Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Müller-Kessler, Christa" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Müller-Kessler, Christa" )' returned 58 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Ethiopian

(170 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Geez, the classical language of Ethiopia, actually belongs to the southern branch of Semitic languages. It was spoken by the tribes Agazjan and Ḥabas̆āt, which had migrated into Abyssinia from South Arabia, founded the kingdom of  Axum and in the middle of the 4th cent. AD were converted to Christianity by missionaries. The earliest evidence is stone inscriptions (Axum inscriptions, Maṭara obelisk 4th cent. AD). From the 9th cent. until the present Geez has been used only as a literary and church language. Related Semitic languages are Tigri…

Afro-Asiatic

(140 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Afro-Asian is a new linguistic term identical to the traditional term Hamito-Semitic. It covers all the major languages related to such language families as  (Ancient) Egyptian, Berber, Cushitic,  Semitic, Chadic (various subfamilies with more than 125 separate languages) and - often debated - Omotic. Overall, it includes more than 200 separate languages, many of them without writing, that can be traced over a period of almost 5,000 years. Reconstructing the proto-Afro-Asiatic lan…

Square script

(182 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] ( ketāḇ merubbā) is the term for the style of script in which Jewish Hebrew and Aramaic texts are written. It developed from the Aramaic square script style (in the Babylonian Talmud ketāḇ aššūrī, i.e. Assyrian script), which according to the Babylonian Talmud (Aboda Zara 10a) was brought from Babylonian captivity to Palestine by Jews in the post-Exilic period, whereas the Samaritan style developed from the palaeo-Hebraic script. The earliest documents extant in square script are fragments of the Biblical books …

Ešmūn

(78 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Old Phoenician deity, probably a  healing deity (> šmn, ‘Oil’), interpreted by the Greeks as  Asclepius and also as  Apollo. An important sanctuary of the cult of Esmun, which was widespread around the Mediterranean, was situated near Ṣidon ( Bustān aš-Šaiḫ). In Tyrus, Esmun was associated with  Melqart. Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography 1 E. Lipiński, s.v. E., DCPP, 158-160 2 R. Stucky, Die Skulpturen aus dem E.-Heiligtum bei Sidon: griech., röm., kypr. und phönik. Statuen vom 6. Jh. v.-3. Jh. n. Chr., 1993.

Official Aramaic

(393 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] OA (Egyptian Aramaic, standard literary Aramaic) was the language of administration and correspondence ( lingua franca) of the Achaemenid Empire from the time of Cyrus [2] II (6th-3rd cent. BC). OA does not represent a homogeneous Aramaic dialect but shows dialect characteristics that are  in parts highly divergent. OA was widespread throughout the whole of the Near East and Egypt and was used for a variety of textual genres. In a cursive writing (square script), OA is encountered on papyri and …

Semitic languages

(679 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] In 1781, A.L. Schloezer introduced this term for the languages which were associated with the sons of Sem/Shem (Gn 10:21-31; Semites) and which had a common origin with the so-called Hamitic languages of Africa. The term Hamito-Semitic is used interchangeably with Afro-Asiatic. Within the Hamito-Semitic languages, Akkadian, or rather Eblaite (mid-3rd millennium BC), is attested earliest in writing; Aramaic has the longest continuous written tradition; and modern Arabic is most widely spoken. In the literature, the division of the Semitic languages rem…

Punic

(258 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] is the later form of Phoenician found in the Phoenician colonies of North Africa, esp. Carthage, its far-flung trading centres on Malta, Sicily and Sardinia, in Italy, southern France, Spain, and - disseminated by trade - throughout almost the entire Mediterranean region. Initially, P. was indistinguishable in writing from Phoenician, but from approx. the 5th cent. BC, the first variant written forms begin to appear. The Semitic pharyngeal and laryngeal consonants were hardly used…

Am­mon­ite

(76 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Canaanite dialect very similar to  Phoenician and used by the Ammonites in the region around Rabbath Ammon. There is very little written evidence c. 9th-7th cents. BC): citadel inscriptions from Amman, writing on a receptacle (Tell Siran bottle) and approximately 150 stamping seals. Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography W. R. Garr, Dialect Geography of Syria-Palestina, 1000-586 B.C.E., 1985 L. Herr, The Scripts of Ancient Northwest Semitic Seals, 1978 K. P. Jackson, The Ammonite Language of the Iron Age, 1983.

Ugaritic

(259 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Term for a Semitic language, named after Ugarit, an important city and centre of the northern Syrian city state of the same name. The city of Ugarit was only discovered in 1928. Other than in Ugarit, texts written in Ugaritic have been found in Mīnā al-Baiḍā (the port of Ugarit), Ras Ibn Hāni and sporadically in other places, including Cyprus. Ugaritic represents an independent branch of the Semitic language family. Its precise classification is disputed by scholars of the Sem…

Arabic

(361 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] In contrast to  Ancient Southern Arabian, this is in fact Northern Arabic; it belongs to the northern branch of the Semitic languages. (Northern) Arabic personal names are found in Assyrian cuneiform sources from the 9th cent. onwards, with contemporaneous seals and short inscriptions in proto-Arabic script. Diverse early Northern Arabic dialects are written in modified Ancient Southern Arabian scripts (graffiti and tomb monument inscriptions), so  Thamudic (6th cent. BC - 4th cen…

Moabite

(80 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Language of the inhabitants of Moab, a country to the south of the Dead Sea; it is very similar to Hebrew. Moabite is recorded on seal inscriptions and on a 34-line inscription of King Meša of Moab ( c. 850 BC), which was found in the vicinity of Diban (KAI 181). Canaanite; Semitic languages Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography A. Dearman (ed.), Studies in the Mesha Inscription and Moab, 1989  W.R. Garr, Dialect Geography of Syria-Palestine, 1000-586 BCE, 1985.

Qumran Aramaic

(239 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] QA (= Hasmonaic) is the name given to the Aramaic in which the texts found in Qumran were written (1st cent. BC to 2nd cent. AD), which, however, are not quite uniform in their language. QA has the characteristics of a standardized literary language (which also reappears later in Aramaic Bible translations, such as Targum Onqelos, Targum Jonathan: note the pronouns and infinitives). Yet it also still had linguistic features based on Official Aramaic and also the Aramaic of the Bib…

Thamudic

(115 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Refers not only to an Early North Arabian dialect that is recorded in graffiti in a modified Ancient South Arabian script (6th cent. BC to 4th cent. AD) throughout the Arabian peninsula, but, according to the most recent state of scholarship, to various individual dialects, namely Taymanic (Early Thamudic A) and Hismaic (Early Thamudic E) and southern Thamudic B, C, D. Hence it cannot be associated with the Arab Θαμυδῖται/ Thamydȋtai tribe alone. Ancient Southern Arabian; Arabic Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography 1 M. C. A. MacDonald, Reflections…

Aramaic

(340 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Derives from the collective ethnic term for the  Arameans and belongs with  Canaanite to the north-western branch of the Semitic languages. For its system of writing, Aramaic adopted the Phoenician 22-character  alphabet. The most ancient form of the language is Old Aramaic (10th-8th cents. BC) found in inscriptions in North Mesopotamia and Syria (Tell Feḫerije [1], Arslantaš, with Aramaic-Assyrian bilingual inscriptions and Aramaic-Assyrian-Luwian hieroglyph trilingual inscriptio…

Phoenician

(204 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] was the language of the Phoenicians, and together with its later divergent form, Punic, it formed a unity within the Canaanite languages. Phoenician diversified into individual dialects which can only partly be classified according to their geographical areas (Byblus, Zincirli, Cyprus). The alphabet of 22 characters developed from proto-Canaanite. Initially, only consonants were written in its script, which deviated slightly from Aramaic. Written Phoenician sources (from the 13th/…

Aḥiqar

(195 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Aramaic name of the legendary keeper of the seal who served the Assyrian kings  Sanherib and  Asarhaddon (704-669 BC), mentioned in the Apocryphon Tob 1,21 f. (2,10; 11,17; 14,10, Ἀχιάχαρος; Achiácharos). Assyrian sources are not available. A late Babylonian cuneiform script ((2nd cent. BC) calls an Aba-enlil-dari by the Aramaic name of Ahuaqār [1. 215-218]. A. is the lead character of a biographical novel written in Official Aramaic on papyri (5th century BC) from  Elephantine. It contains wisdom sayings wr…

Hebrew

(247 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] The name of the Hebrew language is derived from the nomen gentile, also called ‘Hebrew’. This language belongs to the  Canaanite branch of Semitic languages. The 22 symbols of the epigraphical Old Hebrew alphabet developed from the proto-Canaanite  alphabet. The later Hebrew  square script was used only as a book hand. Hebrew developed over several linguistic stages, of which spoken Classical Hebrew, also defined as Old Hebrew, is preserved in inscriptions (10th-6th cents. BC) on stone, ostr…

Nabataean

(206 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Aramaic written language of an Arabic-speaking tribe, the Nabataeans (Arabic onomastikon). Nabataean belongs to the west-central branch of Aramaic, and is preserved in memorial, tomb, votive and building inscriptions, graffiti, coin legends and one charm, all dating from the 2nd cent. BC to the 4th cent. AD. Finds have been made at Gaza, Elusa, Mampsis, Nessana, Oboda, Petra, Transjordan with Amman and Gerasa, the Ḥaurān and Boṣra, the Arabian peninsula (Ḥiǧāẓ) with al-Ḥiǧr/Madāi…

Ancient Southern Arabian

(255 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] (ASA) Earlier known as Himyaritic after the tribe of the Ḥimyar ( Homeritae), this belongs with Ethiopian to the southern branch of the Semitic languages, but is not the same as (Northern) Arabian. There is evidence of four main dialects: c. 9th cent. BC to 6th cent. AD: Ḥadramautian, Minaean, Qataban and Sabaean, named after the centres of power of the same names. The dialects are divided into two groups relative to their causative prefix and the pronoun (3rd person sing. masc.): an h- (only Sabaean) and an s- group. There are further differences in terms of lexis …

Aḥiram

(63 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] King of Byblus ( c. 10th cent. BC), Phoenician for ‘my brother is exalted’. His coffin, decorated with reliefs of tribute scenes, commissioned by his son Ittobaal. It is significant from the point of view of art history. The inscription on the coffin lid is early evidence of the Phoenician  alphabet. Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography E. Lipiński, s. v. A., DCPP 11.

Edom­ite

(67 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Name of the language used by the residents of the country of  Edom ( Idumaea) south-east of the Dead Sea. Linguistically, E. should be placed between  Phoenician and  Hebrew. It is recorded in only a few inscriptions on ostraca and seals (7th/6th cents. BC).  Bersabe;  Canaanite Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography W. R. Garr, Dialect Geography of Syria-Palestine, 1985 L. Herr, The Scripts of Ancient Northwestsemitic Seals, 1978.

Hasai(ti)c

(63 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] early north-Arabic dialect ( Arabic). Its inscriptions, written in a slightly modified ancient south-Arabic  alphabet, are predominantly grave inscriptions, amongst them two Hasaitic-Aramaic  bilingual inscriptions from north-eastern Saudi Arabia ( c. between 5th and 2nd cents. BC).  Ancient south-Arabic;  Semitic languages Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography W. W. Müller, Das Altarab. und das klass. Arabisch, Hasaitisch, in: W.-D. Fischer (ed.), Grundriß der arab. Philol., 1982, 25-26.

Canaanite

(95 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Traditional general term for a dialect group of north-west Semitic, spoken and written in Syria, Palestine and in the Mediterranean ( c. 10th cent. BC to today; with proto-Canaanite precursors). Canaanite includes  Phoenician, the closely related  Ammonite,  Punic as a late further development of Phoenician,  Edomite as a link between Phoenician and  Hebrew (the Canaanite dialect passed down best and longest) and  Moabite, which is close to Hebrew. The existence of additional local dialects is still a matter of contention. Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bi…

Samaritan

(200 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Special form of Hebrew, in which the Samaritans (Samaria) wrote the Pentateuch and a revised version of the book of Joshua. The Samaritan Pentateuch, which is distinguished from the Masoretic Hebrew text by orthographic variants and religiously based textual changes, was earlier occasionally considered to represent a more original version; yet proto-Samaritan Hebrew text versions have been found in Qumran. The texts from Qumran - which are, with the exception of the Masada Fragmen…

Semites

(187 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] The term S., which was not introduced into scholarship until the 18th cent.,  goes back to Sem, the son of Noah in the 'Table of Nations' (Gn 10,21-31). Noah's sons named therein are regarded today as the eponymous heroes of various Semitic languages. In modern scholarship, the term S. is limited to linguistics; traditionally, scholarship has assumed a group of Semitic languages or a Semito-Hamitic language family (also known as Afro-Asiatic). Due to the unjustified expansion of t…

Syriac

(358 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[German version] Aramaic dialect from the geographical surroundings of Edessa [2], modern Urfa, which gave rise to the later Syriac literary language. Lexically, Syriac belongs to Central Aramaic just as the Aramaic of the Babylonian Targumim (Targum Onqelos and Jonathan), but already has Northeastern Aramaic features in its phonetics, morphology and syntax. The Early Syriac inscriptions (AD 6 - 3rd cent. AD), written in Estrangelā script, still have a strongly standardised Central Aramaic charact…

Reichsaramäisch

(346 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Als R. (Äg.-Aram., Standard-Literarisch-Aram.) wird die Verwaltungs- und Korrespondenzsprache ( lingua franca) des achäm. Reiches seit Kyros [2] II. (6.-3. Jh. v. Chr.) bezeichnet. Der Begriff steht nicht für einen homogenen aram. Dialekt, sondern für z. T. sehr divergierende dialektale Merkmale. Das R. war über ganz Vorderasien und Äg. verbreitet und wurde für die verschiedenartigsten Textgattungen gebraucht. In einer Kursive (Quadratschrift) begegnet das R. auf Papyri und Ostraka, die zum…

Zauberschalen

(338 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa
[English Version] . Einfache Keramikschalen mit Beschwörungstexten (Beschwörung), aus Wohnhäusern und Gräbern stammend, werden als Z. bez., die seit 1851 in großer Zahl in Mesopotamien (u.a. Nippur, Babylon, Borsippa, Kutha, Kiš, Ktesiphon, Ninive), im angrenzenden Huzistan (Susa) und vereinzelt in Syrien entdeckt werden. Die ca. in das 5. – 7.Jh. n.Chr. zu datierenden Texte sind überwiegend mit aram. (ass. AS 10a) Quadratschrift, viele auch in Mandäisch, seltener mit Estrangela, manichäischer Sch…

Samaritanisch

(176 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa
[English version] Sonderform des Hebräischen, in der die Samaritaner (Samaria) den Pentateuch und eine revidierte Version des Buches Jos abfaßten. Der samaritan. Pentateuch, der sich durch orthographische Varianten und rel. bedingte Textveränderungen vom masoretisch-hebr. Text unterscheidet, wurde früher gelegentlich diesem gegenüber als die ursprünglichere Version erachtet, doch tauchten in Qumran proto-samaritan. hebr. Textvarianten auf. Die Texte aus Qumran - mit Ausnahme des Masada-Fr. [1] nur…

Afroasiatisch

(138 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Als sprachwiss. Terminus ist eine neuere Bezeichnung für den identisch gebrauchten, traditionelleren Begriff Hamitosemitisch. Er umfaßt alle die zu den verwandten großen Sprachfamilien (Alt)-Ägypt., Berberisch, Kuschitisch, Semit., Tschadisch (mehrere Unterfamilien mit allein mehr als 125 Einzelsprachen) und - gelegentlich bestritten - Omotisch, gehörigen Sprachen. Ingesamt handelt es sich um mehr als 200, über einen Zeitraum von fast 5000 Jahren verfolgbare Einzelsprachen, die o…

Kanaanäisch

(86 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Traditioneller Oberbegriff für eine Dialektgruppe des NW-Semitischen, in Syrien, Palästina und im Mittelmeerraum gesprochen und geschrieben (ca. 10. Jh.v.Chr. bis heute; mit proto-k. Vorläufern). K. umfaßt das Phönizische, das eng mit ihm verwandte Ammonitische, das Punische als späte Weiterentwicklung des Phöniz., Edomitisch als Zwischenglied zwischen Phöniz. und Hebräisch (dem am längsten und am besten überlieferten k. Dialekt) und das dem Hebr. nahe Moabitische. Noch umstritten ist die Existenz weiterer lokaler Dialekte. Müller-Kessler, Christa …

Hebräisch

(215 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Der Begriff H. leitet sich vom Gentiliz “Hebräer” ab und gehört zur kanaanäischen Sprachgruppe des Semitischen. Das 22 Zeichen umfassende alt-hebr. Schriftsystem der Inschr. entwickelte sich aus dem protokanaanäischen Alphabet. Die spätere sogenannte hebr. Quadratschrift fand nur als Buchschrift Verwendung. Das H. umfaßt verschiedene Sprachstufen, gesprochenes klass. H., auch als Alt-H. definiert, das in Inschr. (10.-6. Jh. v.Chr.) auf Stein, Ostraka, Papyri, Metall und in den äl…

Ešmūn

(75 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Alte phönik. Gottheit, wohl Heilgott (> šmn, “Öl”), von den Griechen als Asklepios u. auch als Apollon interpretiert. Ein wichtiges Heiligtum des im Mittelmeerraum weit verbreiteten Kults des E. lag bei Ṣidon ( Bustān aš-Šaiḫ. In Tyros wurde E. mit Melqart assoziiert. Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography 1 E. Lipiński, s.v. E., DCPP, 158-160 2 R. Stucky, Die Skulpturen aus dem E.-Heiligtum bei Sidon: griech., röm., kypr. und phönik. Statuen vom 6. Jh. v.- 3. Jh. n.Chr., 1993.

Moabitisch

(71 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Sprache der Bewohner des Landes Moab südl. des Toten Meeres; steht dem Hebräischen am nächsten. Das M. ist durch eine 34zeilige Inschr. des Königs Meša von Moab (ca. 850 v.Chr.) aus der Nähe von Diban (KAI 181) und durch Siegelinschr. überliefert. Kanaanäisch; Semitische Sprachen Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography A. Dearman (Hrsg.), Studies in the Mesha Inscription and Moab, 1989  W.R. Garr, Dialect Geography of Syria-Palestine, 1000-586 B.C.E., 1985.

Phönizisch

(194 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] ist die Sprache der Phönizier, welche mit ihrem späteren Ableger und Fortläufer, dem Punischen, eine Einheit innerhalb der kanaanäischen Sprachgruppe (Kanaanäisch) bildet. Sie zerfällt in einzelne Dialekte, die sich nur teilweise nach ihrer geogr. Verbreitung (Byblos, Zincirli, Zypern) gliedern lassen. Das 22 Zeichen umfassende Alphabet entwickelte sich aus dem protokanaanäischen. Es wurde zunächst in einer rein lapidaren Konsonantenschrift geschrieben, die in ihrem Duktus leicht…

Qumranaramäisch

(213 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Als Q. (=Hasmonäisch) wird das Aramäische bezeichnet, in dem die aram. Textzeugnisse von Qumran abgefaßt wurden (1. Jh. v. bis 2. Jh. n. Chr.), die in ihrer Sprache jedoch nicht völlig einheitlich sind. Q. hat den Charakter einer standardisierten Literatursprache, die teilweise später in den aram. Bibelübersetzungen (Targum Onqelos, Targum Jonathan) wieder auftaucht (Pronomina, Infinitive), weist aber noch sprachliche Eigentümlichkeiten auf, die sich an das Reichsaramäische und B…

Altsüdarabisch

(236 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Früher nach dem Stamm der Ḥimjar (Homeritae) als Ḥimjaritisch bezeichnet, gehört neben dem Äthiopischen zum südl. Zweig der semit. Sprachen, ist aber mit dem (nord-) arab. nicht identisch. Vier Hauptdialekte sind nachweisbar: Ca. vom 9. Jh. v. Chr. - 6. Jh. n. Chr.: Ḥadramautisch, Minäisch, Qatabanisch und Sabäisch, benannt nach den gleichnamigen a. Machtzentren. Die Dialekte zerfallen in Bezug auf ihr Kausativ-Präfix und das Pronomen (3. Pers. Sg. Mask.) in eine h- (nur Sabäisch) und in eine s- Gruppe. Weitere Unterschiede sind lexikalischer und morpholo…

Edomitisch

(57 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Bezeichnung der Sprache der Bewohner des Landes Edom (Idumaea) südöstl. des Toten Meeres. Das E. ist zw. Phönikisch und Hebräisch einzuordnen. Es ist durch einige wenige Ostraka- und Siegelinschr. (7./6. Jh.v.Chr.) bezeugt. Bersabe; Kanaanäisch Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography W.R. Garr, Dialect Geography of Syria-Palestine, 1985  L. Herr, The Scripts of Ancient Northwestsemitic Seals, 1978.

Thamudisch

(100 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa
[English version] Bezieht sich nicht nur auf einen frühnordarabischen Dialekt, der in einer abgewandelten altsüdarab. Schrift in Graffiti (6. Jh. v. bis 4. Jh. n. Chr.) auf der ganzen arab. Halbinsel überl. ist, sondern nach neuestem Forsch.-Stand auf diverse Einzeldialekte, d. h. Taymanisch (Früh-Th. A) und Hismaisch (Früh-Th. E) sowie südl. Th. B, C, D. Er läßt sich daher nicht dem arab. Stamm der Θαμυδῖται/ Thamydítai allein zuordnen. Altsüdarabisch; Arabisch Müller-Kessler, Christa Bibliography 1 M. C. A. MacDonald, Reflections on the Linguistic Map of Pre-Is…

Semiten

(168 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa
[English version] Der erst im 18. Jh. n. Chr. in die Wiss. eingeführte Begriff S. bezieht sich auf Sem, den Sohn Noahs in der ‘Völkertafel (Gn 10,21-31). Noahs dort genannte Söhne gelten heute als hḗrōes epṓnymoi verschiedener semitischer Sprachen. Der Begriff S. ist in der mod. Wiss. hauptsächlich auf den sprachwiss. Aspekt beschränkt; man geht traditionellerweise von einer Gruppe der semit. Sprachen bzw. einer semitisch-hamitischen Sprachfamilie (auch Afroasiatisch) aus. Durch ungerechtfertigte Ausdehnung des Begriffs auf ve…

Hasaitisch

(59 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] (Hasäisch), frühnordarab. Dial. (Arabisch). Seine Inschr., in einem leicht abgewandelten altsüdarab. Alphabet geschrieben, sind vorwiegend Grabinschr., darunter zwei hasait.-aram. Bilinguen, aus dem nö Saudiarabien (ca. zw. 5. u. 2. Jh. v.Chr.). Altsüdarabisch; Semitische Sprachen Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography W.W. Müller, Das Altarab. und das klass. Arabisch, Hasaitisch, in: W.-D. Fischer (Hrsg.), Grundriß der arab. Philol., 1982, 25-26.

Aḥiram

(53 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] König von Byblos (ca. 10. Jh. v. Chr.), phöniz. “mein Sohn ist erhaben”. Sein reliefverzierter, von seinem Sohn Ittobaal in Auftrag gegebener Sarkophag (Tributszenen), ist kunstgesch. bedeutend. Die Inschr. auf dem Deckel ist ein frühes Zeugnis des phöniz. Alphabets. Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen) Bibliography E. Lipiński, s. v. A., DCPP 11.

Nabatäisch

(181 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Die aramäische Schriftsprache des arabisch sprechenden Stamms der Nabatäer (arab. Onomastikon). Sie gehört zur west-mittelaram. Sprachstufe und ist vom 2. Jh.v.Chr. bis 4. Jh.n.Chr. in Gedenk-, Grab-, Votiv- und Bauinschr., Graffiti und Mz.-Legenden sowie einer Beschwörung überl. Fundorte sind Gaza, Elusa, Mampsis, Nessana, Oboda, Petra, Transjordanien mit Amman und Gerasa, der Ḥaurān und Boṣra, die arab. Halbinsel (Ḥiǧāẓ) mit al-Ḥiǧr/Madāin Ṣāliḥ, Madīna, Taimā, vereinzelt ent…

Ugaritisch

(212 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa
[English version] Bezeichnung für eine semitische Sprache, benannt nach dem erst 1928 entdeckten Ugarit, der Residenzstadt des gleichnamigen nordsyrischen Stadtstaates. In U. verfaßte Texte wurden außer in Ugarit noch in Mīnā al-Baiḍā (Hafenstadt von Ugarit), Ras Ibn Hāni und vereinzelt an anderen Orten, darunter auch auf Zypern, gefunden. Das U. stellt einen unabhängigen semit. Sprachtyp dar, dessen Zuordnung u. a. wegen seiner Verbalstämme und fehlender Vokalisation in der semit. Sprachforsc…

Syrisch

(313 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa
[English version] Aram. Dialekt aus dem geogr. Umfeld von Edessa [2], h. Urfa, aus dem sich die spätere syrische Lit.-Sprache entwickelte. S. zählt lexikalisch zum Zentralaramäischen wie das Aram. der babylonischen Targumim (Targum Onqelos und Jonathan), zeigt aber in Phonetik, Morphologie und Syntax bereits nordost-aram. Züge. Die frühen syr. Inschr. (6 n. Chr. - 3. Jh. n. Chr.), verfaßt in der Estrangelā-Schrift, weisen einen noch stark standardisierten zentral-aram. Charakter auf. Zu ihnen zähl…

Äthiopisch

(157 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Eigentlich Geez, die klassische Sprache Äthiopiens, gehört zum südl. Zweig der semit. Sprachen. Gesprochen wurde es von den Stämmen Agazjan und Ḥabas̆āt, die aus Südarabien nach Abessinien eingewandert waren, dort das Königtum Aksum gründeten und Mitte des 4. Jh. n. Chr. von aram. Missionaren zum Christentum bekehrt wurden. Die ersten Nachweise sind Steininschr. (Aksuminschr., Maṭara Obelisk 4. Jh. n. Chr.). Seit dem 9. Jh. bis heute wird Geez nur noch als Lit.- und Kirchensprache verwendet. Semit.-ä. Sprachen im Norden sind Tigriña un…

Arabisch

(330 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Im Unterschied zum Altsüd-A. eigentlich Nord-A.; gehört zum nördl. Zweig der semit. Sprachen. Ab dem 9. Jh. v. Chr. begegnen (nord-) a. Personennamen in assyr. Keilschriftquellen, zeitgleich Siegel und kurze Inschr. in proto-a. Schrift. Diverse frühe nord-a. Dial. sind in modifizierten altsüd-a. Schriften (Graffiti und Grabinschr.) verfaßt, so Thamudisch (6. Jh. v. - 4. Jh. n. Chr.; Inschr. aus Teima), Ṣafaitisch (1. Jh. v. - 3. Jh. n. Chr.), Liḥjānisch (frühe Stufe Dedān, 5. Jh.…

Semitische Sprachen

(604 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa
[English version] Der Begriff wurde durch A. L. Schloezer 1781 für die Sprachen eingeführt, die man den Söhnen Sems (Gn 10,21-31; Semiten) zuordnete und die mit den sog. hamitischen Sprachen Afrikas einen gemeinsamen Ursprung aufweisen. Gleichbedeutend mit Semito-Hamitisch wird die Bezeichnung Afroasiatisch verwendet. Die älteste schriftlich überl. Sprache ist das Akkadische bzw. das Eblaitische (Mitte 3. Jt. v. Chr.), die am längsten überl. das Aramäische, die am weitesten verbreitete das heutige Arabische. In der wiss. Lit. wird die Unterteilung der s.S. kontr…

Quadratschrift

(165 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Als Q. ( ketāḇ merubbā) wird der Schriftduktus bezeichnet, in dem hebr. und aram. jüdische Schriften geschrieben sind. Die Q. entwickelte sich aus dem aram. Q.-Duktus (im babylonischen Talmud ketāḇ aššūrī, d. h. assyr. Duktus), den die Juden nach Aussage des babylon. Talmuds (Aboda Zara 10a) in der nachexilischen Zeit aus der babylon. Gefangenschaft mit nach Palaestina brachten, wohingegen aus der paläohebr. Schrift der samaritanische Duktus entstand. Die ersten Dokumente in Q. sind Fr. der biblischen Bücher…

Aramäisch

(323 words)

Author(s): Müller-Kessler, Christa (Emskirchen)
[English version] Leitet sich von der ethnischen Sammelbezeichnung der Aramäer ab und gehört neben dem Kanaanäischen zum nordwestl. Zweig der semit. Sprachgruppe. Als Schriftsystem übernahm das A. das 22 Zeichen umfassende phöniz. Alphabet. Die älteste Sprachstufe ist das Alt-A. (10. - 8. Jh. v. Chr.) mit Inschr. aus Nord-Mesopotamien und Syrien (Tell Feḫerije [1], Arslantaš, mit a.-assyr. Bilingue bzw. a.-assyr.-hieroglyphen-luw. Trilingue, Tell Ḥalaf, Breğ, Zinçirli, Staatsvertrag von Tell Sfire…
▲   Back to top   ▲