Search

Your search for 'dc_creator:( "Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)" ) OR dc_contributor:( "Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)" )' returned 60 results. Modify search

Sort Results by Relevance | Newest titles first | Oldest titles first

Potters

(912 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] I. Introduction, origins, social position The potter (κεραμεύς/ kerameús, Lat. figulus) carried out his artistic work at the potter's wheel and in the creation of clay patrices (prototypes), models and sculptural ornamentation, though the profession included production processes such as mining and preparing the clay, painting, firing and selling the products. Despite at times enjoying good economic circumstances, the potter’s position in society remained modest; in Athens he was ranked amongst the thêtes , zeugîtai or metics ( métoikos

Pottery trade

(535 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] In Antiquity, manufacturers of simple utilitarian pottery generally met only the local demand of their region, while finer, decorated ceramics were also intended for the transregional market. However, the latter could also stimulate the export of poorer goods. The distribution of pottery finds in many cases indicates corresponding trade links, but there are also other factors to consider: the extended find radius of Mycenaean pottery is more a reflection of the presence of Mycenae…

Pyxis

(244 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (ἡ πυξίς; hē pyxís). Box, round container with a lid; the Hellenistic name is derived from πύξος/ pýxos (‘box tree wood’), from which pyxides were often fashioned; the older Attic name is probably κυλιχνίς/ kylichnís. Pyxides are predominantly preserved as ceramics, more rarely made of wood, alabaster, metal or ivory. Among other things, pyxides were used for storing cosmetics and jewellery, so they were part of the life of women, the preferred motive in the red-figured style being portrayals of women's rooms; the…

Lebes

(280 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
(ὁ λέβης; ho lébēs). [German version] [1] Large cauldron Large cauldron, a bronze vessel used from the Mycenaean period to heat water and cook meals, in Homer aside from the phiale and trivet a popular prize ( Prizes (games)) (Hom. Il. 9,122; 23,267; 613; 762), also made of precious metal. The addition ápyros (ἄπυρος) describes either new lébētes or those used as kraters. Bronze kettles decorated with protomes from the 7th-6th cents. BC that can be removed from the stand go back to Oriental models (Griffin cauldron). Aside from these splendid cauldro…

Kylix

(303 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (ἡ κύλιξ; hē kýlix). General ancient term for a wine goblet; mentioned in inscriptions are both goblets and skyphoi as well as flat drinking bowls. As a technical term, kylix is today only used for the latter. As a bowl, made of clay, with high foot and two horizontal handles, the kylix originated in the 6th cent. BC, probably derived from Laconian examples. It could be handled particularly well when lying down; it is no coincidence that it follows Oriental banquet customs. Early forms from the 8th and 7th cents., with a low foot,…

Kernos

(255 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (ὁ or τὸ κέρνος; ho or tò kérnos). According to Ath. 11,476f; 478d, a cult vessel with added kotyliskoi (drinking cups), which contained poppy seed, wheat, lentils, honey, oil, etc. (similar to panspermia). Kernoi were carried around in processions and their contents finally eaten by the bearers ( mystai). Kernoi with attached lights are also mentioned (sch. Nic. Alex. 217). Kernoi were used in cults of fertility and mother goddesses, especially in that of Rhea Cybele. Larger quantities of clay pots with wreaths of kotylai ( Vessels fig. E 15), which are assumed to be kerno…

Vase painters

(697 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] The collective term 'vases' for Greek painted pottery (II. A.) as a special sub-genre of ceramics characterized by its often rich decoration emerged in the 18th cent. when the first vasi antichi were discovered in Campania and Etruria. Since their decoration was the task of the potter, no ancient word exists for the profession of vase painters (VP), although they could mark their work with the signature ἔγραψεν/ égrapsen ('has painted'). The first signatures of VP appear on early archaic, Cycladic and Corinthian pottery. In Athens, the earliest example is Sophil…

Askos

(157 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
(ἀσκός; askós). [German version] [1] Wineskin Leather wineskin. Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld) [German version] [2] Vessel type Collective archaeological term for closed vessels with stirrup handle and spout ( Vessel forms). Larger ‘sack pots’ as early as the Bronze Age; askoi in the form of birds and ducks mainly in the 8th cent. BC, also present in Etruria. Loops handles suggest flasks, pictorial representations, drinking vessels. The small, black-varnished or red-figured askoi of the 5th-4th cents. BC in the form of skins, or lenticular or ring-shaped, probably…

Figurine vases

(418 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] Vases worked three-dimensionally using a combination of techniques; figurine vases made by coroplasts, often originating from the same moulds as the statuettes (terracottas). Precursors in Anatolia, Egypt and the Ancient Orient. Greek figurine vases of clay (birds, cattle, horses) in greater numbers from the 14th cent. BC. [1]. Vast production of ointment vessels with glazed clay painting in the 7th-6th cents. BC e.g. in Corinth [2], Rhodes [3] and Boeotia: complete figures, busts…

Krater

(388 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (ὁ κρατήρ/ ho kratḗr from κεράννυμι, keránnymi, ‘to mix’; Linear B: acc. ka-ra-te-ra). Wide-mouthed vessel for mixing water and wine, used at banquets (Hom. Od. 1,110), as well as in sacrificial rites (Hom. Il. 3,269) and religious festivals (Hdt. 1,51). Gyges, Alyattes and Croesus are supposed to have donated splendid large kraters of precious metal to Delphi. Their capacity was given in amphorae (Hdt. 1,51; 70; cf. Hom. Il. 23,741; Amphora [2]), their value measured according to weight (Hdt. 1,14; cf. Plin. HN 33,15). Supports for kraters ( hypokratērídia, hypóstata…

Psykter

(150 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (ὁ ψυκτήρ; ho psyktḗr). Vessel made of clay or bronze for keeping wine cool. Occasionally double-walled craters and amphoras served this purpose in the 6th cent. BC. In about 530 BC a mushroom-shaped psykter was invented in Athens (Pottery, shapes and types of, ill. C 8) and was subsequently manufactured in numerous red-figure workshops (Oltus, Euphronius [2], Euthymides). Its earlier forms are considered to be black-figured jugs and amphoras with cylindrical hollow feet. The style continued until c. 470 BC (Pan painter). Pictorial representations most com…

Alabastron

(106 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (ἀλάβαστρον, ἀλάβαστος; alábastron, alábastos). Slender perfume bottle without a base whose contents were accessed with small sticks ( Pottery). Examples of clay, precious metal, glass and lead have been found. Egyptian precursors, made of alabaster, imported into Greece in early times. Greek clay alabastra already around 600 BC in east Ionia; deviating from that the proto-Corinthian pouch version. Rich production of painted clay alabastra in Attica around 550-450 BC. In late classical times, larger stone alabastra served as grave decoration. Scheibler, Inge…

Epinetron

(114 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (ἐπίνητρον; epínētron). A curved cover, wrongly referred to as ónos (ὄνος), for the protection of thighs and knees during the cleaning and combing of wool; according to Hesychius s.v., the epinetron was used to card the fibres, but more likely to prepare the rovings (see illustr.). Epinetra were generally made from clay or wood; some painted clay epinetra from the 5th cent. BC are extant.  Eretria Painter Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld) Bibliography A. Lezzi-Hafter, Der Eretria-Maler, 1988, 253-262 A. Pekridou-Gorecki, Mode im antiken Griechenland, 1989, 16-20. Re…

Choes pitchers [CP]

(153 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] Type three wine pitchers ( Pottery, shapes and types of;  Chuos), used in Athens in drinking competitions on the day of Choes during the  Anthesteria. Not firmly identified with clay pitchers of similar size painted with freely chosen motifs. More easily differentiated are the small CP (5-15 cm high) produced in great numbers c. 400 BC. These bore images of children, pointing to sources that suggest the Choes as marking an important transition point in children's lives (IG II/III2 13139, 1368 l. 127-131). Some feast scenes, moreover, point to rites involv…

Everyday crockery

(340 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] Modern archaeological term for the coarser ceramics in everyday use, a definition blurred by the fact that black glaze ceramics,  terra sigillata, and sometimes even painted fine ceramics were put to everyday use. However, as a pottery product, everyday crockery is clearly distinguishable from the latter three. The handle, rim, and foot profiles are less clearly defined; the outside of vessels is mostly unslipped or only thinly glazed and perfunctorily decorated. In contrast with …

Kalos inscriptions

(715 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] The Greek custom of publicly praising someone's beauty using the epithet kalós (καλός, masc. = ‘beautiful’), less commonly kalḗ (καλή, fem.) is particularly evident in Attic vase inscriptions - made before the firing of the vessels - from the 6th and 5th cents. [1; 5]. Spontaneous graffiti [3] on vases can also be found, as well as other public kalos inscriptions (KI) [4. 22, 46-65] (schol. Aristoph. Vesp. 98). They stem from an interest in beautiful youths, also expressed in early Greek lyric poetry, and in the pederastic conventions of the time, but also in the ideal of kalo…

Loutrophoros

(398 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (ἡ λουτροφόρος; hē loutrophóros). Container for, or carrier of, bathing water. Mentioned by Dem. Or. 44,18 as a structure on top of a tomb showing the unmarried status of the deceased. Only late ancient and Medieval authors go into details about the loutrophoros as a wedding vessel and about the antique custom of erecting a monument ( mnḗma) in the form of a loutrophoros for the unmarried deceased ( ágamoi). This was apparently intended as a symbolic reconstruction of the bridal bath and wedding ( Wedding customs and rituals). The loutrophoros is d…

Stamnos

(163 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (στάμνος/ stámnos). Storage jar for wine, oil, etc.; mercantile inscriptions point to the pelike (Pottery, shapes and types of, fig. A 8); today an archaeological term for a bulbous lidded vessel with a recessed neck and handles on the shoulders (Pottery, shapes and types of, fig. C 6). First instances in Laconia and Etruria in the Archaic Period, adopted in Athens around 530 BC, in the 5th cent. almost exclusively exported from there to Etruria. Depictions on red-figured stámnoi show it as a central wine vessel in a Dionysian women's festival, though th…

Lekythos

(391 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (ἡ λήκυθος; hē lḗkythos). Greek generic term for ointment and oil vessels of various shapes and sizes with a narrow opening, also comprising the alabastron and aryballos ; based on schol. Pl. Hp. mi. 368C, today in particular a term for Attic funerary vessels from the 6th and 5th cents. BC that contained aromatic oil donations and were a popular gift for the dead ( Vessel, shapes and types of fig. E 3). As the white-ground lekythoi grew bigger, small insets for saving oil became common in the 5th cent. Around 400 BC, a group of Attic monumental clay lekythoi obviously formed th…

Pottery, shapes and types of

(2,241 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] A. Forms, functions, names The variety of ancient pottery (ἀγγεῖον/ angeîon; vas) results primarily from the diversity of uses, such as transport, storage, scooping, pouring, mixing of solid or fluid contents (functional shapes) and secondarily from differences of form determined by period and region (types). The functional shape indicates only the basic functional structure, which is given its concrete expression only by a type. The fixed functional characteristics of an amphora (cf. fig. A…

Hydria

(287 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (ἡ ὑδρία; hē hydría). Water jug with three handles and a narrow mouth, as it is described in the inscription of the Troilus scene on the Clitias Krater (Florence, MA). The form occurs already in Early Helladic ceramics and on Mycenaean clay tablets from  Pylos (called ka-ti). The older rounded form was replaced in the 6th cent. BC, now in bronze and silver as well, by the elongated shoulder hydria and a bit later by the kalpis with continuous profile ( Vessels fig. B 11-12). Very slender hydriae still existed in the 4th cent. BC and into the Hellenistic …

Aryballos

(80 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
(ἀρύβαλλος; arýballos). [German version] [1] Leather bag Leather bag. Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld) [German version] [2] Spherical container Technical term for spherical containers of ointment ( lekythos), worn on an athlete's wrist; they have survived in clay, faience, bronze and silver. Originating in Corinth, the form reached Sparta and Rhodes in the 6th cent. BC, and subsequently Attica. Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld) Bibliography N. Kunisch, Eine neue Fikellura-Vase, in: AA 1972, 558-565 (typology) G. Schwarz, Addenda zu Beazleys ”Aryballoi“, in: JÖAI 54, 198…

Dinos

(18 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] Wrong term for a cauldron ( Pottery, shapes and types of;  Lebes). Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)

Skyphos

(104 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (ὁ/τὸ σκύφος; h o/tò skýphos). Tall but stable drinking cup with two handles usually attached horizontally, originally a rustic wooden beaker (Ath. 11,498-500). The synonym κοτύλη/ kotýlē is generally used as a term for a cup of no fixed typology. The capacity of a skyphos was between a kotyle [2] and a chous [1]. As a wine vessel, it is attested more frequently for komasts than for symposiasts. Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld) Bibliography F. Leonard, s. v. Kotyle (1), RE 11, 1542-1546  B. A. Sparkes, L. Talcott, Black and Plain Pottery (Agora 12), 1970, 81-87,…

Lutrophoros

(308 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] (ἡ λουτροφόρος). Behälter für bzw. Träger/-in von Badewasser. Von Demosth. or. 44,18 als Grabaufsatz erwähnt, der den unverheirateten Status des Verstorbenen beweise. Erst spätant. und ma. Autoren gehen auf die L. als Hochzeitsgefäß und die ant. Sitte ein, den unverheiratet Verstorbenen ( ágamoi) ein Denkmal ( mnḗma) in Form einer L. zu errichten, was offenbar den Sinn eines symbolischen Nachvollzugs von Brautbad und Hochzeit (Hochzeitsbräuche) hatte. Die L. wird hier einerseits als Gefäß (Hesych. s.v.; Eust. zu Hom. Il. 23,…

Phiale

(338 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (φιάλη; phiálē). In Homeric times, the term for a kettle (Lebes), basin, vessel in general. Later it was used only for a bowl without a foot and handle, which - in contrast to the Ancient Near Eastern model - was equipped with an omphalos, for better handling. An omphalos was a central concavity of the base into which a finger could be inserted from below. The use of the term phiale to indicate this shape is attested as early as the 7th cent. BC. According to literary and pictorial…

Lagynos

(104 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] (ὁ/ἡ λάγυνος; ho/ hē lágynos). Wine bottle with handle, wide flat body, high narrow neck and sealable mouth (see Vessels, shapes and types of, fig. B 10). A Hellenistic type of vessel prevalent up to and into the Imperial period. Every participant in the lagynophória (λαγυνοφόρια), a Dionysiac street festival in Alexandria, brought along a lagynos for his share of wine (Ath. 7,276a-c). Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld) Bibliography G. Leroux, L., 1913 F. v. Lorentz, s.v. L., RE Suppl. 6, 216f. R. Pierobon, L. Funzione e forma, in: Riv. Studi Liguri 45, 1979, 27-50 S. I. Rotro…

Alabastron

(87 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] (ἀλάβαστρον, ἀλάβαστος). Schlankes, fußloses Parfümgefäß, dessen Inhalt mit Stäbchen entnommen wurde (Gefäßformen). Erh. in Ton, Edelmetall, Glas, Blei. Ägypt. Vorläufer aus Alabaster früh in Griechenland importiert. Griech. Ton-A. schon um 600 v. Chr. in Ostionien; abweichend die protokorinth. Beutelform. In Attika reiche Produktion bemalter Ton-A. um 550-450 v. Chr. Größere Stein-A. dienten in der Spätklassik als Grabaufsatz. Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld) Bibliography D. A. Amyx, Attic Stelai, in: Hesperia 27, 1958, 213-217 (Quellen)  K. Schauenbur…

Epinetron

(102 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] (ἐπίνητρον). Fälschlich ónos (ὄνος) genannte gewölbte Unterlage, die beim Reinigen und Kämmen roher Wolle Oberschenkel und Knie schützte; nach Hesychios s.v. wurde auf dem e. der Faden aufgerauht; richtiger wohl das Vorgarn hergestellt (s. Abb.). Epinetra waren in der Regel aus Ton oder Holz; erh. sind u.a. bemalte Ton- e. des 5. Jh.v.Chr. Eretria-Maler Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld) Bibliography A. Lezzi-Hafter, Der Eretria-Maler, 1988, 253-262  A. Pekridou-Gorecki, Mode im ant. Griechenland, 1989, 16-20. Abb.-Lit.: C.H.E. Haspels, A Fragmentary Onos i…

Gebrauchskeramik

(296 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] Moderner arch. t.t. für gröbere Keramik des alltägl. Gebrauchs, der insofern unscharf bleibt, als auch Schwarzfirniskeramik, Terra Sigillata und zuweilen selbst bemalte Feinkeramik alltägl. Zwecken dienten. Als keramisches Produkt setzt sich die G. jedoch deutlich von diesen ab. Henkel, Rand- und Fußprofile sind weniger scharf geformt, außen sind die Gefäße meist tongrundig, bzw. nur mit dünnem Überzug oder flüchtiger Verzierung versehen. Im Gegensatz zur häufig exportierten Fein…

Askos

(137 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
(ἀσκός). [English version] [1] Weinschlauch Weinschlauch aus Leder. Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld) [English version] [2] Gefäß Archäologische Sammelbezeichnung geschlossener Gefäße mit Bügelhenkel und Tülle (Gefäßformen). Größere “Sackkannen” schon in der Bronzezeit; A. in Vogel- und Entengestalt vorwiegend im 8.Jh. v.Chr., auch in Etrurien verbreitet. Tragösen weisen auf Feldflaschen, bildliche Darstellungen auf Trinkgefäße. Speiseöl enthielten vermutlich die kleinen, schwarz gefirnisten oder rf. verzierten A.…

Pyxis

(206 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] (ἡ πυξίς). Büchse, runder Behälter mit Deckel; die hell. Bezeichnung ist abzuleiten von πύξος/ pýxos (“Buchsbaumholz”), aus dem Pyxiden häufig gedrechselt wurden; die ältere att. Bezeichnung ist wahrscheinlich κυλιχνίς/ kylichnís. Erh. sind P. vorwiegend als Keramik, seltener in Holz, Alabaster, Metall oder Elfenbein. P. dienten u. a. zur Aufbewahrung von Kosmetika und Schmuck, sie gehörten also zum Leben der Frau und tragen im rf. Stil bevorzugt Frauengemachszenen; entsprechend beliebt sind sie als Grabbeig…

Dinos

(13 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] Falsche Bez. für Kessel (Gefäßformen; Le-bes). Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)

Kernos

(208 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] (ὁ oder τὸ κέρνος). Nach Athen. 11,476f; 478d ein Kultgefäß mit angefügten Kotylisken (Näpfen), die Mohn, Weizen, Linsen, Honig, Öl u.ä. (nach Art einer Panspermie) enthielten. K. wurden in der Prozession umhergetragen, ihr Inhalt zuletzt von den Trägern (Mysten) verzehrt. Auch K. mit aufgesteckten Lichtern werden erwähnt (Sch. Nik. Alex. 217). Verwendet wurden K. in Kulten von Fruchtbarkeits- und Muttergottheiten, bes. der Rhea Kybele. Größere Mengen von Tonschüsseln mit Kotylen…

Choenkannen

(121 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] Weinkannen des Typus 3 (Gefäßformen; Chus), in Athen beim Wettrinken am Choentag der Anthesterien verwendet. Nicht sicher identisch mit bemalten Tonkannen gleicher Größe, deren Bildthemen frei gewählt sind. Besser abzugrenzen die um 400 v.Chr. zahlreich produzierten kleinen Ch. (H 5-15 cm). Ihre Kinderbilder weisen auf Quellen, die von den Choen als wichtigem Einschnitt im Leben des Kindes sprechen (IG II/III2 13139, 1368 Z. 127-131). Einige Festszenen deuten zudem auf Kinderriten am Choentag. Kleine Ch. dienten wohl als Kindergabe zum …

Kylix

(236 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] (ἡ κύλιξ). Allg. ant. Bez. für Weinkelch; inschr. benannt sind sowohl Kelche und Skyphoi wie flache Trinkschalen; t.t. ist K. h. nur für letztere. Die getöpferte Schale mit hohem Fuß und zwei Horizontalhenkeln entstand im 6. Jh.v.Chr., wohl nach lakon. Vorbildern. Sie ließ sich bes. gut im Liegen handhaben und folgt nicht zufällig der Verbreitung oriental. Gelagesitten. Vorformen des 8. und 7. Jh. mit niedrigem Fuß sind att. spätgeom. Tierfriesschalen sowie ostion. früharcha. Kel…

Figurengefäße

(369 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] In kombinierten Techniken plastisch gearbeitete Gefäße; F. von Koroplasten, oft aus gleichen Matrizen wie die Statuetten stammend (Terrakotten). Vorläufer in Anatolien, Ägypten und im Alten Orient. Griech. F. aus Ton (Vögel, Rinder, Pferde) vermehrt seit dem 14. Jh. v.Chr. [1]. Reiche Produktion von Salbgefäßen mit Glanztonbemalung im 7.-6. Jh. v.Chr. u.a. in Korinth [2], Rhodos [3] und Böotien: ganze Figuren, Büsten, Köpfe, Glieder, Tiere, Tierprotomen, Mischwesen, Früchte [4]. …

Keramikhandel

(471 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] Hersteller einfacher Gebrauchskeramik deckten in der Ant. in der Regel lediglich den lokalen Bedarf ihrer Region, während verzierte Feinkeramik auch für überregionale Absatzgebiete bestimmt war, allerdings den Export von schlechterer Ware nach sich ziehen konnte. Die Fundverbreitung von Keramik deutet vielfach auf entsprechende Handelskontakte, kann aber auch andere Gründe haben; der ausgedehnte Fundradius myk. Keramik etwa reflektiert eher die Präsenz myk. Siedler. Mit dem im 8.…

Lebes

(219 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
(ὁ λέβης). [English version] [1] Großer Kessel Großer Kessel, seit myk. Zeit zum Erhitzen von Wasser und Kochen von Speisen bezeugtes Br.-Gefäß, bei Homer neben Phiale und Dreifuß ein beliebter, auch in Edelmetall gefertigter Kampfpreis (Hom. Il. 9,122; 23,267; 613; 762). Der Zusatz ápyros (ἄπυρος) bezeichnet entweder neuwertige oder als Kratere dienende lébētes. Mit Protomen verzierte, vom Ständer abnehmbare Br.-Kessel des 7.-6. Jh.v.Chr. gehen auf oriental. Vorbilder zurück (Greifenkessel). Neben diesen Prunkkesseln entsteht eine kleinere, glat…

Lagynos

(86 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] (ὁ/ἡ λάγυνος). Weinflasche mit Henkel, breitem, flachem Körper, hohem, engem Hals und verschließbarer Mündung (Gefäßformen Abb. B 10). Bis in die Kaiserzeit reichender hell. Gefäßtypus. An den lagynophória (λαγυνοφόρια), einem dionysischen Straßenfest in Alexandreia, brachte jeder Festteilnehmer eine L. für seinen Weinanteil mit (Athen. 7,276a-c). Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld) Bibliography G. Leroux, L., 1913  F. v. Lorentz, s.v. L., RE Suppl. 6, 216f.  R. Pierobon, L. Funzione e forma, in: Riv. Studi Liguri 45, 1979, 27-50  S.I. Rotroff, Hellenistic Pot…

Aryballos

(73 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
(ἀρύβαλλος). [English version] [1] Lederbeutel Lederbeutel. Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld) [English version] [2] Salbgefäß T.t. für kugelige Salbgefäße (Lekythos), vom Athleten am Handgelenk getragen, erh. in Ton, Fayence, Bronze, Silber. Entstanden in Korinth, gelangte die Form im 6. Jh. v.Chr. nach Sparta und Rhodos, später auch nach Attika. Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld) Bibliography N. Kunisch, Eine neue Fikellura-Vase, in: AA 1972, 558-565 (Typologie)  G. Schwarz, Addenda zu Beazleys "Aryballoi", in: JÖAI 54, 1983, 27-32.

Gefäße, Gefäßformen/-typen

(1,942 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] A. Form, Funktion, Name Die Vielfalt ant. G. (ἀγγεῖον; vas) resultiert primär aus diversen Verwendungszwecken wie Transport, Lagerung, Schöpfen, Gießen, Mischen von festen oder flüssigen Gefäßinhalten (Zweckformen), sekundär aus zeitl. und regional bedingten Unterschieden der Gestaltung (Typen). Mit der Zweckform ist ledigl. die funktionale Grundstruktur angegeben, die erst durch Typen ihre konkreten Ausprägungen erfährt. Zur Amphora (vgl. Abb. A) gehören als feste funktionale Merkmale zw…

Hydria

(250 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] (ἡ ὑδρία). Dreihenkliger Wasserkrug mit enger Mündung, wie er inschr. in der Troilos-Szene des Klitias-Kraters (Florenz, AM) als H. bezeichnet ist. Die Form kommt schon in der FH-Keramik und auf myk. Tontafeln von Pylos vor (dort mit der Bezeichnung ka-ti). Die ältere Kugelform wurde im 6. Jh. v.Chr., nun auch in Bronze und Silber, durch die gestreckte Schulter-H. und etwas später die “Kalpis” mit durchlaufendem Profil abgelöst (Gefäße Abb. B 11-12). Sehr schlanke H. gab es noch im 4. Jh. v.Chr. bis in den Hell.; in d…

Psykter

(137 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] (ὁ ψυκτήρ). Gefäß aus Ton oder Br. zum Kühlhalten von Wein. Vereinzelt dienten diesem Zweck im 6. Jh. v. Chr. doppelwandige Kratere und Amphoren. Um 530 v. Chr. wurde in Athen ein pilzförmiger Ps. erfunden (Gefäße, Gefäßformen, Abb. C 8), den in der Folge zahlreiche rf. Werkstätten herstellten (Oltos, Euphronios [2], Euthymides). Als seine Vorformen können sf. Kannen und Amphoren mit zylindrischem Hohlfuß gelten. Der Typus hielt sich bis ca. 470 v. Chr. (Pan-Maler). Bildliche Dar…

Krater

(321 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] (ὁ κρατήρ von κεράννυμι, keránnymi, “mischen”; Linear B: Akk. ka-ra-te-ra). Weitmundiges Gefäß zum Mischen von Wasser und Wein, beim Gastmahl (Hom. Od. 1,110) wie bei Opferriten (Hom. Il. 3,269) und rel. Festen (Hdt. 1,51) verwendet. Gyges, Alyattes und Kroisos sollen große Prunk-K. aus Edelmetall nach Delphi gestiftet haben. Ihr Fassungsvermögen war nach Amphoren (Hdt. 1,51; 70; vgl. Hom. Il. 23,741; Amphora [2]), ihr Wert nach Gewicht angegeben (Hdt. 1,14; vgl. Plin. nat. 33,15). K.-Untersätze ( hypokratērídia, hypóstata) waren gesondert gearbeitet (Hd…

Lieblingsinschriften

(617 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] Die griech. Sitte, mit dem Epitheton kalós (καλός, mask. = “schön”), seltener kalḗ (καλή, fem.), die Schönheit einer Person öffentlich zu preisen, ist v.a. in - bereits vor dem Brand der Gefäße aufgebrachten - attischen Vaseninschr. des 6. und 5. Jh. v.Chr. faßbar [1; 5]; daneben gab es spontane Graffiti auf Vasen [3] und andere öffentliche L. [4. 22, 46-65] (schol. Aristoph. Vesp. 98). Sie wurzeln in einem auch aus der frühgriech. Lyrik sprechenden Interesse an der schönen Jugend und in den päderastischen Konventionen der Zeit, aber darüber hinaus auch im Ideal der ka…

Phiale

(273 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[English version] (φιάλη). In homerischer Zeit Bezeichnung für Kessel (Lebes), Becken, Gefäß allg., später nur noch für eine fuß- und henkellose flache Schale, die zu besserer Handhabung im Unterschied zum altorientalischen Vorbild mit Omphalos versehen war, einer zentralen Einwölbung des Bodens, in die der Finger von unten eingriff. Schon im 7. Jh.v.Chr. ist diese Form mit der Bezeichnung Ph. belegt. Nach lit. und bildlichen Zeugnissen vorwiegend als Opferschale für flüssige Spenden und als ritue…

Amphora

(308 words)

Author(s): Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld) | Mlasowsky, Alexander (Hannover)
[German version] [1] Storage and transport vessel (ἀμφορεύς; amphoreús). Two-handled, bulbous storage and transport vessel with a narrow neck. The predominant form of storage vessels in antiquity, these have survived mainly in clay, rarely in bronze, precious metals, glass or onyx. Among  household equipment regarded as undecorated ceramics for everyday use ( Clay vessels II). Painted amphoras served ritual purposes as ornamental items on graves, urns for storing ashes, food storage vessels for the dead…

Astragalos

(257 words)

Author(s): Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) | Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
(ἀστράγαλος; astrágalos). [German version] [1] see Ornaments see  Ornaments Hurschmann, Rolf (Hamburg) [German version] [2] Playing-piece Playing-piece ( talus). Knucklebones from calves and sheep/goats, also those made of gold, glass, marble, clay, metals and ivory, mentioned already in Hom. Il. 23,85-88 as playing-pieces. Astragaloi were used as counters for games of chance,  dice and throwing games, including the games ‘odd or even’ (Pl. Ly. 206e) or πεντάλιθα ( pentálitha,  Games of dexterity). In the astragalos game the individual sides had varying values: the co…

Pottery, production of

(2,347 words)

Author(s): Pingel, Volker (Bochum) | Scheibler, Ingeborg (Krefeld)
[German version] I. Celtic-Germanic civilizations The manufacture of pottery in the Celtic and Germanic world is characterized by two shaping processes: 1) freehand moulding without any technical aids and 2) shaping on the potter’s wheel. Until the early Celts adopted the high-speed wheel from the Mediterranean world, coiling pots by hand and other freehand shaping methods were the sole methods and remained in practice into the Middle Ages to varying degrees. In central Europe, pottery thrown on potters’ wheels in local shops from the early Celtic 'princely seats' …
▲   Back to top   ▲