca disciplina war die jüngste Quelle des Plinius [1] für (Vogel-)Prodigien (Plin. nat. 10; 11 index auct.; 10,19; [1]). Divination VII.; Etrusci III. D. Haase, Mareile Bibliography 1 D. Briquel, Sur un fragment d'U. Melior,…

Heracles

(515 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile
[German Version] Heracles, Lat. Hercules, a demigod (divine-human; son-god), the son of a mortal mother (Alcmene) and of two fathers, the god Zeus and the mortal man Amphitryon. Heracles emerges victorious from a series of struggles for the purification of the earth and the salvation of the human race (canonically known as the “Twelve Labors,” Gk ἄθλοι/ áthloi, Lat. labores). His apotheosis is interpreted as the reward for his exploits. The threshold between human and divine existence is marked by suffering (madness, immolation). The ambivalence of divi…

Catabasis

(159 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile
[German Version] – Greek κατάβασις (εἰς ῾Αιδου)/ katábasis ( eís Háidou), Lat. descensus/descensio ( ad inferos), descent (to the underworld; cf. also Descent into hell) – is the classical term for elements of certain myths, especially involving Odysseus (not explained in Hom Od. 11, ¶ but cf. 23.252: κατέβην/ katébēn) and Aeneas (Verg. Aen. 6; Hereafter, Concepts of the), as well as Orpheus, Heracles, and Theseus. It is also an element of some divination rituals (oracle of Trophonius: Pausanias 9.39). The reference to pictorial repr…

Etruscan/Italic Religions

(1,117 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile
[German Version] I. Etruscan Religions – II. “Italic Religions” I. Etruscan Religions 1. The culture of the Etruscans (self-designation: rasna, “populus”; Gr Tyrrhenoí, Tyrsenoí; Ital. Tursko-; Lat. Tusci, Etrusci) can be identified archaeologically c. 900–100 bce in central Italy between the Arno, the Tiber and the Tyrrhenian Sea (Tuscany), but from the perspective of the history of religions local differentiations are possible only with caution. 2. Sources on cultic institutions – archeological evidence: constitutive components…

Serapis

(316 words)

Author(s): Haase, Mareile
[German Version] (Gk Σέραπις, also Σάραπις, Sárapis). By ancient tradition, the image of the god Serapis was brought to Alexandria in response to a command given in a dream. The date of the transfer (under Ptolemy I, II, ¶ or III; Ptolemaic dynasty) and the image’s original location (Sinope, Seleucia, or Memphis) were already debated in ancient religious historiography (e.g. Tacitus Historiae IV 83f.). The name Serapis comes from Memphite local religion: it is derived from the Egyptian name for the Osirified form of the Memphite Apis bull ( wsyr-ḥp; attested since Ramses II), to whi…

Hereafter, Concepts of the

(5,151 words)

Author(s): Hutter, Manfred | Janowski, Bernd | Necker, Gerold | Haase, Mareile | Rosenau, Hartmut | Et al.
[German Version] I. Religious Studies – II. History of Religions – III. Philosophy of Religion – IV. Art History I. Religious Studies All cultures have concepts of a hereafter or beyond (“the next world”), although they are extremely diverse. They involve a realm of existence different from the visible earthly world but nevertheless thought of as real. Concepts of the hereafter are part of cosmology and therefore are related to the real world: the hereafter may be localized above or below the earth, in inaccessib…
▲   Back to top   ▲